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Old 05-26-2013, 03:15 AM   #1
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Repairing drywall before placing tile


I am laying backsplash for the first time and making plenty of mistakes (but learning). I had to remove some tiles because they were not laid properly. In doing so, I pulled a couple chunks of drywall out as well. The damage is not large, probably 2" by 2" or so and is not full thickness but it definitely did pull out some of the gypsum.

My questions are:
1) I am assuming I should cut this out and repair it, correct? I'm guessing filling that area with anything is probably a poor idea.

2) Assuming I cut the area out and put new drywall, what do I do about the seams? I know you normally would put tape and then joint compound but I have read that joint compound below thinset is a poor idea. Should I just fill the gaps with thinset? Someone else suggested doing joint compound and then sealing it with something so thinset will go over it better.

Any help is appreciated!
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Old 05-26-2013, 08:51 AM   #2
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Without a picture it's hard to know just how bad it is.
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Old 05-26-2013, 09:52 AM   #3
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Here is the damage...

There is another spot on another wall that I cracked the gypsum prying a tile off but the paper is still intake and no gypsum is missing. The area is small and somewhat soft but intact. What should I do with that one?

Thanks!
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Old 05-26-2013, 06:11 PM   #4
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If it were me I would be tearing out that sheetrock and using a tile backer. Just that simple.
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Old 05-26-2013, 06:21 PM   #5
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Exatly what I was thinking. Trying to lay tile over that mine field would be a challange.
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Old 05-26-2013, 06:24 PM   #6
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I'm thinking that is what needs to be done. So you recommend replacing with concrete backer board? I know you don't necessarily need that for backsplash like you do in a tiled shower, but I guess I can just use it since I'm revising things anyway.

So, I have never used backer board. How do you cut it? How do I secure it to the studs? Do I have to seal the seams where it meets the cabinet/counter/door frame? Or, can I just put it on and put thinset and tile over it?

Thanks for your help!
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Old 05-26-2013, 07:17 PM   #7
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I would fill it with thin set and go on? It's just a backsplash not a shower.
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Old 05-26-2013, 07:21 PM   #8
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I tend to agree...now sure what the downside to just putting drywall and thinset over it is in this instance. If anyone objects to just screwing up drywall and putting thinset and tile over that please speak up!
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Old 05-26-2013, 08:11 PM   #9
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thinset would be fine, I always have a bag of ez-sand 45 at reach. I would skim it with that first to smooth it out, then tile.
But if for some reason I could not reach my 45, thinset only would not ruin my day.
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Old 05-26-2013, 08:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDIYer View Post
I'm thinking that is what needs to be done. So you recommend replacing with concrete backer board? I know you don't necessarily need that for backsplash like you do in a tiled shower, but I guess I can just use it since I'm revising things anyway.

So, I have never used backer board. How do you cut it? How do I secure it to the studs? Do I have to seal the seams where it meets the cabinet/counter/door frame? Or, can I just put it on and put thinset and tile over it?

Thanks for your help!
What i would use is USG's Fiberrock aqua tough backer board it is a hybred of backer board and sheetrock screw tape and texture like sheetrock paint it or tile it.
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Old 05-26-2013, 09:00 PM   #11
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Get a can of this stuff to seal the damaged board:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...wL._SY450_.jpg

Then level everything with with a skim coat of Durabond.
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Old 05-26-2013, 09:18 PM   #12
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UM no sheetrock is not meant for tile unless you use a real sealer like hydroban made by Laticrete at 75 a gallon. Use backer board that is what it is meant for do it right the first time.
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Old 05-26-2013, 09:36 PM   #13
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A back splash is not subject to moisture like a shower would be.
Just tile and glue is fine in most cases, I would never consider going out of my way to install hardibacker for a back splash, but not a terrible idea.
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Old 05-27-2013, 12:12 AM   #14
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I don't use hardiboard for back splash I use fiberock aqua tough from USG it handles like sheetrock works like backer board. and I use it for all my back splash work.
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