Is R-13 Decent Insulation? - Insulation - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum
Advertisement


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Insulation

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Display Modes
Old 08-31-2013, 11:36 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 142
Rewards Points: 87
Default

Is R-13 decent insulation?


I had to do some sheetrock repair in my house, and it gave me a chance to find out what kind of insulation it had. It said R13. Is that good insulation? What is it that they're using these days on an typical house? I've heard that R-30 exists, but I don't know if its true. I know very little about insulation.
Bennylava is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-01-2013, 05:51 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 37,138
Rewards Points: 1,916
Default


http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?...sulation_table

All depends on where the insulation was and what it was insulating and where you live?
It's best with questions like this to include your location in your profile. (not just mention it in your post.)
Just go to quick links to edit.
If this was inside a wall and the walls only 2 X 4 you can not simply remove the R-13 and expect to fit a piece of R-19 if both are fiberglass. R-19 is thicker. Compressed insulation does not work.
Want to add R value you would have to build out the walls or have the walls spray foamed.
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-01-2013, 08:22 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 142
Rewards Points: 87
Default


Sorry bout that I should have put more info. I'm in TX, so its regarding the heat. The R13 was in an inside wall, not facing outside towards the outdoors. So I see your point. You are saying that the insulation may be different on the outside walls, correct?
Bennylava is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-01-2013, 10:31 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,390
Rewards Points: 1,602
Default


Most houses don't even have insulation in interior walls. What rooms is this wall between?

R-30 Would be found in an attic or a basement ceiling.
mikegp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2013, 10:54 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 142
Rewards Points: 87
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by mikegp View Post
Most houses don't even have insulation in interior walls. What rooms is this wall between?

R-30 Would be found in an attic or a basement ceiling.
This is in a wall that runs between the living room, and the master bedroom.

I am curious though. What exactly, is the best insulation that you can put in your exterior walls, and attic? What's the best technology out there?
Bennylava is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 05:00 AM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 37,138
Rewards Points: 1,916
Default


I'd bet someone put that there to try and deaden the sound, so someone could sleep while people were in the living room. Only other reason would be if at some time this was an outside wall and an addition was added.
Here's some general info.
What insulation is used is decided by location in the home and your budget.
http://web.ornl.gov/sci/roofs+walls/...on/ins_02.html
Other things that have an effect.
Air sealing (sealing up any holes in the attic, walls, and crawl spaces where plumbing or wiring was run)
Proper roof venting. Must have soffits and some form or roof venting. I prefer a ridge vent so the whole roof gets vented.
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2013, 09:33 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 142
Rewards Points: 87
Default


No budget really. I'm willing to spend a lot of money to get my electric bill low.
Bennylava is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2013, 06:52 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,390
Rewards Points: 1,602
Default


I think closed cell spray foam will be your best bet if you really don't care about price. It air seals, insulates, and is a vapor barrier all at the same time.
mikegp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2013, 08:50 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 142
Rewards Points: 87
Default


Its better than any roll-out insulation? Like the pink stuff.
Bennylava is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2013, 11:09 AM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,390
Rewards Points: 1,602
Default


Much.
mikegp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2013, 07:19 AM   #11
Member
 
ccarlisle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 1,889
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default


Yes, technically, spray foam insulation is the best combined air and moisture-sealing method there is, but whether or not it is called for - or applies to your house - is another matter altogether. Have you had an energy audit performed recently?

An energy audit will tell you a lot about the application of several different forms of insulation in your particular circumstances, and explain to you the payback of doing a number of things to lower your energy bill. I mean saying spray foam is best is fine - but does it even apply to your circumstances is a question we cannot know; for example, would it go on the outside - or the inside - and then is it worth taking down all your walls, apply the foam then put everything back together. And have you air-sealed the best you can? An energy audit will tell you all this - and these guys are independent contractors so they have no dog in that fight...

Let us know.
__________________
“The average American woman is about 25 pounds heavier than she was in 1960...Recognizing obesity as a disease will help change the way the medical community tackles this complex issue that affects approximately 1 in 3 Americans,”
ccarlisle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2013, 08:43 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Texas
Posts: 31
Rewards Points: 46
Default


One trick I like to do on exterior wall remodels is to add a 1/2" layer of foam board behind the sheetrock. It's pretty cheap and goes up easy and works well with the existing insulation. It does two things: First it will add r-value to the wall, secondly it will greatly reduce what is called "Thermal Bypass". This is the heat flow through the wall studs that essentially "bypasses" the insulation. There can be be some challenges if you have doors/windows but outlets and lights are pretty easy to move out. Just use longer drywall screws and you are done.
AtticFoil.com is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2013, 03:41 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 182
Rewards Points: 150
Default


The foam board is a really good idea. Usually walls are done with r-19 and attics r-30 with vapor barrier being on living or warm side. Depends on location. I use the closed cell spray foam with some fiberglass on top. Stops all drafts and is your vapor barrier
romex1220 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2013, 10:29 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Fort Worth, Texas
Posts: 142
Rewards Points: 87
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by mikegp View Post
Much.

Ok well I wasn't really going to change my insulation right now, more just trying to learn something about insulation. So is R-30 about as high as the roll out stuff can go? Also, what would be the R-rating of the spray on insulation?
Bennylava is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2013, 09:39 AM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,390
Rewards Points: 1,602
Default


Quote:
Originally Posted by AtticFoil.com View Post
One trick I like to do on exterior wall remodels is to add a 1/2" layer of foam board behind the sheetrock. It's pretty cheap and goes up easy and works well with the existing insulation. It does two things: First it will add r-value to the wall, secondly it will greatly reduce what is called "Thermal Bypass". This is the heat flow through the wall studs that essentially "bypasses" the insulation. There can be be some challenges if you have doors/windows but outlets and lights are pretty easy to move out. Just use longer drywall screws and you are done.
Are you sure it's legal to have foam at the edge of electrical boxes? I think you'll need a box extender in that situation. Rigid foam is pretty flammable and creates very dangerous gases. I don't think many areas would let that fly.
mikegp is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Insulation question for vaulted home Talgonadia Insulation 3 08-22-2012 06:06 AM
?'s about foil-faced "bubble wrap" insulation badger73 Insulation 5 06-25-2012 05:09 AM
Several Insulation Quotes, Big Decisions to make knotquiteawake Insulation 2 05-04-2012 11:16 AM
Garage Insulation yamster Insulation 0 07-01-2011 01:30 PM
Rafter Vents and Insulation nofx1981 Roofing/Siding 15 03-10-2010 08:14 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts