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Old 10-13-2013, 01:48 PM   #16
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Roof sheathing


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To apeak. Otherwise, a flat spot will exist and the shingles will lie flat. Shingles lying flat leak.
So, meet the sheathing on opposites sides of the roof so both touch the very peak but the panels don't really touch each other?

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Old 10-13-2013, 04:12 PM   #17
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Roof sheathing


They can touch. They can miss each other by 1/2". Quit overthinking it.
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Old 10-13-2013, 05:13 PM   #18
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Roof sheathing


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They can touch. They can miss each other by 1/2". Quit overthinking it.
I'm trying not to. Im just trying to figure out if one sheet should extend up further so it laps the adjacent sheet is all or just bring them up until both sides of the bottom edges touch the peak.
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Old 10-13-2013, 06:29 PM   #19
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Roof sheathing


Whichever way you prefer to do it is fine. At the eave, I do prefer to overhang the fascia 1/2' to 3/4" for it's natural drip edge effect. Put drip edge on it and the gutter easily slips behind it to prevent water ever hitting the fascia.
The eave is much more important than the ridge.

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Old 10-13-2013, 09:37 PM   #20
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Roof sheathing


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Whichever way you prefer to do it is fine. At the eave, I do prefer to overhang the fascia 1/2' to 3/4" for it's natural drip edge effect. Put drip edge on it and the gutter easily slips behind it to prevent water ever hitting the fascia.
The eave is much more important than the ridge.
If you overhang the fascia board what do you use to cover the 1/2" to 3/4" of the underside of the sheathing?
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Old 10-13-2013, 09:52 PM   #21
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Roof sheathing


Paint, or it can be wrapped with aluminum trim, shaped like a 'U'. (squared, not rounded, of course). 3" x 'x' x 3". Install the sheathing, slip it on, jamb the fascia into place to hold it is the normal way of doing it.

Regular sheathing had always been 1x 6's or whatever. If the edge rotted off after 70 years or so, you could pop the board and flip it over for another 70 years or so. The tiny gap it left by flipping was never in a nail zone as a rule.
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Old 10-14-2013, 08:37 AM   #22
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Roof sheathing


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Paint, or it can be wrapped with aluminum trim, shaped like a 'U'. (squared, not rounded, of course). 3" x 'x' x 3". Install the sheathing, slip it on, jamb the fascia into place to hold it is the normal way of doing it.

Regular sheathing had always been 1x 6's or whatever. If the edge rotted off after 70 years or so, you could pop the board and flip it over for another 70 years or so. The tiny gap it left by flipping was never in a nail zone as a rule.
So, I take it you eliminate the standard drip edge flashing?
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Old 10-14-2013, 12:56 PM   #23
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Roof sheathing


Before drip edge was invented to cover roofer shortcomings, the wood extended over the fascia for a built-in fix. Doing both works wonders.
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Old 10-14-2013, 02:01 PM   #24
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Roof sheathing


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Before drip edge was invented to cover roofer shortcomings, the wood extended over the fascia for a built-in fix. Doing both works wonders.
What is your preference on using deck screws or nails for attaching roof sheathing?
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Old 10-14-2013, 03:11 PM   #25
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Roof sheathing


Nails are fine. I prefer to nail, but screws 'may' hold better.
Why 'may'? Because it's not likely to become an issue. Tornados will probably decimate your house no matter what you use. Screws won't add any value.

In hurricane country, you may get some benefit. If the rafters aren't strapped to the studs and top plate, if the framing isn't secured to the foundation, it probably won't matter there either.

Building a bunker would work in the middle of the tornado belt, but be counter-productive on the east coast where the storm tide tends to drown people in low areas.
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Old 10-14-2013, 03:42 PM   #26
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Roof sheathing


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Nails are fine. I prefer to nail, but screws 'may' hold better.
Why 'may'? Because it's not likely to become an issue. Tornados will probably decimate your house no matter what you use. Screws won't add any value.

In hurricane country, you may get some benefit. If the rafters aren't strapped to the studs and top plate, if the framing isn't secured to the foundation, it probably won't matter there either.

Building a bunker would work in the middle of the tornado belt, but be counter-productive on the east coast where the storm tide tends to drown people in low areas.
strapped to studs and top plate as in rafter/hurricane ties?
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Old 10-14-2013, 04:06 PM   #27
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Roof sheathing


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strapped to studs and top plate as in rafter/hurricane ties?
Yes. Just keep it simple. Maybe building Inspector could elaborate of this for you. I'm just a poor roofer that hasn't hasn't had to pay close attention to all these details for some years now.

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