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Old 04-09-2019, 11:05 PM   #1
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Drywall damage


I have this damage on my drywall between wall and ceiling. Drywall damage-img_2592.jpg
I have tried to fix this issue a total of three times already it always coming back. I used fiber mesh tape this time. The last two time I use drywall paper tape and the tape will lift off.
Anyone know what cause this? Above the ceiling is my roof. No issue with my roof.


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Old 04-09-2019, 11:08 PM   #2
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Re: Drywall damage


Upstairs floor?
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Old 04-09-2019, 11:08 PM   #3
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Re: Drywall damage


Is the roof structure, engineered trusses.
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Old 04-09-2019, 11:10 PM   #4
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Re: Drywall damage


Google Truss Uplift.
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Old 04-10-2019, 09:35 AM   #5
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Re: Drywall damage


Wow. Not to derail this thread, but the things you can learn here in these forums, a wealth of knowledge. Sometimes it is reassuring and can guide you to solving a problem or making a repair. Sometimes, gotta admit, it gives me butterflies in me stomach. I have trusses, '64 home, luckily I haven't seen any sign of truss uplift, and would think it would have shown by now. Fingers crossed.

I searched truss uplift. Apparently, though it isn't structurally catastrophic, there is nothing you can do about it if you have that problem? Wood is going to expand and contract with the seasons.

One gentleman had an interesting idea. Install crown molding independent of the trusses to which the ceiling drywall is attached. The crown is fastened only to the stud walls. Leave a gap at the top of your crown, and not just a small gap. Leave a gap large enough to slide in rope lighting. That way you've turned a minus into a plus, lemons to lemonade. Before you install the crown you would need to de-couple the wall board at the inside corner where wall meets ceiling. That way, when the truss flexes upward it is independent of the wall and will not crack.

Anyway, good luck OP.
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Old 04-10-2019, 06:05 PM   #6
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Re: Drywall damage


Itís an upstairs room but I donít think I have truss uplift. Here is a picture of my ceiling from a repair when I took the drywall out
Drywall damage-img_2408.jpg

My house is build in the 60s. It have a flat roof.

I also have this issue in my other bed rooms and the stair ceiling. One of the bed room I actually got sick of it and installed crown molding.
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Old 04-10-2019, 09:54 PM   #7
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Re: Drywall damage


Lot of moisture in that space. Did you take out the insulation already for that picture? I am guessing yes. Seems to be a good bit of staining on the decking there.

Still can be a moisture issue with dimensional changes regardless if its truss or common rafter construction.
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Old 04-10-2019, 10:32 PM   #8
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Re: Drywall damage


Quote:
Originally Posted by ZEW496 View Post
Wow. Not to derail this thread, but the things you can learn here in these forums, a wealth of knowledge. Sometimes it is reassuring and can guide you to solving a problem or making a repair. Sometimes, gotta admit, it gives me butterflies in me stomach. I have trusses, '64 home, luckily I haven't seen any sign of truss uplift, and would think it would have shown by now. Fingers crossed.

I searched truss uplift. Apparently, though it isn't structurally catastrophic, there is nothing you can do about it if you have that problem? Wood is going to expand and contract with the seasons.

One gentleman had an interesting idea. Install crown molding independent of the trusses to which the ceiling drywall is attached. The crown is fastened only to the stud walls. Leave a gap at the top of your crown, and not just a small gap. Leave a gap large enough to slide in rope lighting. That way you've turned a minus into a plus, lemons to lemonade. Before you install the crown you would need to de-couple the wall board at the inside corner where wall meets ceiling. That way, when the truss flexes upward it is independent of the wall and will not crack.

Anyway, good luck OP.
Truss lift doesn't happen to every house, some times we have lot's of the same house in an area all with the same trusses and one suffers lift.
It sometimes get older houses when more insulation is added to the attic so it might be about the bottom member being warmer than the rest.
Now the drywall guys don't screw the drywall close to that inside wall and it is held up with the board on the wall so when lift happens the board flexes and you never notice.
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Old 04-10-2019, 10:52 PM   #9
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Re: Drywall damage


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Originally Posted by Windows on Wash View Post
Lot of moisture in that space. Did you take out the insulation already for that picture? I am guessing yes. Seems to be a good bit of staining on the decking there.

Still can be a moisture issue with dimensional changes regardless if its truss or common rafter construction.


Yes I had a leak on my roof in that room. I had to take out the ceiling drywall and insulation. I have no attics on my roof.




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Old 04-10-2019, 10:55 PM   #10
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Re: Drywall damage


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nealtw View Post
Truss lift doesn't happen to every house, some times we have lot's of the same house in an area all with the same trusses and one suffers lift.
It sometimes get older houses when more insulation is added to the attic so it might be about the bottom member being warmer than the rest.
Now the drywall guys don't screw the drywall close to that inside wall and it is held up with the board on the wall so when lift happens the board flexes and you never notice.


Drywall damage-img_2595.jpg

This is from my stair ceiling about the lifted tape. During the summer time it shows more lifted and on winter itís less. I assume itís the wood causing this? Donít mind me on the poor paint job too



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Old 04-10-2019, 11:14 PM   #11
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Re: Drywall damage


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Originally Posted by dws780 View Post
Attachment 555929

This is from my stair ceiling about the lifted tape. During the summer time it shows more lifted and on winter itís less. I assume itís the wood causing this? Donít mind me on the poor paint job too



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There are things we like to see in a system that we don't see here so somewhat a guessing game



We would like to see an addiquit amount of insulation with room above it for air flow and vents at each end of the joist bays to feed cool air in to cool the roof and remove any moisture that gets in there.


We would also like to see every hole thru the ceiling to be sealed around pipes, wire, and what ever because most of the moisture comes from the house.


That said, if there has not been a problem for 50 years and then this happens, what has changed in the last few years. A new roof in the last few years, drywall repaired or replaced on the ceiling? A different heat source in the house? New better sealed windows?
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Old 04-11-2019, 03:15 AM   #12
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Re: Drywall damage


I actually did a full rebahab on the whole house 10 years ago. So new roof, but not it wasnít rip out to the bare wood; just new layer of rubber.
There is no ducts above that wall but maybe just some electrical wires. As for insulation I think thereís 1/2 - 1Ē clearance for air flow.


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Old 04-11-2019, 03:20 AM   #13
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Re: Drywall damage


Forget to mentioned I have new doors/windows and central air. House did not have central air before. I think those lifted tapes came on 2-3 years after the rehab.


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Old 04-11-2019, 09:39 AM   #14
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Re: Drywall damage


Quote:
Originally Posted by Nealtw View Post
Truss lift doesn't happen to every house, some times we have lot's of the same house in an area all with the same trusses and one suffers lift.
It sometimes get older houses when more insulation is added to the attic so it might be about the bottom member being warmer than the rest.
Now the drywall guys don't screw the drywall close to that inside wall and it is held up with the board on the wall so when lift happens the board flexes and you never notice.
In the winter, the upper parts of the trusses contract because they are very cold. The lower horizontal section of the truss directly above and in contact with the finished ceiling, radiant heat from inside the heated area and insulation holding that heat causes it to expand, or it simply does not contract at the same rate as the upper truss. It can't expand outward with enough force to overcome the cold contracted wood, so it can only expand upward...or something like that? For years in an older home there may be insulation in the attic, but only between the bottom of the truss, the top edge of that bottom piece exposed to cold. New insulation, such as a new blown in insulation, now the bottom of the truss is no longer exposed to the cold temperature and could then hold the heat and no longer contract with the upper truss system. So an improvement, adding blown in insulation to your attic, can actually cause a negative side effect of causing truss uplift? Wow, who knew. Seems a damned if you do damned if you don't situation.
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Old 04-11-2019, 09:47 AM   #15
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Re: Drywall damage


Quote:
Originally Posted by ZEW496 View Post
In the winter, the upper parts of the trusses contract because they are very cold. The lower horizontal section of the truss directly above and in contact with the finished ceiling, radiant heat from inside the heated area and insulation holding that heat causes it to expand, or it simply does not contract at the same rate as the upper truss. It can't expand outward with enough force to overcome the cold contracted wood, so it can only expand upward...or something like that? For years in an older home there may be insulation in the attic, but only between the bottom of the truss, the top edge of that bottom piece exposed to cold. New insulation, such as a new blown in insulation, now the bottom of the truss is no longer exposed to the cold temperature and could then hold the heat and no longer contract with the upper truss system. So an improvement, adding blown in insulation to your attic, can actually cause a negative side effect of causing truss uplift? Wow, who knew. Seems a damned if you do damned if you don't situation.
I am in a house with crown molding at the ceiling and they open up every year. Because most framers nail the truss to the interior walls with toe nails, sometimes the wall goes up with the trusses and pulls the bottom plate away from the floor, then you get floor squeaks.
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