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Old 11-11-2014, 06:21 PM   #16
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Using the Canadian Tire "Indoor Temperature and Humidity Reader",

Master bedroom:

humidity level is 57% min, 71% max
temperature 20.9 deg C min, 21.8 deg C max

It appears the humidity is too high... comments?

I am now measuring other parts of the house. I will post numbers ASAP.
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Old 11-11-2014, 06:40 PM   #17
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Do you have a wet basement? Ridge vents?
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Old 11-11-2014, 08:29 PM   #18
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Do you have a wet basement? Ridge vents?
No roof ridge vents but basic roof vents. We have soffit venting on one side too, the other soffit has no venting.

Wet basement? When we get spring thaw, occasionally we have a small amount of water in one corner. Overall, not much of a problem.
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Old 11-11-2014, 08:53 PM   #19
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You mention a new furnace in reply #4. I am assuming this is a central heating unit with blower and duct work. Is there a remote possibility a slight positive pressure is being created forcing warm humid interior air out into the space between the storm and main door?
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:25 PM   #20
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You mention a new furnace in reply #4. I am assuming this is a central heating unit with blower and duct work. Is there a remote possibility a slight positive pressure is being created forcing warm humid interior air out into the space between the storm and main door?
Our newer high-efficiency forced-air furnace is a direct vent with combustion air drawn in from an outside pipe and then exhausted out another pipe. They installed the furnace using the existing duct work. I'm not sure if a positive pressure situation exists or not... I don't think so but I could be wrong.

The amount of ice and frost on the storm door can sometimes be 1" thick when it is really cold. We can extrapolate how cold the exterior air is from the amount of ice on our storm door, LOL!
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:40 PM   #21
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Kitchen (wife just made supper, boiling water):

humidity level is 66% min, 74% max
temperature 21.1 deg C min, 22.2 deg C max
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Old 11-12-2014, 05:59 AM   #22
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Obviously if you boil water it will create more humidity. You might start by putting a dehumidifier in the basement. Ideally humidity should be below 45%
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Old 11-12-2014, 07:46 AM   #23
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Quote:
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Our newer high-efficiency forced-air furnace is a direct vent with combustion air drawn in from an outside pipe and then exhausted out another pipe. They installed the furnace using the existing duct work. I'm not sure if a positive pressure situation exists or not... I don't think so but I could be wrong.

The amount of ice and frost on the storm door can sometimes be 1" thick when it is really cold. We can extrapolate how cold the exterior air is from the amount of ice on our storm door, LOL!
Any positive pressure will be caused by the duct blower rather than the combustion air system.

Example: if a room has a supply register but an inadequate or non existent return duct, the room will be slightly pressurized if the door to that room is closed. You can check this condition by nearly closing a door ( especially a light weight hollow core door ) and if a positive pressure is being created the pressure will move the door.
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Old 11-12-2014, 02:50 PM   #24
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Quote:
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I think the weather stripping is fine, I don't see any daylight coming through. What category would I look in the yellow pages for a thermal cam service? What does this cost? It would be cool to have my own camera, but I know they are pricey.
Call an energy consultant/consulting company and let them know your situation.
There is a lot of well intentioned but pretty grossly incorrect info that can be gathered on the web, so I'd definitely have a pro take a look before you spend too much time or effort. You can probably get someone to come and spend an hour with you with a thermal cam and the appropriate knowledge/experience to properly diagnose your issues for maybe $200 or less. ( A good thermal cam costs thousands).
A couple last observations: If those readings are accurate, your humidity is indeed very high. As I mentioned previously, the air sealing that you had done may necessitate some mechanical ventilation being added like a constant run bath fan or something along those lines. You can fix the spots where there may have been insulation missed, however that will not solve the moisture issue completely. For the time being, you could run an existing bath fan intermittently or run a dehumidifier to get the RH down. The appropriate RH level to get rid of the condensation will depend on the temperature, and likely be a bit lower than the 45% someone had mentioned if we are talking temperatures far below freezing.
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Old 11-12-2014, 04:21 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Howitzer View Post
Kitchen (wife just made supper, boiling water):

humidity level is 66% min, 74% max
temperature 21.1 deg C min, 22.2 deg C max
Using the link click on C at the bottom of the scales ( Temp. - RH - DP ) plug in room temperatures and humidity with Dew Point circle clicked and you can see the surface temperatures condensation will begin to form that attain that DP temp or lower.

21C isn't in an acceptable range for prolonged periods of time, but cooking meals will cause a temporary increase and is always acceptable.


http://dpcalc.org/
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Old 11-12-2014, 08:12 PM   #26
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Basement room with drywalled ceilings (directly below master bedroom):

humidity level is 61% min, 68% max
temperature 15.9 deg C min, 18.7 deg C max (our basement is quite cool).
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Old 11-12-2014, 08:20 PM   #27
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Call an energy consultant/consulting company and let them know your situation.
There is a lot of well intentioned but pretty grossly incorrect info that can be gathered on the web, so I'd definitely have a pro take a look before you spend too much time or effort. You can probably get someone to come and spend an hour with you with a thermal cam and the appropriate knowledge/experience to properly diagnose your issues for maybe $200 or less. ( A good thermal cam costs thousands).
A couple last observations: If those readings are accurate, your humidity is indeed very high. As I mentioned previously, the air sealing that you had done may necessitate some mechanical ventilation being added like a constant run bath fan or something along those lines. You can fix the spots where there may have been insulation missed, however that will not solve the moisture issue completely. For the time being, you could run an existing bath fan intermittently or run a dehumidifier to get the RH down. The appropriate RH level to get rid of the condensation will depend on the temperature, and likely be a bit lower than the 45% someone had mentioned if we are talking temperatures far below freezing.
Your advice has been great! So what do you suggest I do? I am contemplating a whole-house dehumidifier... is this a good idea?
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Old 11-12-2014, 08:21 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeniorSitizen View Post
Using the link click on C at the bottom of the scales ( Temp. - RH - DP ) plug in room temperatures and humidity with Dew Point circle clicked and you can see the surface temperatures condensation will begin to form that attain that DP temp or lower.

21C isn't in an acceptable range for prolonged periods of time, but cooking meals will cause a temporary increase and is always acceptable.


http://dpcalc.org/
Your advice has also been great! So what do you suggest I do? I am contemplating a whole-house dehumidifier... is this a good idea?
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Old 11-13-2014, 01:52 AM   #29
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Your advice has also been great! So what do you suggest I do? I am contemplating a whole-house dehumidifier... is this a good idea?
Unless it can be determined what's causing the high humidity and corrective measures taken it's looking as if a dehumidifier is the only solution.
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Old 11-13-2014, 09:53 AM   #30
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A dehumidifer will be a temporary solution, however whats needed is proper ventilation to address the overall indoor air quality. Did that energy audit that you had done have a blower door test? There is a range of airflow that is necessary for your home based on size, number of occupants, etc to maintain proper indoor air quality including the humidity levels.
I'd still recommend having a pro come out and take a look. At the very least it will provide peace of mind... I realize that this is a DIY forum, but this is something that could affect the health of your home and its occupants.
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