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-   -   Replace 75 year old slate roof with a slate-look shingle product. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f9/replace-75-year-old-slate-roof-slate-look-shingle-product-118383/)

mstanleyg 09-26-2011 05:05 PM

Replace 75 year old slate roof with a slate-look shingle product.
 
It's time to replace our 75 year old slate roof - while the main section (with a fairly steep pitch) is fairly intact, the area over the garage (slight pitch) is in need of very frequent repair. Nails have rusted out, the slate moves causing recurring leaks. In addition, the copper valleys in the roof, as well as the flashing have all been tarred over repeatedly.

I am also considering rebuilding a 33 course chimney stack that also requires regular maintenance. Both jobs would be done in tandem. Pictures of the chimney and surrounding area on shown on another thread with my user id.

I would like to use shingles that emulate slate - look and deminsion- but do not wish to spend a ton of $$. Certain products have been recommended (slateline, certainteed grand mannor) but are fairly expensive.

I live on long Island near the ocean. Could anyone recommend good products for my needs? Also any advice in approaching this project would be well appreciated.

thanks
Mike

tinner666 09-26-2011 09:57 PM

If they still have a 'ring' to them, just pull and stack them on the roof, put down 30# or heavier felt and using 1-1/4" copper nails and 3-4" headlap, just reinstall them so they'll last 100 years or so.
Or just use shingles for a good 15-17 year roof.

Horseygirl 09-26-2011 11:03 PM

Just curious as to the other types of roofs that are in your community. Slate adds $$$ to your homes value. Shingles or some faux slate will cheapen it especially if the norm in your area. Many people think the opposite of you....what can I do to have an authentic slate roof and get rid of these shingles.

What Tinner666 said is so true...slate is a lifetime product. Nails and underlayment can be repaired and replaced. Whatever you decide, you could probably salvage the slate and sell it. 75 years of history gone. Pouff... At least up North you have qualified slaters... it's a specialized field. Here in Floria we have to import them from up North to have a job done properly. And, they only end up on very exclusive homes down here. OK, I'm done.:whistling2: Good luck with whatever you decide.

stuart45 09-27-2011 01:49 PM

Good advice from tinner666. I'm building an extension at home and using reclaimed Welsh slates older than your's. You might need to change the headlap on the garage if the pitch is not much.
Are you doing the work yourself?

Qballjr13 09-27-2011 02:06 PM

If you decide to not reuse your slate there are companies out there that will pay for your salvaged slate. I did this on a church that was built in the late 1800's and our company recouped a significant amout of money for selling the old slate. That slate was just over 100 years old at the time so I would think most of yours is still very usable.

mstanleyg 09-27-2011 03:48 PM

More info
 
Thank you folks for our quick replies and much appreciated advice!! I am not doing the work myself. My main reason for replacement rather than repair is the amount of work done during the past 30 years. All the flashing has been covered with tar, the area that pitches less needs to be repaired on a regular basis (last year I had copper flashing installed between the main roof and garage). Also the area around the chimney has been a constant problem spot with water penetrating the room next to it. Counter flashing is invisible, etc. Attic ventilation has been a problem as well - I have used attic fans for ventilation - but over time they burn out. I was thinking of installing ridge vents.

There are only two houses (both New England Cape Cods), one of which is mine, that have slate roofs - all the others are shingled and were built 15 years later. I hate to give up the slate but the expense to continue with it is up there - at least $15k to get it up to snuff.

Given that, I am open to any suggestions for moving forward.
Thanks
Mike

tinner666 09-27-2011 04:01 PM

Yeah, putting 'tar' on a roof sure does add to the expense. At least the seller got something good from it.
You have to replace all the flashing anyway. No increase or savings there. RV is possible with slate or shingles. Slate lasts longer.

Just shoot anybody you see approaching a roof with bucket of 'tar', whatever that is, in their hands. As I recall, those guys are 'In-Season' year 'round.

mstanleyg 09-27-2011 04:34 PM

Hi Frank - thanks for the response. Given the 'tar' situation - does it make more sense to replace the slate roof or re-install all the flashing and repair the slate? Not one bit of cooper shows anywhere.
thanks
Mike

Horseygirl 09-27-2011 04:41 PM

Quote:

I hate to give up the slate but the expense to continue with it is up there - at least $15k to get it up to snuff.
Have you gotten a quote for replacing with shingles yet? The ones that would emulate the slate look would be "up there" too. :eek: Your problem isn't with the slate but the quality of workmanship performed doing your "repairs". Too bad the slate suffers and becomes homeless.

mstanleyg 09-27-2011 05:02 PM

GAF SlateLine is ~4k more than architectual; Certainteed Grand Manor is $6500 more. I agree with you about the previous labor - unfortunately it's been done over the years and compounded the original problems.

BTW - I have been to areas where slate roofs are the predominate choice - a few of the homes have installed sythetics and look like they fit in.

I really hate to give up the slate with the comments I have received - but am concerned over the entire slate renovation work and cost.
thanks
Mike

tinner666 09-27-2011 05:04 PM

"Given the 'tar' situation - does it make more sense to replace the slate roof or re-install all the flashing and repair the slate? Not one bit of cooper shows anywhere."

As a rule, yes. Best bet is to gently remove them, felt as stated above, and reinstall with 4" headlap. Copper nails, etc. You might need to buy 2-3 squares extra. Have them terminate against a 1x4" nailer at the ridge and alternate flashing and slates across the ridge for a permanent closure.

tinner666 09-27-2011 06:12 PM

"There are only two houses (both New England Cape Cods), one of which is mine, that have slate roofs - all the others are shingled and were built 15 years later."

Just out of curiousity, and slightly OT, how do those 60 year old shingles look today?

tinner666 09-27-2011 09:11 PM

You talked about all the ongoing repairs. For the record and future reference, slate repairs are made by pulling any remnants of a broken slate and it's nails out. Then, a replacement slate has a hole punched in it's center, from the rear, near the top of it's keyway. Then, it's slid into place, a copper nail is tapped in through the hole, and 'set' with a 3/32" nailset to a proper depht, ( The nails hold slate in place in a recess created by the punch and ARE NOT nailed tightly!They are hung in place, as opposed to being tightly nailed in place.), and a copper or black aluminum bib at least 5"w x 7" long, MINIMUM, is slid up the keyway covering the nail and continueing up until a 3'4" headlap is achieved. The repair is as permanent as any other slate in the roof. No 'tar' involved.


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