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Old 08-02-2014, 12:25 PM   #16
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Good luck with the project. It'll be interesting to see and keep the thread updated with pictures if you can.
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Old 08-03-2014, 11:56 AM   #17
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Oh. Okay, that's closer. Just have to strike the 'to' and it's a proper English sentence. I was trying all kinds of combinations of commas and missing words.
So let me get this straight...you are posting in here and trying to get free feedback from professionals and then you effectively insult them by claiming their grammar is incorrect.

Amazing to put it mildly.

I guess all the building scientists are incorrect as well. Go ahead and correct Joe Lstiburek's English and see what what kind of response you get.

http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...vapor-barriers

Figure 6: Frame Wall With Cavity Insulation and Brick or Stone Veneer
Applicability – Limited to mixed-humid, hot-humid, mixed-dry, hot-dry and marine regions – can be used with hygro-thermal analysis in some areas in cold regions (Zone 5, but not Zone 6; see Side Bar 2)- should not be used in very cold and subarctic/arctic regions
This wall is a flow through assembly – it can dry to both the exterior and the interior.


http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...apor-retarders

Here’s what I wrote in response to Baumgarten’s question: “I have puzzled through the same question, and I have concluded that there is no reason for a foundation wall to dry to the interior, in spite of what you sometimes read. Walls insulated on the interior with closed-cell spray foam perform very well — and they certainly don’t dry to the interior.”
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Old 08-03-2014, 12:30 PM   #18
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So let me get this straight...you are posting in here and trying to get free feedback from professionals and then you effectively insult them by claiming their grammar is incorrect.
Well if you lot wanted to sound like professionals, you ought speak the Queen's English right proper.

Also, if you find having your command of language questioned an insult, you are a sorrowful person. Criticism is often unpleasant, but necessary; it performs the same function as pain in the body: it draws attention to an unhealthy state of things.

All current communications theory assumes failures in communication are the fault of the speaker. It is the speaker's job to select appropriate language, to use the language properly, and to adjust for the level of knowledge of the listener. I find two considerations on hand about this point:
  • The original response had a typographical error which was non-obvious. It was a sentence fragment given in response to a large number of statements, but without reference to which statement it addressed. It erroneously indicated an arbitrary member of a set ("any") rather than using a conjunction ("and")--which itself was erroneously placed at the beginning of a sentence (conjunctions don't do that).
  • No amount of Googling turns up the term "dry to" as used here with an explanation; the vast majority of results are irrelevant, and obvious errors made by non-native English speakers. Thus, if this is a technical term, it is not documented anywhere readily reachable.

Syntax and the use of jargon are primary concerns when discussing communications. In this case, the apparent jargon is still readily parsed, so not a concern; although the meaning interpreted by an unfamiliar listener adjusting the sentence may be different than the intended meaning. So maybe if there were a glossary of sorts somewhere, life would be a little less unpleasant. Unfortunately, while I can punch "rheostat" into Google and find out you mean some sort of potentiometer, I can't punch "dry to" into Google and get useful results, so the Internet didn't come with a ready-made glossary.

I'm pretty sure I'm paying for Google to know everything, somehow. It's got to be a line-item in my bill.

It doesn't help that text conveys about 7% of what's being said. When you talk to a person, 38% of the meaning conveyed is vocal--the way you speak--and 55% is non-vocal--everything else you do while speaking--while 7% is actually verbal. This allows people to work together without a common language in strikingly competent capacity, although it is annoying when you have to build a bridge with a Japanese man and you don't know Japanese at all. (Good time to learn.)

An amusing but unrelated point: the speaker-burden theory of communications is so non-obvious that people tend to assume foreigners are too stupid to understand them when they don't know a language well. It hardly occurs to most people that maybe they're not speaking clear {German,French,Korean} when visiting a country, as they assume the other party can figure out what they mean.
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Old 08-03-2014, 12:46 PM   #19
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I didn't take any offense to the original post so perhaps we should get back on topic.
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Old 08-03-2014, 12:48 PM   #20
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I didn't take any offense to the original post so perhaps we should get back on topic.
I was mostly making a joke at Websnooper's expense, because I've forgotten what the point of posting was in the first place. I didn't actually ask a question, don't know what I expected.
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Old 08-03-2014, 01:19 PM   #21
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Well if you lot wanted to sound like professionals, you ought speak the Queen's English right proper.

Also, if you find having your command of language questioned an insult, you are a sorrowful person. Criticism is often unpleasant, but necessary; it performs the same function as pain in the body: it draws attention to an unhealthy state of things.

All current communications theory assumes failures in communication are the fault of the speaker. It is the speaker's job to select appropriate language, to use the language properly, and to adjust for the level of knowledge of the listener. I find two considerations on hand about this point:
  • The original response had a typographical error which was non-obvious. It was a sentence fragment given in response to a large number of statements, but without reference to which statement it addressed. It erroneously indicated an arbitrary member of a set ("any") rather than using a conjunction ("and")--which itself was erroneously placed at the beginning of a sentence (conjunctions don't do that).
  • No amount of Googling turns up the term "dry to" as used here with an explanation; the vast majority of results are irrelevant, and obvious errors made by non-native English speakers. Thus, if this is a technical term, it is not documented anywhere readily reachable.

Syntax and the use of jargon are primary concerns when discussing communications. In this case, the apparent jargon is still readily parsed, so not a concern; although the meaning interpreted by an unfamiliar listener adjusting the sentence may be different than the intended meaning. So maybe if there were a glossary of sorts somewhere, life would be a little less unpleasant. Unfortunately, while I can punch "rheostat" into Google and find out you mean some sort of potentiometer, I can't punch "dry to" into Google and get useful results, so the Internet didn't come with a ready-made glossary.

I'm pretty sure I'm paying for Google to know everything, somehow. It's got to be a line-item in my bill.

It doesn't help that text conveys about 7% of what's being said. When you talk to a person, 38% of the meaning conveyed is vocal--the way you speak--and 55% is non-vocal--everything else you do while speaking--while 7% is actually verbal. This allows people to work together without a common language in strikingly competent capacity, although it is annoying when you have to build a bridge with a Japanese man and you don't know Japanese at all. (Good time to learn.)

An amusing but unrelated point: the speaker-burden theory of communications is so non-obvious that people tend to assume foreigners are too stupid to understand them when they don't know a language well. It hardly occurs to most people that maybe they're not speaking clear {German,French,Korean} when visiting a country, as they assume the other party can figure out what they mean.
You just made my point for me...again.

I don't think anyone that offers their advice should expect criticism in return (regardless of whether or not you are correct and they might be...as you have yet to demonstrate that to me...grammatically incorrect). Why don't you just thank someone for sharing their expertise and time about a subject matter that you have no dealing or experience in.

I think the poster mentioned that he answered from his cell phone. Cut him some slack for crying out loud as he/she clarified their early remarks. Instead of a thank you, you choose to insult his English.

Congrats...you are separating yourself from the pack when it comes to being unappreciative.

By the way, if you think a "mastery" of the English language somehow indicates a higher state for professionalism in the trades...you are quite wrong. I am not suggesting you contract with someone that cannot spell "cat", but you obviously have zero to little dealings with true professionals in the trades.

I can think of handful that are brilliant artisans that would probably get their writings picked apart if in a similar situation. They also wouldn't work for you because you appear to be, at least in this exchange, completely devoid of any humility which usually makes for a terrible client.

That combined with your argumentative nature would throw up a million red flags for most professionals.

Good luck with your project though and the moss insulation idea. When you have mold growing in the walls of the block is falling apart, be sure to use proper grammar when you are swearing.
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Old 08-03-2014, 01:35 PM   #22
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When you have mold growing in the walls of the block is falling apart, be sure to use proper grammar when you are swearing.
Irony.

Also, I'm well aware of what environments are conducive to black mold (everywhere) and stachybotrys (on wood or paper). I need 10mg of Loratadine every day after my landlord's contractors damaged the plumbing in my apartment while fixing the apartment below. When alerted to the mold issue, they simply put new sheet rock over the infested area and painted. Two years of constant exposure apparently developed an allergy, which is still bothering me in my house (due to wet basement issues--there is mold and plywood).

By the way, I'm also putting a bee hive right next to that wall. I'll prepare the swearwords for when the bees infest the wall and I have to dig out the hives, too.
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Old 08-03-2014, 01:40 PM   #23
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It'll be interesting to see and keep the thread updated with pictures if you can.
I'll have to make some decisions about how to do it first. The moss may require more shade than I'm expecting, so I may need the trees in place first. Not sure if it'll stick on its own.

There are a few places selling mats intended to adhere to cement walls and hold on moss covering:



Porous polypropylene mats, which absorb and retain more moisture to support the moss, accelerating growth.

The manufacturer recommends an adhesive to attach to concrete walls. Loc-Tite's permanent construction adhesives variably say to not use where continuously wet, or to not use on polypropylene; I can't find one that recommends use to bond porous polypropylene to porous surfaces where continuously subjected to moisture.
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Old 08-17-2016, 11:46 PM   #24
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Re: Cushion and Wall Moss


It's great what you've done! I look for a long time any information about using moss for outside insulation and it almost nothing. Mostly people writing just negative posts but have no reall experience. Is it really problem with insects?
I also plane to use this technology. how rains in autumn influes on insulation characteristics? Thank you very much for your information! Sorry for my not native english.
Please make pictures visiable again.
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