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Old 09-13-2010, 12:59 AM   #1
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Sidewall shingles and flashing replacement.


Hello, I have been reading a little about how to replace the flashing pictured below. Info on retrofitting flashing is a little hard to come by, but from what I have been able to put together, I probably have to remove the bottom 2 or 3 rows of shingles, replace the flashing the then re-shingle. Is that right? Is this type of flashing typically nailed to the roof, or the sidewall, or both?

Also, the window is not flashed and I can actually see into the house between the sill and the roof. Any idea on how to seal or flash it properly? A similar window elsewhere on the house has a very thick bead of roofing caulk in the gap between the sill and the asphalt shingle. Is that kosher?

You guys here in the roofing forum have been incredibly helpful with my other questions. Thanks a lot for that.
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Old 09-13-2010, 09:47 AM   #2
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Sidewall shingles and flashing replacement.


I take it by the board you have nailed through the existing shingles you are planning on re-roofing this?

If so, your bottom row of shingles is too close to the roofdeck anyways. Carefully sawcut them 1 1/2" up, a sharp chisel on the ends where the saw won't reach. Remove the old flashing. You can slip a new wall flashing behind it with the help of a gentle flatbar.

As far as the window goes, caulk by itself is never a good fix for anything. One solution is to take a piece of wall flashing, cut all but 3/4" or so off the top leg and bend it forward to a 45 or better. This creates a one-way "wedge" under the window. Done properly once it slides under there it will grab the sill and will be difficult to remove. Caulk in front of that if you like and run a shingle over all the wall flashing.


Last edited by OldNBroken; 09-13-2010 at 09:50 AM.
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Old 09-13-2010, 12:53 PM   #3
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Sidewall shingles and flashing replacement.


Thanks for the reply. This is a much better plan than removing the cedar shingles. I am planning on re-roofing this little bump out. Two more quick things - when you say 'run a shingle over all the wall flashing', do you mean that when I am finished, the part of the wall flashing that extends on to the roof should reside between the actual roof shingles and a protective shingle that is on top of everything? For some reason I assumed that the flashing would remain on top. Secondly, how far should the flashing extend up the wall behind the sidewall shingles? Thanks again.
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Old 09-13-2010, 03:15 PM   #4
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Sidewall shingles and flashing replacement.


Standard flashings are 4"x4".

You will get a hundred opinions on here as to how to finish the wall flashings. I always let the job dictate which way to go. I try to leave the flashing exposed as long as it has a nice, snug fit over the last run of shingles. That does not always happen and it may not happen in your case.
You have two options:
1. Face-nail the flashing over the top of your last run and caulk the nail heads or...
2. Cut the salvage off the last run of shingles and nail them over the flashing, caulking the nail heads. Neither option is 100% right, nor 100% wrong.

Exposed nails anywhere on a shingle roof is one of those gray areas where we don't like to do it, but sometimes it's the only option.
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Old 09-13-2010, 04:38 PM   #5
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Sidewall shingles and flashing replacement.


Try to find an area where these is a loose shingle and lift if far enough to see if there is a Water Resistant Barrier (WRB, given the age of the property it will likely be a impregnated paper or felt material if a WRB is present) behind the shingles. If so, the new flashing should be installed behind it - you may have to pull some nails to do so.
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Old 09-13-2010, 05:35 PM   #6
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Sidewall shingles and flashing replacement.


It would be pretty easy to R&R that little triangle of siding, there is not much there and it terminates into the corbel. Go easy and number the pieces. About 15 min. of work there. Then you can flash and re-felt the wall and know it‘s right.
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Old 09-13-2010, 09:01 PM   #7
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15 min?....
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Old 09-13-2010, 09:09 PM   #8
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Better have plenty of replacements and fresh paint. Those shingles are a good 75 years old and guarantee half of them are going to split at the slightest disturbance.
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Old 09-13-2010, 11:42 PM   #9
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Sidewall shingles and flashing replacement.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kwikfishron View Post
It would be pretty easy to R&R that little triangle of siding, there is not much there and it terminates into the corbel. Go easy and number the pieces. About 15 min. of work there. Then you can flash and re-felt the wall and know its right.
I considered this but as OldNBroken correctly surmised, the 84 year old cedar shingles are brittle. My last line of defense if things really go off the rails on this project will be to remove all the old cedar singles in that triangle and replace them with new ones. Let's hope it doesn't come to that.
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Old 09-14-2010, 12:21 AM   #10
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Sidewall shingles and flashing replacement.


Quote:
Originally Posted by tomstruble View Post
15 min?....
That’s to remove the shingles.
I guess you guys are older than I thought
The 15 min. doesn’t start till after you make it to the top of the ladder.

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I considered this but as OldNBroken correctly surmised, the 84 year old cedar shingles are brittle. My last line of defense if things really go off the rails on this project will be to remove all the old cedar singles in that triangle and replace them with new ones. Let's hope it doesn't come to that.
Brittle or not your last line of defense would be my first.

You can punch the old nails through.

Worst case, a bundle of sidewalls is $40. You could replace at few shingles and have shims for life.

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Last edited by kwikfishron; 09-14-2010 at 12:50 AM.
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