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Old 02-15-2010, 10:12 PM   #61
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non-electric ceiling fan???


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Originally Posted by LittleJohn View Post
Hey there is a guy from the Netherlands who built a weight driven fan that looks really cool. His name is Steven Kessel and he called his fan the ventilator. Supposedly you have to crank the weights up for a few minutes but it will keep the fan moving for an hour or more. If you Google his name and ventilator you can find some pictures and preliminary sketches of his design. I would love to build one of these. Good Luck
I would love to enjoy the breeze coming out of one of these. But I'd need (to hire) someone to crank it up for me every hour or so. I'm a lazy person.!

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Old 02-21-2010, 08:00 PM   #62
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non-electric ceiling fan???


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Originally Posted by LittleJohn View Post
Hey there is a guy from the Netherlands who built a weight driven fan that looks really cool. His name is Steven Kessel and he called his fan the ventilator. Supposedly you have to crank the weights up for a few minutes but it will keep the fan moving for an hour or more. If you Google his name and ventilator you can find some pictures and preliminary sketches of his design. I would love to build one of these. Good Luck
Thanks for the heads-up LittleJohn. I always appreciate new info on this subject and will look into it.

Keep 'em coming folks.
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Old 03-29-2010, 05:40 PM   #63
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non-electric ceiling fan???


I've wondered if a wind-up baby swing could be modified to make a fan of sorts. You know, one of those stand-mounted cradles that swing an infant back and forth after you wind a crank at the top. Seems as if the cradle could be replaced with a paddle of some kind, and the whole lot could be wall-mounted.
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Old 03-29-2010, 11:20 PM   #64
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non-electric ceiling fan???


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Originally Posted by equanimity View Post
I've wondered if a wind-up baby swing could be modified to make a fan of sorts. You know, one of those stand-mounted cradles that swing an infant back and forth after you wind a crank at the top. Seems as if the cradle could be replaced with a paddle of some kind, and the whole lot could be wall-mounted.

equanimity: You know...that's 'out of the box' thinking. I'm going to give this some thought. Don't know how practical the wall mount would be, and there is that loud tick-tick-tick as it unwinds. But just the alternate idea from a ceiling mount deserves a shout out.
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Old 04-05-2010, 06:51 PM   #65
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non-electric ceiling fan???


how about having your pulleys attached to an outside wind mill
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Old 04-05-2010, 11:38 PM   #66
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how about having your pulleys attached to an outside wind mill
I need a more reliable (mechanical) power supply. Do you know how much a wind turbine would cost? Tnx for the suggestion tho.
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Old 04-06-2010, 03:58 PM   #67
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There is a man in Duluth, Minnesota- He is a commercial Fisherman. he builds furniture, boats and is a very good Machinists. He Builds on Order Non-Electric Ceiling Fans that are spring (wind-up) powered and very long lasting. They have a long arm that goes into a square socket and you wind the spring up every hour.

Howards Fish House this is where you will find him.
WONDERFUL information. I've been searching for information on this subject for several years, infrequently.

We have an off grid cabin about 2 hours from Duluth, in Northern Wisconsin. Our bedroom is in a loft and the wood heat in the winter really heats the upstairs up way too well. Such a fan would be perfect to run 3-4 cycles thru before going to bed to cool things down a bit.

To the Georgia Tech student working on the project, plz keep updating us.

To Spark Plug, not everyone feels that technology is as wonderful and necessary as you do.

I can be reached at twintwelve1484 at ya who.
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Old 04-06-2010, 10:02 PM   #68
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non-electric ceiling fan???


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Originally Posted by just a guy View Post
how about having your pulleys attached to an outside wind mill
But when there's wind and a draft, there is no (urgent) need for a fan inside.!
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Old 04-06-2010, 10:28 PM   #69
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Originally Posted by Mikay View Post
WONDERFUL information. I've been searching for information on this subject for several years, infrequently.

We have an off grid cabin about 2 hours from Duluth, in Northern Wisconsin. Our bedroom is in a loft and the wood heat in the winter really heats the upstairs up way too well. Such a fan would be perfect to run 3-4 cycles thru before going to bed to cool things down a bit.

To the Georgia Tech student working on the project, plz keep updating us.

To Spark Plug, not everyone feels that technology is as wonderful and necessary as you do.

I can be reached at twintwelve1484 at ya who.

FYI Mikay: I sent you an e-mail.
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Old 04-08-2010, 08:56 PM   #70
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non-electric ceiling fan???


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But when there's wind and a draft, there is no (urgent) need for a fan inside.!
his original needs were to move heat back down from ceiling during heating season
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Old 04-15-2010, 09:57 PM   #71
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non-electric ceiling fan???


Great idea/thread! I didnt know there were others looking to make one.

The only way I can think of would be weights/pulleys or springs. I'd be interested in knowing how the GT student solved this.
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Old 05-13-2010, 10:24 AM   #72
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non-electric ceiling fan???


Here's a neat idea. Why not see if you can make a "stirling engine".

Since a stirling engine uses a closed loop of gas such as helium or nitrogen, and it gets its energy from a "temperature differential", I think it would be perfect for an application like this.

By having part of the engine on the bottom of the room (cold side) , and part of the engine at the top of the room (hot side) , the highest temperature differential will run the fan the fastest, and the fan will automatically slow down when the temperature is evenly distributed in the room. Of course, the components of the engine and the capacity of the gas will need to be properly sized and calibrated to be able to get the right amount of power for the fan, given the temperature differential in the room. This relatively small temperature differential should be enough to power a small ceiling fan.

You said that you are looking to cool down the top of the cabin in the winter from the "wood heat stove". You could mount one side of the stirling engine near the stove, and the other side of the stirling engine outside where it's cold. This would be really good in the winter, but not so much in the summer. But getting heat from a stove for a stirling engine and cooling it outside in the snow can produce massive amounts of power from such a huge temperature differential. Enough to run a generator and produce enough power to run the entire cabin, just from burning wood in the stove.

Pretty cool idea if you ask me...

Homer

Last edited by homerb; 05-13-2010 at 10:31 AM.
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Old 05-13-2010, 10:31 PM   #73
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O
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Originally Posted by homerb View Post
Here's a neat idea. Why not see if you can make a "stirling engine".

Since a stirling engine uses a closed loop of gas such as helium or nitrogen, and it gets its energy from a "temperature differential", I think it would be perfect for an application like this.

By having part of the engine on the bottom of the room (cold side) , and part of the engine at the top of the room (hot side) , the highest temperature differential will run the fan the fastest, and the fan will automatically slow down when the temperature is evenly distributed in the room. Of course, the components of the engine and the capacity of the gas will need to be properly sized and calibrated to be able to get the right amount of power for the fan, given the temperature differential in the room. This relatively small temperature differential should be enough to power a small ceiling fan.

You said that you are looking to cool down the top of the cabin in the winter from the "wood heat stove". You could mount one side of the stirling engine near the stove, and the other side of the stirling engine outside where it's cold. This would be really good in the winter, but not so much in the summer. But getting heat from a stove for a stirling engine and cooling it outside in the snow can produce massive amounts of power from such a huge temperature differential. Enough to run a generator and produce enough power to run the entire cabin, just from burning wood in the stove.

Pretty cool idea if you ask me...

Homer
Homer, thanks for the post. That's a good idea but can it be implemented? My hope, of course, is that you are an engineer and can do the calculations to build it. Any ideas on how and where to start? Would you think that the mechanics of a Stirling engine would be simpler than anything we've discussed here?
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Old 05-13-2010, 11:28 PM   #74
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O

Homer, thanks for the post. That's a good idea but can it be implemented? My hope, of course, is that you are an engineer and can do the calculations to build it. Any ideas on how and where to start? Would you think that the mechanics of a Stirling engine would be simpler than anything we've discussed here?
Glad you like the idea. I have no doubt that it can be implemented easily.

Unfortunately, I'm no mechanical engineer. I'm a Finance professor. But that doesn't stop me from projects like this.

I think it can be implemented simply and realistically. Much simpler than most everything else discussed here.

Here's a bunch of youtube videos I found on large stirling engines that would be practial enough to run a ceiling fan:





As luck would have it, here's a stirling engine fan!


This one is my favorite. Here's a really nice one with all it's intricate mechanical beauty. Engine kits like this can be bought on eBay for a few hundred bucks..



Let me know what you think!

If this were my project, I'd buy one of those beautiful stirling engine kits rather than building one from scratch, and use it as a display piece, powering the fan somehow, either with a belt and pulley system, or with two electric motors. (no batteries)

Running on heat from the stove, a stirling engine could power the entire cabin. Find a generator with a blown engine and hook up the stirling engine to it. Or hook up a few car alternators to it to charge up a bank of batteries with an inverter.

Homer

Last edited by homerb; 05-13-2010 at 11:37 PM.
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Old 05-14-2010, 08:38 AM   #75
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We have used picture B, they last about 5 years before they quit. We now have picture A, it is about dead. The fans are quiet and move a small amount of air, but it makes a difference. We hunt out of a 10x16.5 wall tent w/5foot sides. Even in zero temps, we are warm in our canvas tent with the fan on the wood stove.
The "ecofan" seems like the most practical fan to use.

Pretty neat.

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