Concrete Floor For Outbuilding - Concrete, Stone & Masonry - Page 3 - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Concrete, Stone & Masonry

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Like Tree7Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes
Old 06-12-2019, 10:15 AM   #31
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: Northern Virginia, which I'm told is different from "real" Virginia
Posts: 41
Rewards Points: 82
Default

Re: Concrete Floor for Outbuilding


Quote:
Originally Posted by F250 View Post
As I've just read through all posts in this thread, one thing I want to ask... Do you think you may ever (EVER) want to remove the roof and add a second level to the building (apartment for relative, for rent, etc.)? If so, this should be considered in the slab and footing design up front.
I'm generally hesitant to use absolute terms like "always," "never," "any," "all," etc., or at least I try to be, but I think I can safely say that adding a second level to this building would never happen. Using it as a dwelling would require running plumbing, stairs would eat up a lot of my limited floor space, and, most importantly, the county would throw a fit and make me take it down because it would violate the onerous setback requirements.
PatentPending is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-12-2019, 12:38 PM   #32
Still learning every day!
 
F250's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Birmingham, AL
Posts: 381
Rewards Points: 762
Default

Re: Concrete Floor for Outbuilding


Quote:
Originally Posted by PatentPending View Post
I'm generally hesitant to use absolute terms like "always," "never," "any," "all," etc., or at least I try to be, but I think I can safely say that adding a second level to this building would never happen. Using it as a dwelling would require running plumbing, stairs would eat up a lot of my limited floor space, and, most importantly, the county would throw a fit and make me take it down because it would violate the onerous setback requirements.

Understand completely. Just had to ask. It's part of the "what-if" inquiry process I go through on every project, both at work and at home. You might say that it's just a part of my approach to life every day.
__________________
Pete

Bark less, wag MORE, and Show Compassion to everyone you meet!
F250 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-12-2019, 09:27 PM   #33
Concrete & Masonry
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 3,663
Rewards Points: 272
Default

Re: Concrete Floor for Outbuilding


Typically speaking, in OUR area, a 4" slab with a thickened edge (8"minimum, sometimes up to 18" depending on the sturcture) will do exactly what you need from it for a shed. There's a number of terms for the thickened edge, such as "grade beam", "turned down edge", "perimeter beam", etc.... Lingo varies by location, but they all generally mean the same thing.

Big things to watch for is that all organics (topsoil, etc) is removed completely, a minimum of 3-4" of gravel is installed AND compacted well, and that a vapor barrier is installed if you want to avoid the potential for the floor to sweat.

Good luck, I couldn't sleep at night if I charged as much as the quotes you're getting!
Colbyt likes this.
jomama45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 06-12-2019, 11:54 PM   #34
Hammered Thumb
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: SuburbanIL
Posts: 634
Rewards Points: 1,266
Default

Re: Concrete Floor for Outbuilding


Quote:
Originally Posted by PatentPending View Post
10K was a number I absolutely pulled out of my ass

stick welder weighs 350 pounds
welding table weighs 400 pounds
250 pounds of scrap steel
lathe and milling machines
Grinders, saws, drill press
Keep your psf vs. psi straight

And unless you are stacking all of that stuff on top of each other, 10K is pretty substantial. Also you may decide against heavy-gauge metal studs if inside is unfinished and you are hanging a lot. You'll need a lot of plywood/bracing/blocking that you'll choose to do in wood anyways.

Me thinks you already need a bigger shed.
3onthetree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 09:59 PM   #35
Member
 
HenryMac's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Central Colorado
Posts: 755
Rewards Points: 762
Default

Re: Concrete Floor for Outbuilding


Quote:
Originally Posted by PatentPending View Post
So... "trust, but verify" is what I'm gathering from this... and I guess I'll just have to work from home the day the work is actually done. Good point about the compaction. I've made sure to verify that compacting the soil is part of the job, but I guess I'll have to further specify how that happens (plate compactor, right?).
Be there, and let them know you will be there. Always a good idea in case questions come up.

I wouldn't specify what they use for compaction, I'd ask what they will be using. There's a lot of different devices, what they use will depend on a lot of factors.

And they shouldn't be compacting "soil" at all. They scrape off the organic matter (top soil that has grass and stuff in it) down to undisturbed soil. Then they add crushed aggregate and compact it.

Here's something I wrote on another site...

Leveling the site
  • What equipment will be used?
  • If they add fill material, what will fill materials will they use? Material from a local aggregate processor that has known compaction properties or what?
  • Will they compact the fill material?
  • What height / thickness of fill do they add before they compact the fill? 4”, 5", 6”
  • Will they add / compact / add in multiple lifts?
  • What elevation will the slab be? Make sure the construction drawings show the final elevation that is relative to a fixed undisturbed point at the building site.
  • Do they test for proper compaction? If yes, how and to what standard?

Concrete Slab
  • What elevation will the slab be? Make sure the construction drawings show the final elevation that is relative to a fixed undisturbed point at the building site.
  • Ask how they prepare the sub-grade for the concrete slab. Tell them you are likely going to have a density test performed before the slab is poured (Even if you're not).
  • Ask what concrete thickness and what concrete strength will be used. Tell them you want to see a mix sheet for the concrete they are proposing to use and that you will inspect the mix sheets for every load that arrives on site and you shall approve it before it is used.
  • Ask if they follow American Concrete Institute (ACI) standard practices.
  • Ask if they will follow ACI “Cold Weather Concreting” standards.
  • What reinforcing steel will they use? If they are using mesh or rebar what type, diameter, and spacing?
  • If they use mesh, are they using sheets or rolls? Do they use wire ties to secure the re-bar / mesh? Do they overlap the re-bar / mesh at seams?
  • Will they use dobies or chairs to properly locate the reinforcing steel?
  • Will they also use fibre mesh, in addition to reinforcing steel?
  • Will they cut the control joints within 12 hours?
Nealtw likes this.
HenryMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply



Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts