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-   -   Reparing Large Hole In Standing Seam Metal Roof (http://www.diychatroom.com/f9/reparing-large-hole-standing-seam-metal-roof-153920/)

xquercus 08-16-2012 06:38 PM

Reparing Large Hole In Standing Seam Metal Roof
 
I'm considering purchasing a house with a standing seam metal roof. If I were to purchase the house, one of the things I would do is remove the existing 8" metal chimney and install a new 6" chimney in a different location -- for a wood stove. At this point, I don't know the details of the metal roof or even the brand. Ideally, I would be able to find the brand and even the installer to replace the panel which is perforated by the current 8" chimney. Replacing a panel like this would not be a DIY project for me. If, however, this roof product is no longer made, is there an acceptable way to 'patch' a rather large round hole in a metal roof panel? This style of roof has flat panels -- except for the seams or course. Thoughts?

tinner666 08-16-2012 07:46 PM

Asked and answered just the other day. http://www.diychatroom.com/f9/metal-roofing-repair-153234/

xquercus 08-16-2012 08:17 PM

Thanks, tinner. I saw your response in that thread earlier when I was searching the archives. I also mis-read it and thought you were discussing replacing an entire panel.

Reading your post, it sounds like the 'patch' I'm looking for is actually constructing a partial panel, cutting out the section in need of replacement, and putting in the new partial panel in with the correct seems.

Thank you very much. I'm not sure who manufactured the original roof so its likely some sort of custom fabrication like this would have to be done. This definitely isn't a DIY project for me so I'll have to leave the roofing part to a pro. The roof is quite amazing. It was apparently installed in 1988 but it looks like it could have been installed last year. I'm not sure if it is made of steel with an incredibly rust resistant coating or what. It just looks to be in fantastic condition.

Thanks again!

roofnron 08-16-2012 09:41 PM

Tinner's advise is dead on if you have that type of metal roof posted in his links. If you have a Kynar (or similar-type) painted metal roof the procedure would be very different. Maybe you could post a pic of the roof, hopefully of area in question.

tinner666 08-17-2012 06:10 PM

2 Attachment(s)
A little different for steel. Here's a flat-lock seam done with 24ga. steel which seems to be the norm lately. Cut and make your folds. Stay 1" or more from the seam. When you're ready to hook them together, squeeze some gutter sealer into the two folds. This will seal the cut ends against rust. Put just a little on the vertical sides where it will be hidden and about 1" or so up from the finished seam.
Slide together, use mallet t close the seams tightly.
Done properly, no sealer or caulk will show.

roofnron 08-18-2012 09:00 AM

Most roofs today are done in long runs from eave to ridge. A typical customer that I deal with would have a heart attack on me if I left what looked like a patch in the middle of a roof plane, where there are no other horizontal seams in the field.

This may not be the case with xquerces, but for anyone else that may be searching.

I would consider leaving the existing pipe in place, assuming it is not leaking and looks good. Disconnect it from the attic. You could even cut the pipe close to the decking, cap it, and seal around it to the decking to block any unwanted air. Reason are:

Field lock 24 or 26 gauge are really tough to unlock and deal with. There is too much chance of dinging or denting the panels and scratching the paint working on it.
Unless you have metal left over from the original job, the paint color will never match, again helping to notice the obvious patch.
Leak potential. You can probably count on one hand roofers in each state as qualified or as passionate about his work as tinner. A normal roofer is going up there pop-riveting a patch over the hole, then caulking around it to keep it from leaking.

xquercus 08-18-2012 11:44 AM

Even though I've decided this isn't a DIY project for me, I appreciate everyone's input. If this is something I move forward with, I'll be sure to post my results.

tinner666 08-18-2012 09:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by roofnron (Post 991437)
You can probably count on one hand roofers in each state as qualified or as passionate about his work as tinner.

What did I ever do to you? Huh? Why swell my head up so I can't lift it anymore and have to quit roofing????:eek: :laughing:

Quote:

Originally Posted by roofnron (Post 991437)
A normal roofer is going up there pop-riveting a patch over the hole, then caulking around it to keep it from leaking.

I can't help myself..... "Normal"?????????????:eek: :laughing:

BTW, thanks for the vote of confidence.:)


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