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Old 12-18-2014, 11:17 PM   #1
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Floor Insulation


half my house is slab, the other half was a reno that was built on what I thought was a proper crawl space, approximately 10" higher than slab. So the raised portion (bedrooms) couldn't have been done properly. Now that cold weather is here, the floor is cold, and I'm getting mold growing at the edges of the floor (0 - 24" in) where furniture, clothes, etc are close to the ground and there is no air circ.
Unfortunately I'm not at a stage of ripping up the floor to see if there is anything between the joists and I have no access otherwise. Any direction that I should be looking at going to fix this issue?
My thought is that the subfloor comes up, foamboard placed between joists and sealed with expandable foam, than vapor barrier and subfloor back on. The drywall is coming down and I will be creating a full envelope in the bedrooms at the same time, as well as insulating behind that with pink (provided there is house wrap).
Hopefully this makes sense to someone out there
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Old 12-19-2014, 04:50 AM   #2
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It doesn't sound to me like this is just a problem of insulation. If there is enough moisture under the house to cause mold problems, that needs to be taken care of first. Also, a proper crawl space shouldn't be all that cold, but it will need more air circulation until things dry out. After that, it shouldn't be terribly cold.

Moisture problems in crawl spaces & basements are often caused by bad grading & gutters. Fix the grading. Make sure that any water can't get close to the house. Keep it running at least 18" away. Make sure the gutters are clean & delivering their water to working downspouts that empty well away from the house, too.
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Old 12-19-2014, 07:04 AM   #3
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Agreed. You have a bigger problem than just insulation. The mold is an indication there is a fairly constant level of moisture in these areas. You can live with cold floors if need be, but the moisture will eventually rot everything out. You need to figure out where that moisture is coming from and stop it. Humidity in the crawl space? Leak from the roof?
Grab yourself a moisture meter and start probing.
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Old 12-19-2014, 08:49 AM   #4
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sounds good. Will let you know one I an get down there in a couple months, Perhaps crawl space was a bad word to do since that gave people an idea that it was partially enclosed, instead of (what I believe to be there) 2.10's laying an inch above the ground, than subfloor.
Agreed though will definitly be looking for moisture under and fix that first. Roof 99% sure its good, and the house is at a high point on property. Will ask more questions when I have more info.
Cheers
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Old 12-19-2014, 09:45 AM   #5
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This sounds like a real pain in the butt problem. I've never understood crawlspaces with such limited access but I don't want to sound like a Monday morning quarterback either.

The previous commenters you're absolutely correct that this sounds like a bigger issue than just the insulation. You got to try to figure out where the moisture is coming from abate that issue, then insulate
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Old 12-19-2014, 05:00 PM   #6
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So an add-on to this. I've pulled off a lot of very well done renovations in my life, but I don't fully understand insulation, moisture and everything that goes along with it. So if I open up the floor and am able to only scratch my head, who is the person that I'mm gonna call? There are plumbers, electricians, contractors, gardeners, etc out there, never heard of insulator with the exception of the guy that spent money for spray foam equipment that may or may not know much more than where the trigger is. Would a general contractor be a go-to for advice or...? I just don't want someone that is going to tell me that his way is best because he has the gear.
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Old 12-19-2014, 06:31 PM   #7
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Take pictures and post them up here.

Good pictures and good lighting.
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Old 12-19-2014, 06:38 PM   #8
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It's usually not rocket science. Water runs downhill. Keep it away from the house for a while & see if things dry out. For a few hours work, a couple of yards of topsoil, & some gutter &/or downspout work, I've fixed a lot of moisture problems. My last house had a wet corner. Outside, there was a bad downspout & the previous owner had filled next to it & the foundation with mulch. I dug out the mulch, tamped in dirt, & fixed the downspout. That corner was dry as a bone after that.

A good contractor should be able to handle your grading & insulating problem, but a bad one will sound good & cost you a lot of money, so do your due diligence. The mold problem might take some more work, depending on how bad it is. I don't know about dealing with that.
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Old 12-19-2014, 10:19 PM   #9
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"instead of (what I believe to be there) 2.10's laying an inch above the ground, than subfloor." ----------- no plastic sheeting on the dirt...... ? That may be the biggest cause. Gary
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