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dave11 10-29-2011 10:00 PM

Should this roof edge be extended?
 
1 Attachment(s)
I've got an area of roof where two large gables come together, and all water is funneled into a small area of roof edge about 4 feet long. Basic diagram is attached.

The gutter overflows during a heavy rain, its only a 3 inch gutter, but has been there for 60 years since the house was built. It is about 22 feet above the driveway, and so its often blocked.

Biggest problem is that the roof was built with zero overhang in that area. The gutter rests flat against the brick wall of the house. When it overflows, water runs down to the bottom of the gutter, and streams down the bricks. Many years of this has damaged the mortar in that area.

I'm trying to decide now what would be the best long-term fix. Seems to me some sort of drip edge, or ideally at least a small overhang, should be put in place. Replacing the 3 inch gutter with a 4 inch gutter will also help, though again, it will likely be at least partly blocked much of the time, as it has been since it was built.

The roof is clay tile.

I'd really like to get the gutter away from the brick face. Any thoughts?

handy man88 10-29-2011 10:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dave11 (Post 759849)
I've got an area of roof where two large gables come together, and all water is funneled into a small area of roof edge about 4 feet long. Basic diagram is attached.

The gutter overflows during a heavy rain, its only a 3 inch gutter, but has been there for 60 years since the house was built. It is about 22 feet above the driveway, and so its often blocked.

Biggest problem is that the roof was built with zero overhang in that area. The gutter rests flat against the brick wall of the house. When it overflows, water runs down to the bottom of the gutter, and streams down the bricks. Many years of this has damaged the mortar in that area.

I'm trying to decide now what would be the best long-term fix. Seems to me some sort of drip edge, or ideally at least a small overhang, should be put in place. Replacing the 3 inch gutter with a 4 inch gutter will also help, though again, it will likely be at least partly blocked much of the time, as it has been since it was built.

The roof is clay tile.

I'd really like to get the gutter away from the brick face. Any thoughts?

How about a 5" gutter with 3"x4" down spout?

dave11 10-29-2011 10:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by handy man88 (Post 759865)
How about a 5" gutter with 3"x4" down spout?

It will still be blocked at least sometimes, and anytime that happens, water will stream right down the bricks. Since I'm going to have to spend a lot of money repairing the brick wall, I'd like not to have it get damaged again. It shouldn't have been built this way.

handy man88 10-29-2011 10:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dave11 (Post 759867)
It will still be blocked at least sometimes, and anytime that happens, water will stream right down the bricks. Since I'm going to have to spend a lot of money repairing the brick wall, I'd like not to have it get damaged again. It shouldn't have been built this way.

I agree it shouldn't have been built that way.

It's another case of form before function.

In any regard, a 5" gutter with 3"x4" downspouts will work better than what you have now. Worse case try two 3"x4" downspouts if one doesn't work.

You may want to consider wrapping the gutter around the corner for the 2nd downspout if you don't want to see two downspouts on the same side. That would lengthen your current length of 4'. See link below:

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=gutte...t:429,r:20,s:0

What's the reason for the blockage? Leaves?

dave11 10-30-2011 07:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by handy man88 (Post 759872)
I agree it shouldn't have been built that way.

It's another case of form before function.

In any regard, a 5" gutter with 3"x4" downspouts will work better than what you have now. Worse case try two 3"x4" downspouts if one doesn't work.

You may want to consider wrapping the gutter around the corner for the 2nd downspout if you don't want to see two downspouts on the same side. That would lengthen your current length of 4'. See link below:

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=gutte...t:429,r:20,s:0

What's the reason for the blockage? Leaves?

Can't wrap the gutter around the corner, because it would then be against the face of a gable, far below the roof line.

The gutter gets lots of leaves and pollen. Two downspouts can get clogged just as easily as one.

The issue isn't about handling the water. It's about getting the back of the gutter away from the face of the brick.

tinner666 10-30-2011 08:35 AM

A 12" to 18" overhang would be ideal in this situation. Find a carpenter that can make it look asthetically pleasing, and then a roofer to finish tying the roof in. Maybe a large crown molding instead of a straight fascia so you can put 6" 1/2 round gutter on it, with 4" downspouts.
It that doesn't go with the rest of the house, go with flat fascia, 6"K gutter and 3x4" downspout.

Probably looking at $1,500.00 -$2,000.00 for the complete job. You bricks will appreciate the difference.

Price is just a guesstimate. Don't hold anybody to it.

handy man88 10-30-2011 09:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dave11 (Post 759983)
Can't wrap the gutter around the corner, because it would then be against the face of a gable, far below the roof line.

The gutter gets lots of leaves and pollen. Two downspouts can get clogged just as easily as one.

The issue isn't about handling the water. It's about getting the back of the gutter away from the face of the brick.

Sure, if you want to spend the money to rebuild that area, then go for it.

I'm just trying to give you a lower priced option to consider without construction.

Downspouts will always be clogged, whether you extend the roof or not.

It's up to you as the homeowner to keep up with the maintenance in that area.

I'd recommend a downspout filter and a ladder that will reach up to that point if you don't want to outsource that work.

dave11 10-30-2011 12:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tinner666 (Post 760006)
A 12" to 18" overhang would be ideal in this situation. Find a carpenter that can make it look asthetically pleasing, and then a roofer to finish tying the roof in. Maybe a large crown molding instead of a straight fascia so you can put 6" 1/2 round gutter on it, with 4" downspouts.
It that doesn't go with the rest of the house, go with flat fascia, 6"K gutter and 3x4" downspout.

Probably looking at $1,500.00 -$2,000.00 for the complete job. You bricks will appreciate the difference.

Price is just a guesstimate. Don't hold anybody to it.

Creating an overhang seems like the best permanent solution, though most of the water streams down the valley, which would be at the very right edge of a simple overhang, and would likely just roll off the roof as it does now. So would the overhang need to be extended farther to the right than the roof edge of that side? If I just ran a gutter along that short return back to the wall, then I'm back where I started, with gutter hanging against the bricks.

It's the mortar directly under the valley that has been damaged.

handy man88 10-30-2011 03:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dave11 (Post 760115)
Creating an overhang seems like the best permanent solution, though most of the water streams down the valley, which would be at the very right edge of a simple overhang, and would likely just roll off the roof as it does now. So would the overhang need to be extended farther to the right than the roof edge of that side? If I just ran a gutter along that short return back to the wall, then I'm back where I started, with gutter hanging against the bricks.

It's the mortar directly under the valley that has been damaged.

It'll be interesting how the overhang works...especially since your location gets a lot of snow and that overhang can potentially be holding up all snow/ice from the valley instead of just blowing off like it probably does now.

tinner666 10-30-2011 04:55 PM

2 Attachment(s)
What you're describing sounds similar to this. This one only has a 9" overhang, an that's not a full gable to the right, but you get the idea.

The eave ends get frieze boards like this one. I'm searching pix, but can't find the correct one. I can assure you it's done quite often, usually in the building stage. It's why many 'L' additions to a smooth/flat gable end will extend 1' or more with an extended eave.


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