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Old 06-17-2020, 11:57 AM   #1
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Need Pro Advice On Ceiling Drywall


Hello. I recently removed a wall from between our dining room and kitchen. Unfortunately, the ceiling in the kitchen is approximately 3/8” thicker than the ceiling in the dining room. It looks like, for some reason, the previous owner attached another layer of drywall in the kitchen ... perhaps water damage or smoke/fire damage. Do I need to remove the ceiling in the kitchen and reinstall drywall to match the thickness of the dining room ceiling. Seems like a lot of additional work. Or is there a way to blend the two thicknesses? Would a blended 3/8” difference be noticeable? Thanks in advance to anyone who can provide me with some constructive advice.
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Old 06-17-2020, 12:08 PM   #2
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Re: Need Pro Advice On Ceiling Drywall


You can either tear the 3/8" off and see what's under it, (and repair it) or add 1/4 or 3/8" or 1/2" to the entire ceiling that needs it. It's a good idea to glue the drywall between joists when overlaying a ceiling. I'd probably tackle whichever room is smaller.
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Old 06-17-2020, 05:07 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
You can either tear the 3/8" off and see what's under it, (and repair it) or add 1/4 or 3/8" or 1/2" to the entire ceiling that needs it. It's a good idea to glue the drywall between joists when overlaying a ceiling. I'd probably tackle whichever room is smaller.
Thanks! That’s all I needed to hear! I was able to remove the 3/8” layer from the kitchen ceiling in less than an hour. No major damage to the ceiling that remained. Although, you can see that cracked seams and a few small holes need to be repaired and smoothed out. I have also noticed that there are areas that are cracking and peeling. These areas seem to have a very smooth and glossy ceiling surface underneath. I’ve noticed a similar situation on the nearby lavatory ceiling. Would the smooth/glossy surface be the reason for the cracking peeling paint or is the paint job just really old. If it is the reason, how would suggest that I ensure that it doesn’t happen again. I plan on repairing the ceiling and simply applying a skim coat to it. Would that be enough to do the trick? Like I said, the ceilings probably haven’t been painted in 15 years; so, I’m wondering if that would be the reason for the cracking and peeling.
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Old 06-17-2020, 05:35 PM   #4
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Re: Need Pro Advice On Ceiling Drywall


Good job!

Hard to say without a picture. Are you sure it is drywall or could it be plaster? Drywall will usually have 4 ft long seams. Gypsum lath was used with plaster veneer prior to drywall. (1950s) It looks like drywall but the pieces are smaller.

Sometimes surfaces that were painted with latex over oil based paint will peel because the oil based paint is so slick it doesn't bond. Or it could indicate a moisture problem. Or it could be veneer plaster peeling off. Depends on what you have... the age of the house might help.

Last edited by XSleeper; 06-17-2020 at 05:37 PM. Reason: Added thought...
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Old 06-18-2020, 08:06 AM   #5
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Re: Need Pro Advice On Ceiling Drywall


Or it could just be the ceiling sagging over the years.
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Old 06-18-2020, 09:51 AM   #6
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The house was built in 1947. So, you’re saying that it’s likely gypsum. Is that why it seems a little heavier than drywall? Like you said, it does look like drywall for the most part. I have noticed that there are two layers. In the corners (wall-to-wall and ceiling-to-wall) there is a metal mesh that is sandwiched in between the two layers. I am beginning to believe that this also a situation where the homeowner tried to paint over oil-based paint. When I removed a cabinet from the wall, I discovered a section of wall that had both the original wall surface as well as a section of painted wall surface. The original wall surface is a dull flat surface. The painted portion of that same wall is the glossy slick surface, the same surface that I’m finding directly underneath the sections of peeling ceiling paint. So, I’m assuming that I just can’t scrape the peeling paint off and skim coat/paint these areas. Are there any procedures and products that would be recommended for addressing the oil-based paint before skim coating and painting?
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Old 06-18-2020, 10:06 AM   #7
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Re: Need Pro Advice On Ceiling Drywall


The metal mesh you found in the corners are Corner - Rite's & were used in conjunction with Rock Lath & Plaster.
If you look at a cross section if it is Rock Lath you would see 3/8" Gypsum board (looks like sheet rock) than a 3/8" Gypsum Plaster base applied over the Rock Lath, next coat would be a thin white coat of Lime Plaster about 1/8" thick.
Yes there is a product that can be applied over a painted Plaster surface.
It is Master of Plaster high cost for material but well worth the money for a smooth finish.
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Old 06-18-2020, 10:09 AM   #8
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Re: Need Pro Advice On Ceiling Drywall


Yep, that's typical for a post wwII house. Anything that is peeling, yes you need to scrape it off. Use a stiff putty knife and chip away at it until it no longer chips off.

If you are concerned about lead paint in your home during your rennovation, see this site.

I would probably prime the slick oil based paint with an oil based primer like Kilz original. It will leave a flat finish that your joint compound will stick better to. You could also use Gardz, but it is kind of a pain to work with because it's so runny.

Then you can prime over your drywall repairs again with most any kind of primer before you paint. You do that so that the sheen of your topcoat isnt affected.
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