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-   -   Using vented drip edge (ever-flo inhaler)? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f9/using-vented-drip-edge-ever-flo-inhaler-132514/)

philipluckey 02-04-2012 11:58 AM

Using vented drip edge (ever-flo inhaler)?
 
My house (in southeastern Tennessee) was built in the late 1930s, and the roof has no overhang (no soffits). I'm having it re-roofed (stripping off the multiple layers of shingles down to the planking -- from what I can tell, there looks to be 3 layers of shingles, and the lowest level looks like ancient shingles from the 1960s, so yes, definitely in need of re-roofing). Also having gutters and several of the fascia boards replaced, too. The existing venting in my unfinished open attic space consists of 2 "not large" gable vents (one at each end of house). There's never been soffit venting, since there are no soffits.

As part of re-shingling, the plan is to add ridgeline vents. However, since the only intake would be from the gable vents, it doesn't seem to me that there would be sufficient airflow for decent ventilation. I've found information on vented drip edges (which add a lower source of intake air by retrofitting the intersection of the roof and the exterior wall), but I'm troubled by products like the Air Vent that have vents positioned basically over the gutter (and if the gutters are blocked or covered with snow/ice, might allow water to enter, in some instances).

I've discovered another approach, however, with products like the Ever-Flo Inhaler Vents. (Kudos on having a company name and product name that leads to Google results that mostly deal with respiratory ailments.) Here's a link: http://www.everflovent.com/pro_inhaler.html

This Inhaler vent basically goes BEHIND the gutter to feed air into the attic (the air actually enters underneath or below the gutter, as opposed to other vented drip edge designs where the air enters above the gutter). Use of gutter is optional in its use.

Seems like this would solve my ventilation problem. Anyone have experience with this approach or product?

Windows on Wash 02-04-2012 12:12 PM

What is wrong with the venting now?

Mold, mildew, etc?

This product works but is not cheap.

http://www.gaf.com/Roofing/Residenti...Flow-Vent.aspx

dmc@RCR 02-04-2012 12:28 PM

Either of those products should work for you. We have been installing similar systems, fabricating our own, for years. Nice to see more choices by manufacturers.
Do you really get much snow in southern Tenn.?:eek:

Windows on Wash 02-04-2012 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dmc@RCR (Post 844021)
Either of those products should work for you. We have been installing similar systems, fabricating our own, for years. Nice to see more choices by manufacturers.
Do you really get much snow in southern Tenn.?:eek:

We fab our own up too but those systems do work pretty well.

Anything PVC ain't going to be cheap.

philipluckey 02-04-2012 12:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Windows on Wash
What is wrong with the venting now?

Mold, mildew, etc?

This product works but is not cheap.

http://www.gaf.com/Roofing/Residenti...Flow-Vent.aspx

Appreciate the response. Mainly I want to protect my upcoming investment in putting on a new roof. I don't think the existing ventilation (as installed in the 1930s) is enough, if only judging by how ungodly hot it gets in the attic in summertime, and by noticing the "sap bubbles" on the rafters; there may be some darker mold/mildew patches on the underside of the roof decking (which is actually planking). And, as I understand it, the manufacturer's warranty on new shingles might not apply if there's improper or insufficient ventilation. Adding ridgeline vents is a step in the right direction, but not as useful without a plentiful "source" of cooler air -- at least, that's my understanding; if I've misunderstood how this actually works, I'm open to learning!

Thanks for the Cobra link! I'll check them out. (Pricewise, I don't mind paying a little more to extend the life and usefulness of the entire roof system, but yet I'm not made of money, lol.)

Windows on Wash 02-04-2012 01:00 PM

Ventilation is only for moisture control.

Shingle temperatures on a gable vs. ridge vented attic have nothing to do with shingle life.

If you have excess moisture, then you need to add ventilation and combine your efforts with air sealing as well.

While you are correct that the shingle manufacturer will void your warranty for any cause, don't go into this thinking you are going to get anywhere near 30 years out of that roof anyway and you won't be disappointed.

You can do everything that they vented fascia flow gives you by venting the fascia board and spacing out the gutter.

More intake air is always a good thing with a vented attic design so you are correct in that assessment and rationale.

philipluckey 02-04-2012 01:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dmc@RCR
Either of those products should work for you. We have been installing similar systems, fabricating our own, for years. Nice to see more choices by manufacturers.
Do you really get much snow in southern Tenn.?:eek:

Nice to see there are choices. Part of my fun is explaining the idea to the roofers I'm getting estimates from. ("You see, there's a thing that goes where the other thing would be!") And that's a reason for me to lean toward a prefab product, to reduce the learning curve on all involved.

Yes, occasional snow here in SE Tennessee -- it tends to be wetter snow and ice, compared to Colorado or New York (my other frames of reference). Typical snowfall is 1 - 3", maybe 1-2 times per winter. Though I also survived SuperStorm 1993, when we had 28 inches in one day - in March, no less! And seems like last year we had a weekend with 8-10" of snow... So it's all possible, I reckon, and I'm learning to plan for a wider array of possibilities (granted, it's 60 degrees all this week). :-)


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