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CowboyAndy 12-05-2008 07:51 AM

Building green on a budget suggestions
 
I am on the board of directors for our local Habitat for Humanity and would like to propose that our next house be "green". I dont know a whole lot about building green, so i'm looking for some suggestions. Budget s a big concern.

Any ideas?

aaron.klimchuk 12-16-2008 09:26 AM

here are a few articles I found which might be able to help you out...

http://www.content4reprint.com/home/...ower-plant.htm

http://personalitydisorders.suite101...efficient_home

http://www.associatedcontent.com/art...form_your.html

Marvin Gardens 01-09-2009 09:41 PM

Green costs money. Can't be on a tight budget and be green also. That might happen one day but that day is not here yet?

Tom Struble 01-16-2009 09:19 PM

not true there are alot of ways you can build green that aren't necessarily more expensive check out green builder magazine or mother earth news you just have to have the proper mind set and be open to ideas dont let anybody tell you its too expensive

concretemasonry 01-16-2009 10:38 PM

Habitat relies heavily on donations from suppliers.

You might get something from some "green" suppliers for one house or two to get quick publicity, but Habitat will not risk future donations from other long term suppliers.

It is a political tight rope to walk.

GreenSD 02-17-2009 01:48 PM

Green can be done on a budget. Green isn't only about PV Solar and wind turbines.

Low/No VOC paints like Fresh Aire. It's about $10 more per gallon.
Bamboo flooring / Stained concrete flooring
Low Flow Shower heads and sink aerators (My shower head cost $10.00)
Low flow toilets
Cellulose insulation rather than fiberglass
Compact flourescent light bulbs
Ceiling fans
Solar tubes
Hardie Planking exterior (which every Habitat house I've worked on used)
Passive solar design utilizing correct exposures and windows for air flow
Concrete or tile counterops vs laminate
On demand water heater
Drought resistant landscaping
Use Fly Ash concrete
Recycled ceramic tiles from Crossville cost about $4/sf

One of the best things I've seen: a single switch that shuts off every phantom electric item in the house with one flick. Things like coffee makers, cell phone chargers, etc. Things that are on even when they're off.

We worked on the Jimmie Johnson/Habitat house here in San Diego last summer and they did have a donation of PV solar and the house is set up for net metering.

We worked on Habitat houses on the San Carlos reservation after the wildfires and several of the houses were built using ICFs.

Termite 02-17-2009 04:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homecarecentral (Post 226527)
SIP's structurized insulated panels, are cheaper than traditional building methods...

I'm a huge fan of SIPs and advocate their use, but that just isn't true. I'm sure it varies somewhat from region to region, but around here when compared to conventional framing methods, the materials and labor costs of a SIP home will be 25% higher than the stick built home. That is a lot of money that would take years to recuperate in energy savings, although a SIPs house with 6" walls gets something like R38, which is nice.

JMD 03-11-2009 11:34 AM

These would be my suggestions:

Try looking into using different building techniques to reduce waste. Maybe a framing technique that requires less material while still being code compliant.

Make sure you are insulating properly, sealing ductwork tightly and sealing the building envelope properly. This can result in using less energy to heat/cool the home.

Try to use local products to reduce polution caused by transportation. This isn't just buying from a local store but for example getting wood from locally grown trees, milled locally, and from a local distributor. Easier said than done.

Finally try to reduce waste as much as possible. What was you end up with try to recycle or use on another project.

Building green does not necessarily have to be the products you use. Look to conserve or be more energy efficient in areas that may not affect your budget. Also make sure that the little things are done right. Not sealing the ductwork properly can lead to innefficiencies in your HVAC system. Not cauling propery and failing to seal penetrations can lead to air penetration that will make your HVAC system work extra hard to cool the outdoor air.

Leah Frances 04-17-2009 08:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GreenSD (Post 231845)

One of the best things I've seen: a single switch that shuts off every phantom electric item in the house with one flick. Things like coffee makers, cell phone chargers, etc. Things that are on even when they're off.

Ok, how do I get one of those? I would love to stop unplugging my toaster every day.

Wethead 04-18-2009 10:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CowboyAndy (Post 194182)
I am on the board of directors for our local Habitat for Humanity and would like to propose that our next house be "green". I dont know a whole lot about building green, so i'm looking for some suggestions. Budget s a big concern.

Any ideas?

make sure the house has a fireplace.


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