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Old 02-29-2012, 04:13 PM   #31
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Wet Deck Roof


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Originally Posted by Windows on Wash View Post
+1

Not only did he attach them wrong but they are attached to the wrong locations.
As usual I need to ask, what does this mean? What locations?
Something else in addition to them being attached to the fascia board?

He postponed until tomorrow, so I am making sure I have all my roof ducks in a row.

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Old 02-29-2012, 04:28 PM   #32
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Wet Deck Roof


Should have been on top of the old roof, not attached to the fashia.
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Old 02-29-2012, 09:33 PM   #33
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So I am making a guess here in my final review..

If he attached properly to the room, I wouldn't have the mangled guttering..

The board bowing and cracking may not be a good thing.. and definitely is not a 5/8" solid substrate per manuf instructions either, separate and apart from the need for it to have been a structural grade...

The nails are a lovely touch...although I guess if I saw more in a uniform pattern, it means perhaps more would have been used in a uniform pattern.

And last but not least.. of course another question.., does this look like the beginning of the board pulling away, since its no longer evenly across?

So in conclusion, its not to good construction practice, not to manufacturers guidelines, code <awaiting their new response> and just plain old common sense...

Armed with all of the information I have gotten here, and some addl research of my own.. it will make for an interesting discussion tomorrow.
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Wet Deck Roof-boardtofascia.jpg   Wet Deck Roof-boardtofasciacloseup.jpg   Wet Deck Roof-bowingcrackingplywood.jpg   Wet Deck Roof-crackingplywood.jpg   Wet Deck Roof-gutter1.jpg  

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Old 02-29-2012, 09:34 PM   #34
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Wet Deck Roof


last pic
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Old 02-29-2012, 09:58 PM   #35
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There are so many things wrong. They did not know enought to go up 2' intot the roof and that mess is obviously nailed into the fascia. They knew that was wrong so they added blocking and nailed it to death too.

"So in conclusion, its not to good construction practice, not to manufacturers guidelines, code <awaiting their new response> and just plain old common sense..."
That sums it up. A carpenter could talk code and explain it better than I can. Not being sure of code facts, my common sense would have given a 400% better job. Too flat for barn metal. Not tied into the roof nor the house properly, etc. Wrong materials, et al.

You know, I've never seen anybody put 6+ nails in pieces of blocking like that either.
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Old 02-29-2012, 10:05 PM   #36
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Not structural, but I just noticed those random exposed screws through the T-111.
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Old 02-29-2012, 11:01 PM   #37
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Who suggested the T-111? Were you going for the exposted wood look on the ceiling for some reason? Or did they just do it that way?
If someone wants the exsposed wood look you use 1-1/2 thick X 6" wide T & G boards. That way the screws would not have been coming through and the roof would have been plenty strong enough.
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Old 03-01-2012, 07:32 AM   #38
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The unfortunate long and short of it is this....it needs to be completely torn down.

Right from the start, the structure is all wrong and if you build your house on a foundation of sand...it will fail.
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Old 03-01-2012, 12:50 PM   #39
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They also left a gap where water can run down the roof, miss the gutter and run down untreated lumber.
They know it's there because they tryed to fill it with foam.
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Old 03-02-2012, 06:27 AM   #40
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They also left a gap where water can run down the roof, miss the gutter and run down untreated lumber.
They know it's there because they tryed to fill it with foam.
That isn't how you do it?
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Old 03-02-2012, 11:15 AM   #41
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Silly boy.
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Old 03-04-2012, 12:28 PM   #42
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So..
to answer an earlier question.. the T1-11 wasn't my idea. It was suggested.
The use of it for decorative purposes to get more of that rustic look appears somewhat common around here.

The roof was also supposed to originally be asphalt shingles like the rest of the house. He switched gears on that, saying the metal would be a better roof for the deck.

We did have our meeting...The concise version

We broach the water issues. His moisture meter on a hot sunny day confirms to him that yes, there is a water issue. He is somewhat perplexed as he can't figure out after all they have done to fix it, why it still is happening. And that he will make it right, and its just murphys law at my home. Of course I expect out definitions of make it right to not be the same as we deal with this issue.

We go in the construction of the roof, pitch etc. His plan and what he thought he had was a 2/12. I'm like.. nope thats not a 2/12.. Does it look like that to you. After some internal calculating, he agreed. Then onto the T1-11, how its not a solid, structural 5/8 sheathing. Then onto the pitch in relation to the metal roof, the flashing job etc. And then a biggie-- it being connected to the fascia.

At that time <as it can change in a heartbeat> he was open to changing the roofing material. He suggested rubber. He was open to changing out the T1-11. And of course open to, and doing it, not the same. However, when it came to the fascia.. he saw nothing wrong in doing that. He's done it before. Its fine. He can add some brackets if need be. To change that, would require additional framing. Of course, this is not acceptable to me. He wanted to bring another roofing sub of his out to look at it, to get his opinion. He was going to do this on Wednesday, but I think he may have been out here already looking at it.

In the interim, I have begun making appointments with third parties <roof, construction> to come look at it. I did have a nice chat with a local framer here. He of course confirmed all the issues brought to light, and got me personally thinking the portion that is cut around the chimney as its over siding. On each side its attached to the fascia-- but I can't see especially since it is going over trim, where its connected in the center. So of course I wonder, is it just floating in the middle? What about loads and stresses and weight distribution? Then I get a headache.

We also had some bad weather, due to the tornado activity in our area Friday.
It gave me an opportunity to see fresh water infiltration in areas I haven't seen before-- down the white chimney trim, and more in the middle. Of course once it dries especially on the ceiling, you can't really tell to the eye. So this means there are more areas than initially thought that are getting wet.

The roof material also still does not sit firmly on the wood at the end of the roof. He previously said it was fixed, but its not either. If its raised up and you can see daylight, probably not good either.

Of course, what's a long boring post without pics-- and btw I did mention that area of gutter with the foam. He just kind of gave me a look.

I am just thankful that these issues have reared their head now, before its complete rather than 6 months down the road. I used to think having my home destroyed in a natural disaster was really bad. In hindsight, that's not as big as I once thought. Getting it rebuilt is worse.
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Old 03-09-2012, 10:37 PM   #43
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I need to impose on all of your great knowledge again..

Discussions have continued with the contractor, and of course it did not immediately result in a "we'll build it correctly"... He wants to salvage what he has..He admits he made a mistake with the covering, and in many contradictions that the pitch wasn't what he thought it was or should have been.. but other than that he feels its fine and dandy..

His solution is to put a rubber roof on it, and since it appears there is a gap between the two roofs, build some type of slope going from one roof to the other.. He says the rubber roof is an upgrade, and I will be getting that better roof for free. What a bargain . He feels there is nothing wrong with the flashing, but if there is, it will be fixed at the same time, as well as any damage the backflow of water caused to the regular roof.. And if I had any concerns about the structure he would add some lag bolts and try to make them look nice. He says now its attached to the subfascia so its structural and attached to the roof rafters through that. My first instinct and reaction was no as a) it sounds like masking issues to me b) it never was supposed to be a flat roof. and c) subfascia-how does that make it different.

So knowledgeable experts thoughts and opinions?

I have also felt compelled to have an engineer come look at it as well this coming week.

Going through the history of the project on what was built and what was supposed to be, as mentioned earlier it was not spec-ed out to be a flat roof. Even his sketch which he doesn't deny had a definite angle to it.
I was so wrapped up in water, those details were not forefront in my mind. It's noted as a shed roof system. I found these basic definitions--
Shed Roof: One high pitched plane covering the entire structure. Often used for additions and porches.
Flat Roof: Contains no slope. May or may not have eaves.


So am I correct that there is no way that can be considered a shed roof, since its flat?

As always thank you very much
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Old 03-09-2012, 10:48 PM   #44
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You are correct.

Is this an established contractor or umm let's say "start up" contractor?
Not sure if any permits were required or if anything was inspected but that is one thing to look at. Also it may behoove you to bring in an objective expert because you may end up threatening legal action against them.

As far as the roof, anything is an "upgrade" from the crap that's on there but rubber isn't an upgrade, it's just the cheapest thing he can put on there that is proper for a flat roof.
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Old 03-10-2012, 09:01 AM   #45
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An established contractor --even builds houses. He claims I am the exception to the rule, and this house is always Murphy's law...
There have been several issues, and this is just the latest...

A permit was pulled... and this part of the deck is just one part of a multilevel deck...the other is awesome.. looks like two different companies built it, not the same people.

Inspection, a final was done with the water issues present, and it not being complete, and it passed. The roof isn't even to code, due to its pitch with the material. I've been dealing with codes since December as well in one form or another on this. It should not have passed. He was advised he needed to fix the water.

I have had other roofing companies out this week...that's been interesting.. and as I mentioned am also having the engineer come out as well for his input on structure and structure regarding codes. So I have been having third parties come and give it a gander.

It will be an interesting week.

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