DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Roofing/Siding (http://www.diychatroom.com/f9/)
-   -   Tile Roof - To offset or not to offset tiles (http://www.diychatroom.com/f9/tile-roof-offset-not-offset-tiles-88496/)

kowtow 12-03-2010 02:32 PM

Tile Roof - To offset or not to offset tiles
 
I'm in the process of buying a house built in 1992 which has a tile roof. I'm not sure the exact type of tile, but it's probably a lower-end flat tile that somewhat resembles a ceder shake in size and appearance.

I live in Washington state, which receives plenty of liquid sunshine throughout the year. During an inspection of the roof to get an estimate on some cracked and missing tiles, the inspector also noted that the tiles are not offset like they should be for proper installation. He states that by all the shingles being placed in a line as the picture below shows, they will allow water to work it's way to the underlayment. Once the underlayment has degraded over the years, it's going to allow moisture to penetrate the sheeting.

This makes perfect sense to me and looking at the pictures I would support this notion. The home inspector said that he has seen a large number of houses with tile roofs installed this way, but he also said the roofing experts observation makes sense.

My question is:
Is this tile roof on this house been installed incorrectly, because the tiles are not offset?

If so is there any remedy short of throwing all the shingles away and starting over from scratch?

What is the cost of a new tile roof, using a similar material to the one pictured? The house is 1600sq ft on both the main and second floors. I've also provided a picture of the house from the curb at the bottom of my post.

Any assistance you can provide would be much appreciated.

Thanks...




Here is a picture

http://www.kowtow.com/home/house03.jpg


http://www.kowtow.com/home/house01.jpg

Ed the Roofer 12-03-2010 03:40 PM

It is acceptable practice from the tile manufacturers product I have installed.

The overlapping tiles lock into the subsequent tile with a male channel being inserted into the female receiving channel.

Only if the exposure, or overlap of the preceeding course of tiles, or if the water channel is cracked would it be a major concern, in my opinion.

Ed

stuart45 12-04-2010 02:22 PM

2 Attachment(s)
They look to me like concrete interlocking tiles as shown below.
Attachment 27350
If so they need to be done as Ed has stated, otherwise they wouldn't work.
Attachment 27351
This is probably the most common method of roofing on new builds in the UK nowadays.

kowtow 12-07-2010 11:17 PM

Thanks Stuart! They look very very similar and your additional feedback would lead me to believe this roof installation was done exactly as it should have been.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:03 AM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved