Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Roofing/Siding

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-16-2013, 05:31 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: central Florida
Posts: 1,158
Blog Entries: 5
Share |
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


There's a gap in my gutters where a nail is loose. I didn't fix it cause it's a good place to collect rain water in a bucket for my plants.

Recently, after a heavy rain, I noticed in the bucket several tablespoons of the sandy stuff that's on shingles.

Why is it coming off and I suppose its not a good thing.

I think the roof was estimated to be 9.5 yrs old now. I don't see any curling or anything on the shingles, yet.

and, curious, why do shingles have that gritty stuff on them?

Startingover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2013, 05:39 PM   #2
Retired from the grind
 
gregzoll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Midwest - Central Illinois
Posts: 13,832
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


The more you find in the bucket, the sooner you need to be thinking about replacing your roof. It is normal to get some particles from the shingles. If you start seeing large amounts of the material in the gutters, the shingles cracking and curling, start saving for a roof job.

__________________
Ren: Now listen, Cadet. I've got a job for you. See this button? Ren: Don't touch it! It's the History Eraser button, you fool! Stimpy: So what'll happen? Ren: That's just it. We don't know. Maybe something bad, maybe something good. I guess we'll never know, 'cause you're going to guard it. You won't touch it, will you?
gregzoll is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to gregzoll For This Useful Post:
Startingover (12-16-2013)
Old 12-16-2013, 05:41 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 25,739
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


There called granules and they help absorbed some of the heat.
That gutter should have been fixed long ago, water running between the gutter and the fascia is going to rot it out.
Gutter nails are the last thing you want to use to hold a gutter up. Use hidden gutter hangers instead.
http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...lectedIndex=53
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to joecaption For This Useful Post:
Fix'n it (12-16-2013), Startingover (12-16-2013)
Old 12-16-2013, 06:25 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: central Florida
Posts: 1,158
Blog Entries: 5
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


Thank you.

Well, that's just bad news. I know I should replace the roof before the wood is rotted and has to be replaced also.........but it's not something I can do now.
Startingover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2013, 07:15 PM   #5
DIY staff
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 21,218
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


Granuals are constantly washing off,so what you are seeing is not necessarily a sentence of death---

As others have mentioned---as the roof ages they do shed more than a new roof---

Joe was concerned with the loose gutter---that is something that you should fix---a $3.00 hanger now or rotten wood facia later---

Many of the brackets use screws---those are the simplest to install---
__________________
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to oh'mike For This Useful Post:
Startingover (12-16-2013)
Old 12-16-2013, 08:07 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Hamilton, Ontario
Posts: 182
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


Usually when a gutter spike backs out its because it wasn't installed properly, its probably not in a rafter. To make it stay you'll need to either angle it a bit and put it in fresh wood or take a screw and drive it in beside the spike, angle it a bit and it will wedge the spike in place.
A bit of grit is normal, take some pictures of your roof if you want an assessment. At 10ish years old it could either be fine or due, depending. A lot of manufacturers had issues with their product in that timeframe.
PatChap is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to PatChap For This Useful Post:
Startingover (12-16-2013)
Old 12-16-2013, 08:56 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: central Florida
Posts: 1,158
Blog Entries: 5
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


these are old pictures of my roof. I probably need closer photos to see the shingles better.

the sandy stuff on shingles-dscn0522.jpg

the sandy stuff on shingles-dscn0537.jpg
Startingover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2013, 07:35 AM   #8
Exterior Construction
 
Windows on Wash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: VA, MD, DC
Posts: 5,604
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


Those pictures look fine but everyone else is correct in that as the roof ages and granules start to shed, that is one of the first indicators of roof age and product failure.

Light shedding of the granules is normal with weathering but as it speeds up, you should start to examine and possibly budget for a new roof.

Typically the shingles will not be sealed very well when the granules are dropping off more heavily and you will be more likely to get blow offs at that point.
Windows on Wash is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Windows on Wash For This Useful Post:
Startingover (12-17-2013)
Old 12-17-2013, 08:26 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 25,739
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


Those shingles where installed wrong around all those vents.
Should have looked like this.
http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...lectedIndex=26
Would not be that hard to come up with a far better looking way to add a screen to those large vents.
__________________
When posting in forums, letting us know your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions
joecaption is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to joecaption For This Useful Post:
Oso954 (12-17-2013)
Old 12-17-2013, 10:06 AM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: central Florida
Posts: 1,158
Blog Entries: 5
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


That's really interesting about the roof.

Friends and I talk about different things on house repair, but no one ever talks about roofing.

Joe, I will save your info, for when I get a new roof. I can only imagine how thrilled the roofers will be to have me telling them how I want the shingles installed around vents.

While I'm on the topic.............when I bought the house there was an unopened pack of shingles laying in the garage. I couldn't budge it so it took my daughter and I both to drag it to a corner. Do I need to keep it? When I get a new roof should I request a pack of shingles to have for a spare?
Startingover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2013, 10:53 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 199
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


Those are granules. They are coated over the asphalt on a shingle to protect it from UV rays and other factors which would degrade it. Once they wear away and the asphalt is exposed the shingle wear accelerates and replacement becomes necessary very soon.

Shingles loose lots of granules in the first few years because excessive amounts of the material are applied in the manufacturing process that don't adhere that well. Then the granule loss slows down for awhile, then later on in the aging process it starts to happen again. Granules in the gutter does not mean your roof is done. A solid roofer can get up there and look around and tell you about how many years you have left to build a new roof into the budget.

A sprinking is not as big of deal as if they're a couple inches deep in there. If you've never been up there before those granules could be from years ago, and the shingles might not have been shedding them that much recently.

Roofers have different rules of thumb about how they handle excess material. Many of them will plan to keep it unless you specifically request otherwise so I would say yes, if during the next roof over you decide you want extra shingles for repairs, there's no harm in asking. The bundle you have now could come in use if you have to replace damaged shingles or repair damaged sections of roof while you save for a re-roof. Takes the brainwork out of identifying what's up there and searching for a good match.

Last edited by eharri3; 12-17-2013 at 11:07 AM.
eharri3 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to eharri3 For This Useful Post:
oh'mike (12-18-2013), Startingover (12-17-2013)
Old 12-17-2013, 11:56 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,670
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


Off topic, but being you mentioned the gutter, the gutter problem can be corrected with a gutter screw and modify a down spout to collect your water for the plants.

http://shop.gutterworks.com/Gutter-screws-RS7-1.html
Fairview is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Fairview For This Useful Post:
Startingover (12-17-2013)
Old 12-17-2013, 03:03 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: central Florida
Posts: 1,158
Blog Entries: 5
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


eharri3, thanks, more good information.

fairview. This house has drywells, or had. I pulled the downspout out, so that what little rainwater I get, goes onto the grass and flowers. I might modify a spout when I get a new roof.
Startingover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-17-2013, 03:35 PM   #14
Member
 
Oso954's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Northern Calif.
Posts: 1,404
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


Quote:
Joe, I will save your info, for when I get a new roof. I can only imagine how thrilled the roofers will be to have me telling them how I want the shingles installed around vents.
Personally, I would call a roofer out to fix them on your current roof. The shingle that butted up against the vent from the down slope side is acting as a water dam. It will try to put the water under the shingles.
Improper shingling around vents causes water leaks over time.

While he is up there he can give you a general assessment of the roof.
Oso954 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Oso954 For This Useful Post:
Startingover (12-17-2013)
Old 12-17-2013, 04:20 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: central Florida
Posts: 1,158
Blog Entries: 5
Default

the sandy stuff on shingles


oso954, I'll do that before spring. At least I know who I'll call. It's always a worry to me trying to find someone. I'd feel better with wire guards on the vents also.

And, I will ask him if my vents are oversized. This is the truth. I can hear voices come out of my stove exhaust, when the neighbors are in their yard talking in a normal tone.

Even in the guest bathroom sounds are amplified from the other neighbor thru that exhaust fan. I've never had this happen before.

Startingover is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
making starters from Arch. Shingles diyroofer Roofing/Siding 13 09-19-2011 08:52 AM
Energy Star Qualified Asphalt roofing shingles? Scuba_Dave Roofing/Siding 50 09-28-2010 02:25 PM
Painting New Roof Shingles to match old ones? Lgarced Painting 0 03-25-2010 08:46 PM
Shingles on the roof Thurman Roofing/Siding 0 02-14-2010 03:40 PM
Difference between "heavier" shingles, and "wind resistant" shingles Inquiring Mind Roofing/Siding 4 02-03-2010 03:21 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.