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-   -   Shingles losing aggregate (http://www.diychatroom.com/f9/shingles-losing-aggregate-128829/)

SPS-1 01-04-2012 07:55 PM

Shingles losing aggregate
 
My freind has an 11 year old asphalt shingle roof in Southern Ontario. The south facing portion is showing some age, but the north portion is far worse. A lot of the aggregate is gone and the corners of the shingles are starting to roll up. I would have thought the north portion would see the least degradation ( less sun ). The only difference on that section of roof is that there is a brick chimney near the top. Makes me wonder if the rainwater washing around the chimney causes faster erosion of the shingles below it. Anybody know why we would see increased wear on this portion of the roof ?

joecaption 01-04-2012 08:32 PM

Differant exposure to the sun, less trees blocking the sun, not as much soffet venting on that side.
Most roof wear out faster on one side, that's normal.
Those shingle needed replacing before now if there that bad.
I'd never use three tab shingles. There's now life time warrenty shingles avalible.

Rob1975 01-04-2012 08:38 PM

Sounds like poor ventilation, but it's hard to tell. Could be a number of factors. Without pics, I would say replace.

Missouri Bound 01-04-2012 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rob1975 (Post 812770)
Sounds like poor ventilation, but it's hard to tell. Could be a number of factors. Without pics, I would say replace.

Curling shingles is almost always a sign of excess humidity.

Rob1975 01-04-2012 09:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Missouri Bound (Post 812776)
Curling shingles is almost always a sign of excess humidity.

K, so what's your point? Excess humidity is caused by? And can be fixed by?

More or better ventilation.

It could also be a bad batch of shingles, bad installation, or stored incorrectly prior to installation.

I love guys that hunt threads to try and start something, instead of trying to help the OP.

Missouri Bound 01-04-2012 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rob1975 (Post 812787)
K, so what's your point? Excess humidity is caused by? And can be fixed by?

More or better ventilation.

It could also be a bad batch of shingles, bad installation, or stored incorrectly prior to installation.

I love guys that hunt threads to try and start something, instead of trying to help the OP.

What's my point...Well :censored: head I was adding to your post since I agreed with it. So don't you start anything. You think your attitude helps the OP?

epson 01-04-2012 09:33 PM

Curling on the edge of shingles is sign that the asphalt roof shingle must be replaced. Another possibility is the lack of back coating on the shingles. If this occurs, the cupping effect of the shingles may lead to more damage in the long-run. Often, shingles that are manufactured out of organic parts or wood tend to curl with excessive moisture. Replacing them with new shingles is often the solution to repair and protect your home from possible water damage. Asphalt shingles are the most inexpensive roofing material, and they also have to be replaced sooner. You have to replace an asphalt roof as little as 15 years, with the longest time being 30 years.

Rob1975 01-04-2012 10:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Missouri Bound (Post 812797)
What's my point...Well :censored: head I was adding to your post since I agreed with it. So don't you start anything. You think your attitude helps the OP?

Well then it's my bad :censored: head. :laughing:

Rob1975 01-04-2012 10:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by epson (Post 812827)
Curling on the edge of shingles is sign that the asphalt roof shingle must be replaced. Another possibility is the lack of back coating on the shingles. If this occurs, the cupping effect of the shingles may lead to more damage in the long-run. Often, shingles that are manufactured out of organic parts or wood tend to curl with excessive moisture. Replacing them with new shingles is often the solution to repair and protect your home from possible water damage. Asphalt shingles are the most inexpensive roofing material, and they also have to be replaced sooner. You have to replace an asphalt roof as little as 15 years, with the longest time being 30 years.

I read this some where before:

http://www.smartroofing.ca/when-repl...-shingles.html

epson 01-04-2012 10:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rob1975 (Post 812874)

yeah i just cut out the rest of it...

Windows on Wash 01-05-2012 07:46 AM

As said, could be any number of individual things or a combination of factors.

The fact that it is on the North side of the home would somewhat rule out the exposure argument.

Have you looking in the attic (if it has one)? Picture is worth a thousand words in this case and a more clear description of the construction, attic type, rooms below that side of the roof, and general details will help get more specific responses.

SPS-1 01-05-2012 08:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Missouri Bound (Post 812776)
Curling shingles is almost always a sign of excess humidity.


There is a bathroom pretty much directly under that portion of the roof. I would not have guessed that was the cause. Thanks for the help. The house will need a new roof shortly. Seems that some additional ventillation will be a good idea.

Windows on Wash 01-05-2012 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SPS-1 (Post 813091)
There is a bathroom pretty much directly under that portion of the roof. I would not have guessed that was the cause. Thanks for the help. The house will need a new roof shortly. Seems that some additional ventillation will be a good idea.

Ventilation is key, however, you should not rely on ventilation alone to fix what might be a bulk air loss and moisture migration issue.

Make sure the moisture stays in the bathroom and is controlled by venting through the roof deck or otherwise out of the home.

Missouri Bound 01-05-2012 03:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SPS-1 (Post 813091)
There is a bathroom pretty much directly under that portion of the roof. I would not have guessed that was the cause. Thanks for the help. The house will need a new roof shortly. Seems that some additional ventillation will be a good idea.

Get up there after running some hot water..enough to steam up the room. Then have someone turn on the exhaust fan when you are up there...Make sure the vent is doing what it should...venting to the outside.:sweatdrop:

Double-A 01-05-2012 08:25 PM

There is a particular shingle that failed over large geographic areas in North America. By any chance, do you know the manufacturer of the shingle on that roof?


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