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Old 11-13-2015, 09:17 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by jstrueh View Post
So what do you think I should do? Remove the systems check behind it for clogs in the drain holes? Can I seal the old system back down or just look to replace?

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Once you remove those pieces, they are trashed. If you can get a camera in where that PVC pipe exits out into the French Drain, then you can look in there to see if there are any signs of water.

Even a simple Goose neck one from Harbor Freight, would allow you to peek in there.

As for the paint, it has definitely been on the walls for a long time. Could be Ugly, could just be Latex.

Even if they did open up the floor when they put those pieces in. The water would just go under the slab and over time would undermine.

If you want to get rid of that system and go with a real drainage system, along with recoat the outside of the block, place the membrane that would allow any water to go down to the outside perimeter drain, that would go into that French Drain. You need to start getting serious and be ready to open up the check book.

The biggest issue is with all of the concrete around the house. They would have to cut probably 4-5' away from the house, so that they can dig down to the footers and get under where the French drain sits, to put the tile into it, so that the sump will do its job.

Have you checked with neighbors around you to see if they have water issues, or that there is a known high water table around the property?



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Old 11-13-2015, 09:21 PM   #17
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Once you remove those pieces, they are trashed. If you can get a camera in where that PVC pipe exits out into the French Drain, then you can look in there to see if there are any signs of water.

Even a simple Goose neck one from Harbor Freight, would allow you to peek in there.

As for the paint, it has definitely been on the walls for a long time. Could be Ugly, could just be Latex.

Even if they did open up the floor when they put those pieces in. The water would just go under the slab and over time would undermine.

If you want to get rid of that system and go with a real drainage system, along with recoat the outside of the block, place the membrane that would allow any water to go down to the outside perimeter drain, that would go into that French Drain. You need to start getting serious and be ready to open up the check book.

The biggest issue is with all of the concrete around the house. They would have to cut probably 4-5' away from the house, so that they can dig down to the footers and get under where the French drain sits, to put the tile into it, so that the sump will do its job.

Have you checked with neighbors around you to see if they have water issues, or that there is a known high water table around the property?
Yes water problems in Basement in my neighborhood is common

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Old 11-13-2015, 09:25 PM   #18
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if anyone thinks air quality's causing that coating to fail & water vapor to discolor it, they probably live in some place w/weed issues - legal or otherwise - so i disagree,,, coating faulure's from what's BEHIND it

we have fha heat w/NO vents in the bsmnt but we do run an 80pint dehumidifier

that 'cove system' is there for a reason - common to monopour/unipour/turned-down-edge OR someone was lazy & didn't want to break the floor,,, 1st find out what the footer/bsmnt wall method is then we can move forward,,, we do this work for a living - i may not be right but i don't think so
Highly doubtful anyone has weed issues. Since you brought it up, I would venture to guess that you may be the one with that issue. It really has no bearing on the OP issue, so why bring it up.

It sounds to me that you are trying to throw the OP a sales pitch, without looking at the big picture of what they stated.

Deal with the Air Quality and Relative Humidity. Then deal with getting the money together to get a solution done, which if the OP does not want to bust up the outside, it can be done around the inside perimeter and eliminate those band-aids.

Lived in enough places that had high water table issues, that those interior drains are not worth a crap. They are just a band aid, so that the home owner is not forking out big bucks for a proper weeping tile system around the outside of the home, along with the vinyl to help direct any water down to the weeping tile, with it not getting against the block foundation.

Plus they need to deal with the fact that all of that concrete will have to be cut away, so that a proper system can be installed and help get rid of the whole slime, mold, mildew that is collecting between the walls and the band aid.

As for doing that for a living. Unless you are selling your services to the OP, all that any of us are doing right now, are making random guesses at this point of what the problem can and cannot be.

The OP needs to get air moving into that basement with outside air, to start drying out not only the Basement, but the rest of the house, so that they can start getting rid of the Mold & Mildew spores that have also settled around the house.



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Old 11-13-2015, 09:34 PM   #19
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Yes water problems in Basement in my neighborhood is common
Grew up in a neighborhood that you went by how full the various wells around the neighborhood were filled, which told you how high the water table was at that time of the year.

The whole subdivision was built over a old mine that around the 90's, the water finally started to drain out and caused Subsidence.

The worst house my parents had out of the three that they lived in, in that same neighborhood. The sump never stopped. The water table never went down, because of the fact that there was an underground stream and a Aquifer on that land.

The last house they lived in. The builder took a Volleyball and shoved it into the hole that the stream was flowing through, so that it would cut down on how much water would be able to gather around the house.

At one point the underground spring after some heavy rains that helped to fill up the Aquifer. It caused it to actually start flowing out of the Cornfield between our subdivision and another.

My house that I live in now is settled in one corner about 3/4", because of not having the gutters extended in the past. At first we thought that it was high water table issues. But ended up just that we had the rains from one of the Hurricanes come up our way that actually caused the water to be almost 3' up from the footings at that corner.

You can actually get De-Humidifier units that are attached to the foundation and exhaust the hot air to the outside. Any water would just drain into the French Drain.



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Old 11-14-2015, 04:13 AM   #20
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& you walked uphill to school - both ways,,, IF the issue were just high humidity in the space, water would collect & run down the cold walls & the coating would still look pristine,,, obviously that's not the condition pictured
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Old 11-14-2015, 02:07 PM   #21
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& you walked uphill to school - both ways,,, IF the issue were just high humidity in the space, water would collect & run down the cold walls & the coating would still look pristine,,, obviously that's not the condition pictured
Just because you've done this kind of work for a living for 50 years means nothing. Obviously, gregzoll lnows more than you because he has a higher post count................
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Old 11-14-2015, 04:16 PM   #22
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or he's got more free time are you going to woc this year ? i may now that icri & bsmnt health are part of it,,, sure as hell not going back to europe

Last edited by stadry; 11-14-2015 at 04:29 PM.
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Old 11-14-2015, 04:29 PM   #23
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i'm sure the OP is getting confused by now,,, nevertheless, once you remove the cove system, its trashed,,, you should find drain holes in the cells & web IF the original installer did that part right,,, i'll bet they're plugged up & you'll be able to see that w/a flashlight.

so - you have 2 choices - excavate outside & waterproof OR install the sub-floor perimeter drainage system (some call it a 'french drain'),,, i've never seen water running under the floor undermine a house yet ( its called 'scour' & took down a bdge yrs ago on the nys thruway ) but i've only been doing this work for 30yrs.

whatever you decide, $ will be a significant factor in your decision,,, we routinely excavate, waterproof, & install exterior sumps & pumps w/24" standpipes for future access but generally its condo work,,, those systems obey the 'water takes the path of least resistance' theorem - we've never had callbacks

so - based on the information supplied, that's my story & i'm stickin' to it,,, mixing int/ext air's a good idea but it still won't dry out walls if there's water inside 'em

ps - jomama's link is a good product but we make our own by slicing waffleboard onsite

Last edited by stadry; 11-14-2015 at 04:32 PM.
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Old 11-14-2015, 06:14 PM   #24
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That's an odd looking system compared to what I've seen.

About twenty years ago our 80 year old twin with stone foundation had water pouring in every rain. The fix was busting the slab out for about a foot around the perimeter, digging out and putting 4" perforated pipe in a bed of stone directed to a pit with submersible pump. Concrete was poured back with a plastic spacer against the outside wall I assume to facilitate flow to the stone and perforated pipe. Then the job cost $2500 and was well worth it. Did the job, but pump ran often. We also had a side walkway that sank toward the house. The next owner resolved that.

A better system is an outside french drain. Similar to above, but next to the outside footing with the pipe draining to a lower elevation. I anticipate that will be more than $4K.

As far as humidity, appears you have way too much water entering for a dehumidifier.
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Old 11-15-2015, 07:52 AM   #25
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its called a ' cove system ' & used as noted previously: for monopour/unipour/turn'd-down-edge foundations, ignorant/cheating salesmen (inspectors/installers, or cheap/ignorant homeowners.

you describe the traditional sub-floor perimeter drainage system ( mistakenly called a 'french drain' by most ),,, even 20 yrs ago, that price was cheap,,, in nj, we got $5K for 40' incl sump & pump

waterproofing is always better but the $$ soars compared to interior work + sometimes its not even possible

humidifiers handle humidity as in moisture vapor, not liquid,,, standing wtr such as the op's experiencing wouldn't overtax an 80pint/day machine imhpo
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