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Old 03-23-2013, 09:29 AM   #1
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Re-tarring Roof In Early Spring


Hi,
There is a small section at the front of my house that's about 250 sqft. This section has a tar roof that's starting to get older. I've had a couple of small leaks that I repaired about 6 months ago but I'm looking to put a new layer of tar on just to prevent it from getting worse.

I've done a little research/went to lowes and bought a product called blackjack #57 Premium Rubberized Fibered Coating. This product appears to be exactly what I'm looking for except once I got home I realized that it says that it should be applied in weather warmer than 70 degrees. It's currently 38 degrees and I don't expect it to get up to 70 in at least a couple of months.

I was looking to do this project today however the weather is a concerns. I figure there has to be roofers that apply tar coatings during winter and was looking to see if this would be a problem, or if there's any tips I could get that may help to do this without having to wait a few months.

Thanks,
Paul

PS. I've attached a picture to this post that contains the directions that I mentioned in this post.
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Re-tarring Roof In Early Spring-black-jack-570-temp.jpg  

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Old 03-23-2013, 10:37 AM   #2
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Re-tarring Roof In Early Spring


You are going about this all wrong.

If you had properly repaired the leaks you had 6 months ago they would not be leaking now. To do a decent repair now, buy a can of winter grade flashing cement at a roofing supply, a roll of 6 inch asphalt saturated cotton fabric and a can of Henry spray asphalt primer. Primer is ASTM D-41. If they dont have the primer in spray form like Henry makes, (Great Idea, by the way) Buy a pint of mineral spirits and mix up a cutback yourself by combining MS and a trowel of roof cement. Wire brush the area to be patched. apply the primer to the area with a china bristle brush or spray if you got the Henry stuff. When dry trowel on the mastic. Embed asphalt saturated fabric in mastic and smooth out all wrinkles. Extend past hole 3 inches. Trowel on mastic again. Embed second ply, extending past first ply 3 inches. Top coat with mastic.

Dont let them sell you fiberglass fabric, you want asphalt saturated cotton fabric I think its ASTM D-173 if memory serves.

If your roof is generally shot and alligatoring, it may be a candidate for a recover with a torch applied, two ply SBS Modified Bitumen roof.

Applying a can of liquid goop will do no good, and it might make recover impossible.

Post pictures of the roof, not the can of goop you should not use.

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Last edited by jagans; 03-23-2013 at 10:43 AM.
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Old 03-23-2013, 04:27 PM   #3
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Re-tarring Roof In Early Spring


"You are going about this all wrong. If you had properly repaired the leaks you had 6 months ago they would not be leaking now."

Hi Jagans. I appreciate your reply however, at no point did I say in my post that the roof is still leaking. My patch was good and there has been no leaks since.

The roof it getting older and probably should be replaced in a few years. It's currently not in my budget to do a tear-off and the roof in my opinion isn't bad enough to do a tear off or replacement yet. I'm just looking to extend the life of the roof. I've done some research and found that putting a layer of Fibered Asphalt on top should give me a few additional years.

Anyway, I wasn't looking for advice to see if I was doing this correctly, but more looking to see if anyone has experience or tips on using Fibered Asphalt Coatings in cold weather. Any tips? I'm thinking at this point I just may need to wait the few months until it get's warmer.

Paul
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Old 03-23-2013, 06:36 PM   #4
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Re-tarring Roof In Early Spring


Sorry Paul, I didnt know you used the method I described to affect repairs. The real function of most coatings are to protect the roof membrane from UV degradation. One of the most used, effective coatings is an asphalt cutback aluminum coating. As long as you apply this when the membrane is in good condition, that is, not blistered, ridged or alligatored, you can apply it about every 7 years. It is best to roll it on in two coats. You have to continually mix it because the aluminum flake sinks. If the roof is suffering from the aforementioned problems its not going to help and will prevent you from making repairs. I would wait until you have at least 50 degrees before applying any type of coating.
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