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Old 02-01-2007, 03:47 PM   #31
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Water in the insulation


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Originally Posted by AaronB View Post
Find the source of moisture infiltration and seal it off.
But isn't some water always in the air?

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Old 02-02-2007, 11:17 AM   #32
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Water in the insulation


Sure there is, but ambient moisture is not what we are generally seeing that causes excessive condensation in heat differential conditions.
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Old 02-02-2007, 11:54 AM   #33
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Water in the insulation


If your roof is completely finished, installing ridge vent would NOT be the way to go. If you are planning on reroofing it, then definately go with ridge vent.
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Old 02-02-2007, 12:55 PM   #34
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Water in the insulation


You can easily add a ridge vent, but still do not think it will solve your problem.
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Old 02-02-2007, 01:35 PM   #35
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Water in the insulation


If the ridge vent will not solve my problem, should I install it even if it can be done easily (by an expert)? Or what is the advantage of having it, if it will not solve my problem? Maybe it is better to wait until it is time to replace the roof?
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Old 02-04-2007, 09:46 PM   #36
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Water in the insulation


the biggest problem is probably the fact that you have insulation with the vapour paper on it, and not vapour barrier. The warm air is blasting right around the insulation - add to that the lack of ridge vents and voila.
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Old 02-05-2007, 07:04 AM   #37
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Water in the insulation


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the biggest problem is probably the fact that you have insulation with the vapour paper on it, and not vapour barrier. The warm air is blasting right around the insulation - add to that the lack of ridge vents and voila.
Yes, I understand that. I guess the problem is that my bathroom is right under that section of the house, though I do have exhaust fan there. Maybe I should start with painting the bathroom ceiling with some kind of special paint to prevent the moisture penetrating.
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Old 02-21-2007, 04:12 PM   #38
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Water in the insulation


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You will not dry out fiberglass with a dumidifier, no matter how long you use it. A dehumidifier is just that - it is not a dryer and does not have enough air flow or provide circulation. This is espeicially true if you have the wall finished or covered.
Depends on the dehu. Some have some pretty serious amounts of airflow. Some of the bigger dessicant units have up to 7000 cfm of airflow...probably adequate. I've dried out many fiberglass walls with our bigger dehumids (not the dinky little store bought ones...commercial restoration grade units. That being said...there are three things that are key to drying...

1) Heat. Most commercial dehumids work best between 80-90 degrees F. There are high temp versions that work up into the 110 degree range.

2) Airflow. You need airflow to help release the water from the materials and vaporize it into the air for removal.

3) Esposure. The more exposed the surface of the materials, the faster things will dry. It is possible to dry the inside of a sheetrocked insulated wall, but it takes massive amounts of BTU's and a boatload of airflow to do so.

The longer you leave the wet insulation in the wall with wood and cellulose (if you have sheetrock), the better chance to get mold and rot. It happens faster in warm weather and a roof gets warm without ventilation.

Absolutely 100% agreed. What I would do in this situation (attic) is to set up a drying furnace and pump a lot of CFM of hot,dry air up into the attic with some blowers to dry the space out. I'd lift the insulation up out of the bays and make sure there is airflow under the insulation as well as over it.

Once dry, I'd install top vents PLUS an active vent fan (tied into a humidistat and thermostat) to get active airflow thru the attic (ridge vents are not always enough as my extensive experience in treating moldy attics with them proves). Last but not least, I'd install a bathroom vent fan. The only "special paint" that will stop mold from growing is a product called Mycodyne (which yes, for disclosure purposes, I do sell). This will NOT waterproof the walls...it will stop growth for a minimum of 25 years (guaranteed) but I would STILL install a bathroom fan.
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Old 03-04-2007, 08:01 PM   #39
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Water in the insulation


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Once dry, I'd install top vents PLUS an active vent fan (tied into a humidistat and thermostat) to get active airflow thru the attic
The problem is that most of my attic is finished, and I don't even know what is above the sheetrock. The space which I can access is between the roof and the knee wall, so I don't think it would be a good idea to install a vent fan in that nerrow space.
BTW, I did install the ridge vent, but it didn't solve the problem, and the insulation is still wet. I opened it to let it dry, but I am afraid, as soon as I put it back, the problem will appear again. I wonder why it had to happen to me, and not to most of the other people. Tough luck...
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Old 03-22-2007, 12:00 PM   #40
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Water in the insulation


BTW, can the condensation be worse because I used plastic instead of styrofoam vent channels?

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