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Old 06-21-2015, 03:42 PM   #16
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Unfortunately, it is. I've worked for numerous "slum lords" over the past 30 years and many of them do just enough on their properties to "get by." I've seen things like DUCT TAPE used to repair kitchen drain pipes where someone cut the pipe an inch too short and then it was extended with the duct tape. I've seen them insist on using crappy paint from Big Lots to paint walls. I've seen them scrub carpets that should have been replaced 20 years ago. You get the picture.

Luckily, there are some landlords who really do care and really do take care of their properties.
I meant specifically on the railings. I did some research and have seen home improvement personalities repair railings by cutting the rusted part of and using a new extension, and there are products that apparently neutralize the rust, but I was curious if you guys knew any more on the subject.

But since we are talking, I'll share too. Amongst other things, I have seen a basic porcelin fixture broken and duct taped to the electrical box, and a outlet in the garage that could not hold a plug and concrete screws were screwed into the plywood with a string wrapped around to hold the plug in place. Then there is the hole in the floor by the radiator were the floor rotted away and the metal collar rusted off because the radiator leaked. I even vaccumed up pieces of the rusted metal, and the radiator had no water in it when I tried to bleed it. I was told this was "resolved".
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Old 06-21-2015, 06:38 PM   #17
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There's surface rust and there's rust that goes all the way through or even originates inside the railing (if hollow). The former can be sanded off, than a rusty metal primer can be applied or even a rust converter before applying two coats of Rustoleum type paint. The latter is just a losing battle. Once rust gets a foothold and gets to the inside or originates from condensation inside, well, it is toast and should be replaced. Pics would sure help in this case.
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Old 06-22-2015, 08:34 AM   #18
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I'm a landlord and I find the find the suggestion to commit criminal vandalism offensive.

I also had a hand rail that rotted at the base. I paid a welder to repair it. On his truck he had 3x3 metal plates which he secured to the concrete and metal tubing one size larger that slipped over the existing tubing after he cut away the rotted area. He welded the new tubing to the old and to the base plate. Then he ground down his welds until the were smooth.

IMO, the repair was as good as the original and looked fine once it was painted.
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Old 06-22-2015, 05:34 PM   #19
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Here is the infamous railing, the bottom rail behind the post is of course loose also.
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Rusted out metal railing-dscf7108.jpg  
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Old 06-22-2015, 06:05 PM   #20
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That is a trap to harm someone with.

If I save a child or some ones grandmother from harm if they happen to be grasping that when it finally fails. I will vandalize it every time.


I THINK:

It is my civic duty to do what I think is right to protect others, even if it is not the popular thing.

And will not argue with anyone over it.

I too was a landlord years ago, but once I realized that I was doing more improvements to rentals than I was my own home I sold out and only did improvements for my home, or as a contracted repairman.


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Old 06-22-2015, 06:44 PM   #21
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If you are in an area that gets ice & snow. Salt will speed up the process, when thrown on the steps to melt the ice.



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Old 06-22-2015, 06:57 PM   #22
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P.S. Mtspartan : check your P.M. file
I did, I apparently don't have the "points" to respond. Thanks for all the responses though, and I will pm you when I can.
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Old 06-22-2015, 07:00 PM   #23
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That is a trap to harm someone with.
Again, this has been "repaired". I'm curious if this is something that should be repaired or replaced. The impression I'm getting is that either method is reasonable and it is more a matter of preference, I just could not previously conceive that repairing a rail in this condition was safe. And given that the owner has a history of wanting things repaired that should have been replaced decades ago, I was suspicious for that reason.

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Old 06-22-2015, 08:30 PM   #24
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It can always be repaired. If you sleeve one. You may as well sleeve all of the other posts for the railing, so that it looks like it came that way.



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Old 06-22-2015, 09:32 PM   #25
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It can always be repaired. If you sleeve one. You may as well sleeve all of the other posts for the railing, so that it looks like it came that way.
Any clue on what the labor costs roughly to do this? It was two railings, each only with one post.
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Old 06-22-2015, 11:42 PM   #26
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Now I am confused.

Is the picture before or after the repair?

I do not see enough solid iron on that to be sleeved .

My opinion is that that entire corner and some of the loose bottom rail needs to be replaced.

I hope that this is not what they call repaired.


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Old 06-23-2015, 12:59 AM   #27
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Now I am confused.

Is the picture before or after the repair?

I do not see enough solid iron on that to be sleeved .

My opinion is that that entire corner and some of the loose bottom rail needs to be replaced.

I hope that this is not what they call repaired.


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When I said it has been repaired I meant it is no longer in the condition it is shown as in the picture. So yes, this is the before, I don't know what the after looks like.
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Old 06-23-2015, 02:12 AM   #28
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Any clue on what the labor costs roughly to do this? It was two railings, each only with one post.
Read the Sticky, regarding your question.



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Old 06-23-2015, 02:14 AM   #29
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For the sake of the whole handrail argument. The mounting and the railing is supposed to be strong enough to keep a person of X amount of pounds from pushing the railing over, which would allow them to fall onto the ground.

That also means that if someone was to sit on it. It should never give way.



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