How To Build "Good Neighbor Cap & Trim" Fence - Carpentry - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Carpentry

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 05-27-2014, 03:17 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

How to build "Good Neighbor Cap & Trim" fence


I'm in the planning stages of installing a new fence at our house and due to HOA requirements they have pretty strict guidelines of what type of fence we can build. I've done several privacy fences with no problem, but I'm a little confused how this one has any structural strength at all.

I was told it has to be a "good neighbor" fence similar to the one in the picture where you can see the 4x4 post on both sides, and then have a 2x4 cap on top with 1x4 trim below the top cap and 1x4 trim on the bottom.

Is this simply constructed by constructing the cap where the pickets fit into, then screwing the 2x4s into the posts and attaching the pickets to the trim? I've looked at several in the neighborhood, and they just seem to have toe-nail screws tieing everything into the posts, which does not seem sturdy at all to me.

I also have the option of building a "normal" fence with 3 rails/stringers on the inside attached to the 4x4 posts then just adding a cap/trim similar to the other picture.

Option 1 is quite a bit cheaper due to far less materials (it has to be all cedar) but I also want something that will last 15-20 yrs.
Attached Thumbnails
How to build "Good Neighbor Cap & Trim" fence-cap-trim-example.jpg  
Attached Images
 
kevindeutsch is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-27-2014, 04:34 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


Go back to the HOA board and have them give you specific instructions on the following. What materials. The design drawing of the fence. The height of the fence. The depth of the posts. Their definition of what they consider is a "Good Neighbor Fence".

If they cannot show you the specifics in the by-laws, or write on paper what the specifics are. Go to your fellow neighbors in the subdivision and look around. If all of them are different materials and designs.

Take pictures of every fence in the neighborhood you see. Take those back to the HOA board, along with what address and tell them that the HOA board is not abiding by their own rules and regulations. That you are going to go with what you feel that you and the neighbors on both sides of you agree on.

Any fence that goes between neighbors. The costs are usually split between both parties for the installation. Get three quotes from local fence companies. Get recommendations from the HOA of companies that they recommend. If they can even come up with any.

If the HOA is unable to answer any of your questions, or hems and haws on not responding to you and your neighbors questions, regarding what they want for a fence. Nor why they allow different fencing designs. Then they do not have a leg to stand on.



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-27-2014, 04:41 PM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default


I'm not overly concerned about the HOA, they sent me the bottom picture and said this is the "preferred style" that is called out in the HOA covenant (which I verified). They said the top picture is ok to have to.

I can easily build the top picture, but I honestly like the look of the bottom picture, I just don't understand how it is structuraly sufficient to withstand our KS winds. Thats why I'm thinking there is something I'm missing in the construction of it, and I've looked at a lot of fences in the area to get an idea.

All fences in the neighborhood are either one of the 2 styles in the pictures (or wrought iron).
kevindeutsch is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 05-27-2014, 05:01 PM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Texas
Posts: 28
Rewards Points: 36
Default


Hard to tell on the bottom photo, but it looks like there is a rot board. Definitely worth it if that is an option. I prefer metal posts if allowed - not as "pretty" but sure last longer than wooden posts.
Easypick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2014, 05:18 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 17,158
Rewards Points: 6,652
Default


Any fence properly built. Will withstand winds. It is only when the posts rot, or are placed too shallow. Then the fence tends to fall over.



gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Backyard Fence (Part 1) biggidybankston Project Showcase 20 12-04-2010 11:44 PM
Building a fence for father-in-law - question re: time to build. DyerWolf Carpentry 7 04-30-2009 07:45 PM
Building a fence on top of pavement mwalsh Landscaping & Lawn Care 6 04-20-2009 04:16 PM
DIY Replacement of a Wood Fence rcraftlady Building & Construction 4 03-11-2009 06:03 PM
Privacy Fence on one side? caseydm Landscaping & Lawn Care 9 10-28-2008 10:13 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts