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Old 06-25-2009, 01:29 AM   #1
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Water and Ice Used as an Underlayment


I hope someone can answer my questions for my peace of mind.

I live in central Florida and just had a re roof done.
I wanted get the best possible job for high winds and longevity which I discused withmy roofer.


The area is 28SQ 4/12. I used Timberline Pretique lifetime High definition shingles.

My first question is on the Carlisle water & Ice protection (WIP) 100 granular surface which was use for the underlayment. The old shingles and felt underlayment was removed. The new (WIP) underlayment was installed on the entire roof overlaping one layer; the drip edge was then installed on top of the (WIP). A starter strip was installed along the eaves and then the shingles installed.
I was told the (WIP) was not a breathable material and would cause me problems in the future with rot, mold ext, due to moisture. Is this the case and do I have reason to be concerned?
About 60 to 70' of cobra ridgevent 3 was install.

My second question was about the starter strip. A starter strip was installed on the eaves but not on the rake; will this be a problem in higher winds for the extra protection against the heavier winds?


If anyone can give me input on these question. I would very much appreciate it. I am not a roofer.

Thanks Again

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Old 06-25-2009, 07:17 AM   #2
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Water and Ice Used as an Underlayment


Ice dam material is better in wind areas because it will not blow off even if the shingles do. And no, it does not breath, but if the attic is properly ventilated, that should not be a issue. Drip edge at the eves goes under everything, at the rake goes over the underlaymant. Starter strips are installed along eves, not along the rake.

Since the roof is already installed, the underlayment is not an issue, what's done is done. There is a breathable underlayment available that will possibly survive if the shigles are blown off. GAF Deck Armor is one, check their website. Up here, ice dam is required at the eves, the rake, the ridge, and at valleys. Underlayment over all that. The more decking that is covered with ice dam, the less potential for any water damage from leaks or blow off.

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Old 06-25-2009, 12:50 PM   #3
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Water and Ice Used as an Underlayment


You didn't mention anything about your Intake Ventilation.

As long as you have a Balanced, Intake To Exhaust Ratio, I would not be concerned about the breathability of the underlayment, due to the continuous air flow that should be moving through the attic from the Intake portals to the Exhaust Vents along the Ridge Vent areas.

Ed
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Old 06-25-2009, 09:26 PM   #4
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Water and Ice Used as an Underlayment


thanks for the input just bill and ed the roofer! I called gaf about the starter strips on the racks and was told that cement is allowed in Florida the meet the 130 mph wind protection.

I also spoke with the chief building inspector in my area and was told the drip edge can go on either way, on top of the wip or under the wip all the way around.

Ed the roofer, thanks for your input. I do have ventilation around the house in the soffits and ridge vents.

would installing an attic fan give me extra insurance.
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Old 06-25-2009, 10:10 PM   #5
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Water and Ice Used as an Underlayment


If you already have Ridge Venting providing your Exhaust, then if you insalled a Powered Attic Ventilator Fan in the roof, when it would turn on, rather than sucking the air from the cooler lower shaded extrmities of the soffit overhang vents, it would pull air from the shortest distance available, also known as the Pat Of Least Resistance, which would be the closest sections of Ridge Venting.

That is technically known as "Short-Circuiting" the attic ventialtion system.

So, no do not add multiple exhaust venting mechanisms, which goes against the accepted practices and theories of the ventilation and shingle manufacturers.

Ed
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