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Davmac78 02-11-2011 07:23 PM

Roof/Gutter deicing tape
 
I would like to use 2 separate tapes, one for the gutters and a separate tape for the roof edge. I would plug these into a circuit capable of the load. Are 2 tapes ok or should I stay with the 1 tape method?

Slyfox 02-12-2011 06:09 AM

The heat cable should run through both the gutters and across the lower roof surface, one piece or two does not matter so long as they are properly installed.

1985gt 02-12-2011 02:25 PM

Depends on how long it needs to be. The brand we use can run up to 150 total feet, including D/S drops on one circuit. If you use two they need to be on two different circuits other wise it will trip breakers.

warmsmeallup 02-12-2011 06:55 PM

The correct way that will last is to make a double run in the gutter with a loop down the leader and serpentine on the roof dead ending on the end of the roof. Depending on the length, even with two separate cables, you may end up either needing two circuits or one 240v circuit. The 120v Self Regulating cable can run up to 175' (total) on a 30a circuit breaker and the 240v Self Regulating can run up to 375' (total) on a single circuit breaker of 30a. The breakers should also be GFPE (or GFEP) rated breakers. If you plug or connect to a GFCI breaker, you will get nuisance trips from the in-rush.

With double runs everywhere, you have one connection/plug point and enough heat to prevent an igloo that will happen over a single cable run. If you run two separate cables, you need to plug them in separately and, depending on the total length and the voltge cable you use, you may or may not need a single circuit to run them.

1985gt 02-12-2011 07:24 PM

Take a look at this.
http://www.tycothermal.com/usa/engli...m/default.aspx

and this

http://www.tycothermal.com/assets/Am...esign_1110.pdf

Should be all you need to decide how many cables you need.

1985gt 02-12-2011 07:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by warmsmeallup (Post 589877)
The correct way that will last is to make a double run in the gutter with a loop down the leader and serpentine on the roof dead ending on the end of the roof. Depending on the length, even with two separate cables, you may end up either needing two circuits or one 240v circuit. The 120v Self Regulating cable can run up to 175' (total) on a 30a circuit breaker and the 240v Self Regulating can run up to 375' (total) on a single circuit breaker of 30a. The breakers should also be GFPE (or GFEP) rated breakers. If you plug or connect to a GFCI breaker, you will get nuisance trips from the in-rush.

With double runs everywhere, you have one connection/plug point and enough heat to prevent an igloo that will happen over a single cable run. If you run two separate cables, you need to plug them in separately and, depending on the total length and the voltge cable you use, you may or may not need a single circuit to run them.


You can do it with one cable. You just cant go over your total lenght limit. That is determined on how many watts per foot of cable, circuit size and min temp. 175' would be MAX in the best of conditions. Last ones I did were 150 each circuit, and that was pushing it with an 6 watt per foot cable.

warmsmeallup 02-12-2011 09:09 PM

So, here's the math...Self Regulating wire in "the worst case scenerio, zero degrees" is 12 watts per linear foot. If you have a 120v circuit and 175 linear feet of cable (175' x 12 watts = 2100 watts), take 2100 watts and devide by 120 = 17.50 amps. So, 175' of SR cable at 12 wpsf will run comfortably on a 30 amp circuit considering the in-rush, no problem. We don't use the 6 watt stuff in the north east. It bridges over too easily.

Do the same calculation for 240v cable and you get 18.5 amps...375' no problem!

1985gt 02-12-2011 09:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by warmsmeallup (Post 589949)
So, here's the math...Self Regulating wire in "the worst case scenerio, zero degrees" is 12 watts per linear foot. If you have a 120v circuit and 175 linear feet of cable (175' x 12 watts = 2100 watts), take 2100 watts and devide by 120 = 17.50 amps. So, 175' of SR cable at 12 wpsf will run comfortably on a 30 amp circuit considering the in-rush, no problem. We don't use the 6 watt stuff in the north east. It bridges over too easily.

Do the same calculation for 240v cable and you get 18.5 amps...375' no problem!


Never have had problem with 6watt tape. Never have installed any for 220/240 hard enough to get them to put a regular outlet near by.

warmsmeallup 02-13-2011 08:49 AM

We don't install 'plug in' systems. I sell the materials for others to do that work. We install the efficient ones that use SR cable and connect to a junction box and use a temperature/moisture sensor that activate/deactivate themselves.

I stay away from the 6 watt cable. It's not that I think it's bad..it just doesn't work well enough in the northeast.

1985gt 02-13-2011 03:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by warmsmeallup (Post 590153)
We don't install 'plug in' systems. I sell the materials for others to do that work. We install the efficient ones that use SR cable and connect to a junction box and use a temperature/moisture sensor that activate/deactivate themselves.

I stay away from the 6 watt cable. It's not that I think it's bad..it just doesn't work well enough in the northeast.


The "plug in" systems we install are a self regulating cable also, you can hard wire it to a junction box. You can use a temp/moisture sensor also. Its just they have a handy gfci on the plug in it's self. Also you do not need a temp/moisture sensor with the systems, they just save you $$.

warmsmeallup 02-13-2011 05:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1985gt (Post 590479)
The "plug in" systems we install are a self regulating cable also, you can hard wire it to a junction box. You can use a temp/moisture sensor also. Its just they have a handy gfci on the plug in it's self. Also you do not need a temp/moisture sensor with the systems, they just save you $$.

I misunderstood you when you said that you use 6 watt cable. The MI cable is 6 watts (some of them are 5) but they are one wattage all the time. That's the cable I was refering to that we don't install. Yes, if you are using SR cable it is efficient in that it starts at 6 watts unless you plug it in when they're covered in snow.

1985gt 02-13-2011 05:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by warmsmeallup (Post 590546)
I misunderstood you when you said that you use 6 watt cable. The MI cable is 6 watts (some of them are 5) but they are one wattage all the time. That's the cable I was refering to that we don't install. Yes, if you are using SR cable it is efficient in that it starts at 6 watts unless you plug it in when they're covered in snow.


Rey Chem is the brand we use. Yes it starts at 6watts. I think its like 50 degs or so, then it goes up from there depending on load and what not.


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