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-   -   How To use a router to make crown moulding (http://www.diychatroom.com/f98/how-use-router-make-crown-moulding-50916/)

Leah Frances 08-14-2009 08:50 PM

How To use a router to make crown moulding
 
Problem: my historic house has crown moulding that is unique - store bought moulding has wrong proportions and shallow spring angles.

Here's the three piece unit I need to recreate. The right side is the 'low run'.
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...ginal-situ.jpg

1. I glued up some 2x2x36 poplar stock so it would be easier to run through the router.

2. I marked the stock with the original pattern:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...k-original.jpg

3. Using my table saw I eased the waste corner of the stock so the router will have less work to do:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...le-saw-cut.jpg

Leah Frances 08-14-2009 08:55 PM

How to use a router to make crown moulding 2
 
4. Using the bit for the lowest cut I make the first pass:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...1-original.jpg

5. Using the bit for the next cut I make the second pass

6. Using the table saw I make an angle cut and a straight cut to separate the moulding from the stock.

Here is the original with the recreation:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...recreation.jpg

It's not a perfect match, but it's in the ballpark

Leah Frances 08-14-2009 08:59 PM

How to use a router to make crown moulding 3
 
For the top run I used some bigger stock to start:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...k-original.jpg

1. Marked the pattern on the stock

2. Eased the corner with the table saw:

http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...-table-saw.jpg

3. My first bit required more than one pass. I started with the bit in a low position and slowly increased it's height for successive passes:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...run-pass-1.jpg

Leah Frances 08-14-2009 09:03 PM

How to use a router to make crown moulding 4
 
4. I changed bits for the second pass - I had to slow down the router for the bigger bit:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...run-pass-2.jpg

5. Pass 3 also required changing the height of the bit some.

Here's the almost final product with the original:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...recreation.jpg

It still needs some fine tuning - but this procedure yielded me a finished product in my test runs that I will be happy using. Next step is to go into mass production.

Nathan 08-15-2009 12:09 AM

Great walk through... thanks for adding that!

Termite 08-16-2009 10:11 PM

Glad it worked out for you Leah, I have to admit my previous skepticism! You did well.

Question...How are you going to cut the back of the crown from the patterned piece you show in the last picture. I'd be really concerned with the safety of doing it on the tablesaw. That would be a kickback waiting to happen.

Or with the overall projection of the three piece crown do you have enough room to basically leave it as it is and hang it? :thumbsup:

Leah Frances 08-18-2009 12:16 PM

Termite - allay your fears. I'll post the pics of cutting the moulding free. I assure you - it's Team Safety First at my house.

DIYtestdummy 08-18-2009 05:48 PM

SWEET! :thumbup:

I've been thinking about doing the same for my base molding, since nowhere local has anything I want. Now that I am back on my feet (sprained foot), I have a new router plate that fits in my saw table and I've been planning jigs and sleds and bits...OH MY!

Leah Frances 08-19-2009 07:44 PM

Cutting moulding from the stock -
 
Here are the next steps:
6. Using a slightly canted angle (I used 7 degrees) and set the desired depth, I make the first cut to separate the top of the moulding from the stock:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...lank-cut-1.jpg

7. Using a 45 degree angle and setting a deeper depth I make a second cut for the 'back' of the moulding:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...lank-cut-2.jpg

8. Using the same 7 degree angle I separate the moulding from the stock with the final cut:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...lank-cut-3.jpg

Doing it in this order allowed me work both sides of the stock without ever making any risky cuts.

I ran 56 feet of one pattern today. I have a 'helper', an 11 yo who lives on my street. Tomorrow, her job is to do some light sanding and prime the moulding I made today!

havcel 12-21-2009 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Leah Frances (Post 314562)
4. I changed bits for the second pass - I had to slow down the router for the bigger bit:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...run-pass-2.jpg

5. Pass 3 also required changing the height of the bit some.

Here's the almost final product with the original:
http://www.diychatroom.com/members/l...recreation.jpg

It still needs some fine tuning - but this procedure yielded me a finished product in my test runs that I will be happy using. Next step is to go into mass production.

Now That's a router table !!! I made crown molding on my table saw. The more of an angle of the wood , the larger the radius. Takes a number of passes, But at the time I was happy of the results. Then I used my router for the more intricate cuts. Thanks for your info.

Red Squirrel 12-24-2009 12:18 PM

Wow that's awesome! I've always wondered how custom moulding could be made. Can you actually operate a table saw safely alone or do you need someone guiding the lumber as you push it through? I'm thinking about the very long 8' + pieces, I'm sure it's a task to maneuver it when the table saw is 8-9 feet from you.

TBFghost 03-20-2010 08:13 PM

... A router table can be used to make moulding, but it is not the best machine for the job. A Moulder is...such as a williams & hussey/shop fox or grizzley etc. If you don't want to buy these machines...which are really not that much money, as you can get them for 500-700 off Craigslist...I would find a local millwork shop and have them custom make you anything you want. You will get much better and more professional results, save your self time and aggrivation.:whistling2:

tpolk 03-20-2010 08:25 PM

leah great job. the previous poster is right that if you are going to try to match custom crown, bedmold and other types of profiles invest in a molder you will be glad you did. I worked at a custom millwork shop doing restorations on Monticello in charlottesville va. we used to grind our own knives to cut long ago profiles to match, these days you can go to a shop that does restoration and if they dont have the knife in their system you can give them your profile and a computer will cut the knife profile for you. you have a great set up there but think about just setting up one time with one knife . once you try it you'll never look back. peace timothy

Leah Frances 03-20-2010 11:56 PM

Thanks for the advice - my local millwork shop wanted $400 before they would even look at anything. So I DIY'd.

If I ever need to make any more than 25-50 linear feet I will use this method again.

H. A. S. 08-19-2010 10:48 AM

Fantastic tutorial, Leah!:thumbsup:

Personally, I hate to do moldings. I love the set-up, cutting parts....just hate the sanding and finishing.:censored:


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