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Old 04-10-2019, 11:25 AM   #46
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Re: Need Help with Exterior Door Moulding


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Originally Posted by ZEW496 View Post
Don't attach the extension to the brick molding and then try to attach both brick molding and extension to the jamb. Attack the extension to the jamb, glued and nailed. Then attach the brick molding to the extension, glued and nailed. Plan out well, once glued it's going to be tough to regroup and start over.

Let's start here: What kind of tools do you have, or can get your hands on, borrow?

Drill
Circular Saw?
Table Saw?
Nail Gun and Compressor?

You need 3 strips of wood to fashion an extension, to extend the depth of the jamb out to duplicate the old jamb. One on each side from bottom to top, and a shorter one that will fit between those two horizontally across the top. "Rip" means cut wood along the grain length wise rather than a cross cut. Did you see my door? I ripped lengths of pre-primed wood, one for each side, one for horizontal at the top. I chose to mount the wood on the jamb flush, but you can do a reveal(a set back) if you choose. I then did a reveal when I installed the brick molding to the extension. Your problem is, the inside of the jamb is so far away from the brick. If you make the extension flush with the inside of the jamb, you will have a 1" reveal when you install the brick molding. That's not the end of the world. However, you may choose to stagger the reveal. 1/2" reveal at the jamb/ extension junction, another 1/2' reveal when you install the brick molding. Whichever way you choose, that 1" reveal will make it so the edge of your brick molding is close to the brick, making it much more easier and neater to caulk.

Another problem you have, your framing is proud to your jamb. If you attach a 1x3 extension on one side to the jamb, and the other to the framing, it is going to be cockeyed because of the framing being proud. A solution, you need to find out how proud the framing is, and notch out the 1x3 extension on the framing side so it will sit flush on both the jamb and the framing without being cockeyed. It is pretty simple to do...with a table saw.

And, yes, measure & cut carefully and assemble your brick molding on the ground, a flat surface. Then lift into place, glue and nail. Assemble by lining up the corner miters, and screwing through the side and into the upper horizontal piece. You can smear a little caulk on the screw heads, but you'll never see them once the brick molding is installed.

Some of these things would be a lot easier with a nail gun. For instance, assemble the brick molding, apply glue, lift into place, and then tack it on with the nail gun rather than banging away with a hammer. After it is tacked into place and making good contact with the glued surface, you can go right back and secure things with finish nails and hammer.

Tools, man. Get some, start a collection you can utilize for projects in the future. You dig? For about 300-400 bucks you can probably get a small table saw, nail gun and compressor. Then you're golden to handle your project, and whatever might come up in the future. A circular saw and drill, you already have? Follow safety guidelines and wear eye protection.
I actually have a lot of tools but I'm more of an automotive mechanic than a carpenter. I have a drill, bits, circular saw, and an air compressor but not a nail gun or a table saw.

Is gluing necessary? I was planning on nailing everything together but can glue if needed. I don't have a table saw but I can see if my brother or friend has one. How do you cut a notch in the 1x3 without going all the way through? Is there a depth adjustment on table saws?
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Old 04-10-2019, 12:02 PM   #47
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Re: Need Help with Exterior Door Moulding


Yes, there is a depth adjustment on a table saw. Glue is not absolutely necessary, but it is good practice, imo. I should have noted you should also glue the miters on your bricking molding during assembly. Brick molding is a fairly large piece of trim, you don't want it moving around too much during change of weather conditions, expansion and contraction. Movement can also possibly cause your caulk lines to develop cracks, allowing moisture to get in there. Good quality caulk is your friend, also. Glue helps to keep things tight and minimize that movement. Go for a stable monolithic end product.

Of course you can place blocks of the needed thickness to the framing just as the previous guy did. Cut a strip of wood to make a jamb extension, then attach that strip to the jamb. Then attach blocks of the needed thickness to the "brown board" framing. This would allow you to adjust if there is a difference in the thickness of how proud the framing is to the jamb from top to bottom. Personally, I would rather do it all with one notched 1 x board from top to bottom if possible.

One thing I was noticing from your pictures when you were "playing around with some of the 1 x 3 scrap" -> Are you certain the door has been installed centered? It looks like the space between the inside of the jamb and the brick on the right side is greater than the space between the inside jamb and the wood siding(or whatever material it is) on the left side. Preferably it should be the same. If what I am seeing is accurate, and in order for both sides to look the same when trimmed-out, you will have to go with the lesser reveal, which is the left side. This is going to end with the brick molding having a bigger gap at the brick to caulk on the right side. Both reveals should...must look the same. Follow?

Just to check, if not obvious....measure between each side on the inside of the jamb, the jamb opening. Find the center there(divide the jamb opening by 2), mark the upper horizontal jamb at the center. Measure from that mark to the brick on the right. Measure from that mark to the wood siding on the left. Are those measurements the same? You don't have to reinstall your door to make it centered, but you have to trim it out correctly with a reveal the same on each side.
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Old 04-10-2019, 12:15 PM   #48
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Re: Need Help with Exterior Door Moulding


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Originally Posted by ZEW496 View Post
Yes, there is a depth adjustment on a table saw. Glue is not absolutely necessary, but it is good practice, imo. I should have noted you should also glue the miters on your bricking molding during assembly. Brick molding is a fairly large piece of trim, you don't want it moving around too much during change of weather conditions, expansion and contraction. Movement can also possibly cause your caulk lines to develop cracks, allowing moisture to get in there. Good quality caulk is your friend, also. Glue helps to keep things tight and minimize that movement. Go for a stable monolithic end product.

Of course you can place blocks of the needed thickness to the framing just as the previous guy did. Cut a strip of wood to make a jamb extension, then attach that strip to the jamb. Then attach blocks of the needed thickness to the "brown board" framing. This would allow you to adjust if there is a difference in the thickness of how proud the framing is to the jamb from top to bottom. Personally, I would rather do it all with one notched 1 x board from top to bottom if possible.

One thing I was noticing from your pictures when you were "playing around with some of the 1 x 3 scrap" -> Are you certain the door has been installed centered? It looks like the space between the inside of the jamb and the brick on the right side is greater than the space between the inside jamb and the wood siding(or whatever material it is) on the left side. Preferably it should be the same. If what I am seeing is accurate, and in order for both sides to look the same when trimmed-out, you will have to go with the lesser reveal, which is the left side. This is going to end with the brick molding having a bigger gap at the brick to caulk on the right side. Both reveals should...must look the same. Follow?

Just to check, if not obvious....measure between each side on the inside of the jamb, the jamb opening. Find the center there(divide the jamb opening by 2), mark the upper horizontal jamb at the center. Measure from that mark to the brick on the right. Measure from that mark to the wood siding on the left. Are those measurements the same? You don't have to reinstall your door to make it centered, but you have to trim it out correctly with a reveal the same on each side.
I'm not sure if it was installed perfectly centered or not; my friend installed it years ago but I can check it. I didn't really follow your explanation on checking it. Can I just measure the gap between the outside of the door frame and the block to see if it's the same on both sides?
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Old 04-10-2019, 07:59 PM   #49
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Re: Need Help with Exterior Door Moulding


Do this. On the right side, the brick side....Place a piece of brick molding onto the front edge of the jamb, and flush with the inside of the jamb. See any of the front edge of the jamb? No, it is completely covered by the brick molding. Now, slide that piece of brick molding over to where it butts flush against the brick. Boom! See any of the front edge of the jamb now? Yes! You've just revealed some of the front edge of the jamb. That is your reveal. Measure it. Do as above to the other side. Place, slide, reveal, measure. Are those two measurements the same? If not your door is not installed centered in the finished opening. To complete your install, which ever side has the smallest reveal, that is the max reveal for both sides if you want it to look correct. Reveal must be same/same on both sides. If that means you end up having a 1" gap between the brick and the brick molding on the right side, that's what you're stuck with. 1" gap is too much. It would have been best, for the sake of a clean install, for your door frame to be installed centered in the finished opening. Brick on one side, that painted siding or whatever it is on the other. That's just a for instance, you may not have a 1" gap. Measure. Do those measurements and check back

Now, I suppose some might disagree. The door frame should be centered in the rough opening, they might say. But if having it installed centered in the rough opening fubars the completion of the install? Forget the block, you will not see the block once your trim is installed. You will see the jamb, the reveal, the brick molding, and whatever gap you need to caulk at the brick.

Another thing that has escaped mention thus far. If there is some sort of siding above the door, flashing should be tucked under the siding and over your top horizontal piece of brick molding to shed water. Depends on what's up there.

Last edited by ZEW496; 04-10-2019 at 08:19 PM.
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Old 04-10-2019, 10:14 PM   #50
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Re: Need Help with Exterior Door Moulding


I can already tell you a pretty good approximation of your reveal on the right side, 1". I suspect the other side is less, 5/8", maybe? Not to worry, we'll get you worked out.
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