Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Green Home Improvement

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 11-17-2008, 09:24 AM   #1
First-time Home Owner
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 44
Share |
Default

Cheap solutions


I'm sure the contractors all know about these, but I didn't, so I thought I'd post it here.

Simple energy savings: install foam gaskets around all outlets on exterior walls. A 6 pack costs about $2. According to government sources, they save 2%. Not much, but a cheap solution.

I was a little suspicious that this would actually be a problem, but I figured for a few bucks, I'd try it. We had 15 outlets on exterior walls. Most were somewhat cold when I put my hand up to them. 2 of them had actual AIR FLOW coming in. Go figure. I'd never have thought to check the outlets.

Anyone else done a cheap solution recently?
ciera is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 02:42 PM   #2
home improvement guru
 
aaron.klimchuk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
Posts: 44
Default

Cheap solutions


great tip, and its a simple DIY for any homeowner.
aaron.klimchuk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2008, 09:49 AM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 8
Default

Cheap solutions


Could you post a link and/or a picture so we can visualize what exactly you're talking about?

Thanks,
Cory
cmittle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2008, 06:18 PM   #4
Member
 
bofusmosby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Tampa Florida
Posts: 396
Default

Cheap solutions


Well, with me working on a shoe-string budget, when I saw the word "cheap", I had to see what it was about.
bofusmosby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-02-2008, 11:03 PM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 4
Default

Cheap solutions


Pleas post url or picture for which you use word "cheap", I want to see it.


Last edited by curtdave; 12-08-2008 at 12:04 AM.
curtdave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2008, 11:21 PM   #6
Member
 
fierysun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Vegas Baby!
Posts: 82
Default

Cheap solutions


I used latex expanding foam around the outlet box to seal it up. Unfortunately there was enough of a gap between the box and drywall to let me do this.

Nice gaps huh?


Box with latex foam around it.
fierysun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2008, 06:59 AM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 8
Default

Cheap solutions


I found a place that sells them.

http://www.reducemyenergy.com/draftproducts.htm

Scroll down a little ways and you will see they offer gaskets for outlets and switches too.
cmittle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-01-2009, 08:57 PM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Newport News, Virginia
Posts: 15
Default

Cheap solutions


I've been using the outlet sealers in my house. I find them to be a lot easier than using spray foam and a lot quicker. Even though I am using the decorator style switches and receptacles, I just use a utility knife to cut the foam to shape. Full installation of the sealers is less than 60 seconds.
Colchicine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 10:41 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 67
Default

Cheap solutions


Sounds like a great idea. Is it safe to assume they're not flammable? :-)
PirateKatz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2009, 10:48 AM   #10
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Newport News, Virginia
Posts: 15
Default

Cheap solutions


I don't know, I'll stick one to a flame this weekend and see!

Another advantage to the foam sealers is that it covers up all of the dead airspace that is IN the receptacle box. May not amount to much, but we are talking pennies here anyway.
Colchicine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2009, 02:27 PM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: West Michigan
Posts: 3,989
Default

Cheap solutions


I have a package of the 'electric outlet sealers', they're made by Frost King. I got them at Lowe's near the insulation department, in with the weather stripping and other weatherizing stuff. The package says they are 'Fire Retardant Plastic Foam'.

Quote:
Anyone else done a cheap solution recently?
In the plumbing department at Home Depot I found a 'Dryer Vent Draft Blocker'. It was $14.95. It has to be hooked up to the duct coming into the house that is attached to the dryer vent outside. The duct coming out of the dryer is hooked to the other end of it. There is a little flap on it that opens in only one direction so that when the dryer is on, the air blows outside, but cold air from outside can't come in because the flap blocks it. When I stand in front of my dryer, I can feel cold air coming in and the inside of the dryer is very cold when I open the door to put clothes in it. I haven't put it in yet, but I hope this little gadget helps with that. I also put one of these in the duct that takes the air outside when the bathroom fan is on. Has anyone else used one of these for their dryer and does it work?
gma2rjc is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.