Conundrum No Metal In Hydro Oil Change, But Clatter Remains In 1210 Ford Tractor - Tractors & Mowers - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
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Old 04-25-2015, 11:33 AM   #1
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Conundrum no metal in hydro oil change, but clatter remains in 1210 Ford tractor


This is a continuing update from earlier post. I blew a hydro hose on my Ford 1210 bucket, replaced and the next thing was a clatter when hydrostatic drive was engaged.

No metal, but lots of water found in the hydro change. Same with the next change, as I couldn't get it level in order to drain the first time. Was told it can take 3 or more changes to get all the water out.

I am hopeful that the water is contributing to the clatter while in drive or reverse. Clatter doesn't seem to be in the front or back, but thru out. Also no metal was found in the first dump. I was told by a Ford tractor mechanic that before you hear noise, it will already begin shaving metal.

He also thought it should be distinctly in the front or back, if the tranny gears were fubared up. I have one more oil change before I think I'll run clear. Just wondered if anyone had any experience with this. The alternative is driving it to a repair house 70 miles away and having them change 90 buck an hour to tell me something I may be able to find out before that happens.
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Old 04-25-2015, 02:29 PM   #2
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It is possible that the "clatter" you are hearing is from air and/or water in your system. Without seeing the system, I don't know how to advise you regarding bleeding the system.

That said, you need to figure out how the water is getting in there. That is a huge problem, and may actually have already done irreparable damage.
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Old 04-25-2015, 02:49 PM   #3
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Water commonly gets in thru condensation. Like I said, there were no metal shavings that I can find from the first change, so am hoping no damage. I intend to strain the second to make sure. The first change I backed it up on ramps to drain. But that didn't allow for everthing that was in the front to drain. So i guess that is where the additional water in the second change came from. This next time it will be level so should be able to get it all out.
Plus will be cleaning suction and hydropump filters again.
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Old 04-25-2015, 06:34 PM   #4
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Condensation will not get you "lots of water." Perhaps a tiny little bit. If this is a sealed system, there should be no water in it at all.

That's a heavy hydrostat in that tractor - and expensive. Hopefully you can find out why there's water in there & correct it, get the air out of the lines, and be on the road to Happyville.
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Old 04-25-2015, 07:17 PM   #5
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It wasn't changed properly in the past...not sure how much is cumulative water. I'm hoping it's not the hydrostat too. It had water in the front axels as well. But they are part of a different system. Do you know how I could eliminate the hydrostat as the problem?
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Old 04-25-2015, 07:41 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onjtrainee View Post
It wasn't changed properly in the past...not sure how much is cumulative water. I'm hoping it's not the hydrostat too. It had water in the front axels as well. But they are part of a different system. Do you know how I could eliminate the hydrostat as the problem?
Process of elimination.

Your front axle is separate entity. Drain it and refill it with the proper gear oil.

I'm shooting from the hip here, because I'm not intimately familiar with that particular tractor. But I believe it has both the hydraulic pump, the control valve, and the transmission/hydraulic motor itself. That's a rugged system that should not just go to pieces.

Did it chatter like this before you blew the hose and lost all your fluid?
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Old 04-25-2015, 07:54 PM   #7
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No. That's why I figured the two things had to be related.

The hydrostatic pump filter had never been replaced, and was filthy. I ordered a new one. The suction filter was cleanable so I did that.

I posted a question on Tractorbynet as well. Got a reply with a link to someone with a similar issue. Lots of replies to this guy. Seems like lots of people think the problem can go away if the water in the line will. Recommend repeat draining. I am crossing my fingers and toes.

Last edited by onjtrainee; 04-25-2015 at 08:01 PM.
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Old 04-25-2015, 07:59 PM   #8
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No. That's why I figured the two things had to be related.

The hydrostatic pump filter had never been replaced, and was filthy. I ordered a new one. The suction filter was cleanable so I did that.
If it was fine before blowing the hose (and subsequently losing the fluid) it should be fine after you get it all put back together.

I assume you're using the proper hydraulic fluid for that model.

You might want to scour some tech manuals and see if it is necessary to bleed the lines - though I doubt it is. I think what it boils down to is that you have air in the system, and it's going to take some time to get it out.
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Old 04-25-2015, 08:23 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by DrHicks View Post
If it was fine before blowing the hose (and subsequently losing the fluid) it should be fine after you get it all put back together.

I assume you're using the proper hydraulic fluid for that model.

You might want to scour some tech manuals and see if it is necessary to bleed the lines - though I doubt it is. I think what it boils down to is that you have air in the system, and it's going to take some time to get it out.
My NH mechanic friend says I can use 303 for the preliminary flushes. Go back with the 134D recommended by the manufacturer for the last change. It had RO in it last change which is heavier. I left it to someone who said they knew what they were doing. Live and learn.

I hope you are right. One thing that gives me some optimism is that the clattering is not predominantly in the front or the rear, which means broken teeth on gears to my mechanic buddy. He asked me to find out if it was more in the back or front. The sound seems pretty spread out to me. Also didn't find metal in the first dump, which he said would certainly be there if the problem was that extensive. Of course I don't have magnet and not sure if filing would stick to one if I stuck it in the bucket I'm fixing to recycle. Would be the next thing to eliminate tho. Messy bidness this is!

Last edited by onjtrainee; 04-25-2015 at 08:39 PM.
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