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Old 11-14-2007, 08:22 AM   #1
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Please explain the pros and cons to gutters.


We bought a townhome this summer and there are no gutters / eavestroughing on it. It's a 2-storey townhome, so about 80% of the roofline is 2-storeys up. The other 20% is the front of the recessed garage, and also the main entrance/porch roof.

The path to our main (side) entrance is almost directly under the roofline.

Anyhow, what are the pros and cons to eavestroughing? We live in an area that gets a lot of snow as well as a lot of freezing rain and freeze/thaw cycles. (Ottawa valley, eastern Ontario). I recall that in the manual for the home (if it were only that simple!) that the previous owner left us, it said that adding gutters can and usually does void the shingle warranty due to the high likelihood of ice/snow build up destroying the shingles and the flashing(?) itself.

Any idea what the rough cost to getting these installed would be?

Thank you.

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Old 11-14-2007, 12:42 PM   #2
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Please explain the pros and cons to gutters.


[quote=curls00;73802]

I recall that in the manual for the home (if it were only that simple!) that the previous owner left us, it said that adding gutters can and usually does void the shingle warranty due to the high likelihood of ice/snow build up destroying the shingles and the flashing(?) itself.

quote]

I have not heard that gutter installations could void a shingle manufacturers warranty. In extreme snow and ice climates, ice damming can be a problem, but that is more related to the lack of proper R-Value insulation in the attic, improper balanced intake and exhaust ventilation, and the non-inclusion of an Ice and Water Shield protective underlayment under the bottom courses of installed shingles, usually by code, to a point of at least 24" past the heated interior wall.

But, maybe things are different in Canada.

This is a copy/paste from a home inspectors forum I participate in, which may shed some light on the topic.

Ed

Edited Quote:
"In residential application there is no requirement that I know of.

I rant about gutter installation all the time, however the downspout capacity is not the root of the problem in many cases.

1200 sf roof needs one downspout, but 2 feet of gutter can not handle 1200 sf. Also every 90 degree fitting slows water flow and results in over/back flow. This is what I see all the time.
When there is water in the basement/crawlspace, I always point attention towards the roof (then downspout diversion and site grading).

Gutters are the primary cause of structural damage around here due to expansive soils."

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