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Old 10-05-2015, 12:54 PM   #1
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8" blade on a 10" saw?


I have the dwe7491RS Dewalt 10" saw. Infinity tools sells a blade with a 1/4" flat top kerf. The blade only comes in 8".

Can I run an 8" blade on a 10" saw, and are there were any safety concerns in doing so?
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Old 10-05-2015, 01:22 PM   #2
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I would use it. Most dado blades are only 8" for a 10" saw.
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Old 10-05-2015, 01:29 PM   #3
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It can be used as long as the boss is the same fitting. Be careful with the gap between the riving knife and blade edge, as this will be compromised with the difference in size. It could cause the wood to snatch as it is fed through, so do bear that in mind when feeding timber through.

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Old 10-05-2015, 04:00 PM   #4
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some rip blades have a flat kerf, and there are many low tooth count, flat kerf blades made in 10". Also as mentioned, 8" dado stacks are run on 10" saws all the time.

Not sure why you need the flat kerf...maybe there is another solution?
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Old 10-05-2015, 08:24 PM   #5
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My dado stack is only a 6" and works in my 10" table saw. Just as long as the arbor is the same size.
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Old 10-05-2015, 11:20 PM   #6
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I assume this is the blade in question. This blade was assuredly made to work with normal table saws that typically spin 10" blades.

Others know more about this than me, but if you goal with this blade to avoid the "bat ears" you get with a typical dado stack, I think these are intentional to reduce tear out. Probably not an issue if you've only cutting grooves (rips) and never dados (crosscuts).

It does seem a little odd to me to mate such a specialized blade with a jobsite saw. But I've done more than my share of trying to do woodworking while making due with less than ideal tools and work environments so I probably shouldn't be talking.
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Old 10-06-2015, 01:35 PM   #7
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@1acre , maybe he's making a lot of 1/4" box joints?
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Old 10-06-2015, 02:51 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 47_47 View Post
@1acre , maybe he's making a lot of 1/4" box joints?
That's what I figured...if it's the slop in the joints, it can usually be handled by a bench chisel. Depending on how many cuts need to be cleaned up, that is probably the cheapest option, but more time is involved. Many ways to skin this cat....if we are in fact talking about the same cat.
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Old 10-06-2015, 06:22 PM   #9
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I'll admit that I am still learning. Woodworking is a very strong interest of mine and is becoming a larger hobby for me as time allows. I currently lack the space for a larger shop saw and am making due with my Dewalt. I think it's a great saw to learn on, but I know a real saw would be much better.

I plan to make 67 shaker style cabinet doors. I want a blade that can cut the groove needed for the center panel. I have a flat top combination blade that does it, but the Infinity blade would do it in less passes.

I also plan to build a dresser and was aiming at box joints for the drawers. Also, I have a strong interest in learning how to build furniture, such as upholstered chairs where tenons are the strength in joinery.

On top of all of that, I also intend to build a small shop in 2-5yrs where I would then replace my Dewalt with a larger shop saw.

So, I figured owning this blade wouldn't be a bad thing if I took care of it long enough to use it on the shop saw that I get in the future.
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Old 10-06-2015, 06:24 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LanterDan View Post
It does seem a little odd to me to mate such a specialized blade with a jobsite saw. But I've done more than my share of trying to do woodworking while making due with less than ideal tools and work environments
You pretty much nailed it.
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Old 10-06-2015, 06:26 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sbtools View Post
It can be used as long as the boss is the same fitting. Be careful with the gap between the riving knife and blade edge, as this will be compromised with the difference in size. It could cause the wood to snatch as it is fed through, so do bear that in mind when feeding timber through.

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Thanks! This is why I asked. I didn't even think about the riving knife, though as long as I don't let it climb onto the blade, I should be ok.


Edit: Sorry about the multiple posts for responses. I got used to another forum where, if you responded again before anyone else did, it would automatically merge your posts together.
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Old 10-06-2015, 07:39 PM   #12
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Just food for thought...there is nothing wrong with the infinity blade being used to cut a groove in the rail for shaker style doors. I'd personally double up the passes and save the $100. But, if looking to expand the hobby, a router and table would be an excellent place to take it to the next level and usually can use very little space. Certainly, more money. But, well worth it IMO.

Good luck.
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Old 10-07-2015, 09:55 AM   #13
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I agree with the router idea, especially if you are looking to make other cabinet furniture as it will pay for itself in one job. I have used the saw for exactly what you intend on the doors and slotted 3mm grooves in the wood for cosmetic looks as well as the rebates for inside panels. Although the saw blade can be lowered enough for the cuts, the router is so much more versatile and easy to swap the bits for rebates or chamfered angles. It is the easy option in the long term.

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Old 10-07-2015, 11:27 AM   #14
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I'd vote for dado stack or router table w/ a straight bit. I've made a dozen or so shaker style doors, and did them all on the TS with the dado set (they weren't centered, so this way was less work). How thick your panels are going to be, and whether or not they are to be centered, would be the deciding fact for me when deciding whether or not to use a FTG blade, versus a dado set or straight bit. My door frames were 3/4", with 1/2" plywood panels. Panels were rabbeted on the back side slightly to fit a 3/8" groove.

Whatever you go with, you'll want to use featherboards (doubled up if you can) to keep the workpiece tight to the fence.
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