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-   -   Patio & Carport Advice (http://www.diychatroom.com/f9/patio-carport-advice-4206/)

wdj03 10-04-2006 04:49 PM

Patio & Carport Advice
 
I have a 12' x 16' (192sqft) patio and a 26' x 12' (312sqft) carport attached to my house. Part of both roofs are leaking which has resulted in some water damage to the joists & beams holding the patio up. We're selling the house, so obviously the roofs and damaged structure has to be fixed.

I've had some general contractors estimate the entire job, (structural, roofing, and painting) and their prices seem pretty high. One bid is fairly reasonable, but still high enough to make me think about DIY'ing some parts of the project.

The estimates I received are based on Torch-down roofing, and I'm curious as to whether that's the best option and if so, why. Based on a ballpark figure that I got from a roofing contractor, Torch-down seems very expensive. He said $1500-$2000...

Does this sound reasonable, or should I try a few companies?

I'm not interested in trying to DIY a Torch-down, but I am curious about some of the peel & stick products out there. Are they satisfactory for outdoor covered patio areas?

Also, what would be the reccomended slope on these areas? Right now, the patio has too much slope and the carport is flat. I have a way to adjust each of them, but need to know how much slope is reccomended.

AaronB 10-04-2006 08:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wdj03 (Post 19991)
I have a 12' x 16' (192sqft) patio and a 26' x 12' (312sqft) carport attached to my house. Part of both roofs are leaking which has resulted in some water damage to the joists & beams holding the patio up. We're selling the house, so obviously the roofs and damaged structure has to be fixed.

I've had some general contractors estimate the entire job, (structural, roofing, and painting) and their prices seem pretty high. One bid is fairly reasonable, but still high enough to make me think about DIY'ing some parts of the project.

What do you base your opinions on? Have you gitten other work like this done and know the approximate costs involved? Or is it more than you want to spend?

AaronB 10-04-2006 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wdj03 (Post 19991)
The estimates I received are based on Torch-down roofing, and I'm curious as to whether that's the best option and if so, why. Based on a ballpark figure that I got from a roofing contractor, Torch-down seems very expensive. He said $1500-$2000...

Again....see above.

Although, when I see a ballpark instead of a firm number on a specific scope of work, I wonder why.

AaronB 10-04-2006 08:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wdj03 (Post 19991)
I'm not interested in trying to DIY a Torch-down, but I am curious about some of the peel & stick products out there. Are they satisfactory for outdoor covered patio areas?

Not if you want these areas to be leak-free. You need 1/2" per foot minimum slope for self adhered membranes, I believe. I have never trusted anything without a heat bonded seam or a seam tape. I do not trust them for my customers, and now we are starting to hear a bunch of roof failure horror stories.

wdj03 10-05-2006 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AaronB (Post 20006)
What do you base your opinions on? Have you gitten other work like this done and know the approximate costs involved? Or is it more than you want to spend?

I did an extensive remodel of my house about 5 years ago, I work in industrial engineering/construction, and I have close relatives that are realtors, home inspectors, landlords, and home builders.

I do know the approximate costs for structural and painting. I don't know the approximate costs or options for roofing. That's why I'm here.

If the roofing portion is a large component of the price, then I don't stand to save much by doing the structural work myself and will probably pay for the whole job. If the roofing portion is smaller, then I do stand to save myself a chunk of money by doing the structural myself.

wdj03 10-05-2006 09:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AaronB (Post 20007)
Again....see above.

Although, when I see a ballpark instead of a firm number on a specific scope of work, I wonder why.

It was purely a phone conversation, and I wouldn't expect anyone to give me a firm price without seeing the job.

Understand - I'm not at the point of trying to compare bids or select a contractor, I'm just trying to get a rough idea of what the roofing portion of the job costs so I can decide what I want to pay for and what I want to DIY..

I don't need to know what the exact price for the roofing will be right now, I just need to know a rough idea of how this stuff is priced.

If someone asked what tile costs, I'd say about $3-$4 per foot.

If someone asked about carpet, I'd say $10/yard...

Is adequate outdoor patio roofing $100 per square or $500 per square?

wdj03 10-05-2006 09:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AaronB (Post 20008)
Not if you want these areas to be leak-free. You need 1/2" per foot minimum slope for self adhered membranes, I believe. I have never trusted anything without a heat bonded seam or a seam tape. I do not trust them for my customers, and now we are starting to hear a bunch of roof failure horror stories.

My local HomeD hadn't even heard of the stuff anyway...

1/2" per foot makes sense.. Right now my patio has excessive slope of about 1" or more per 1' and as mentioned, the carport is flat..

Also, I talked to my contractor and he said that they weren't planning on torch-down. They were going to do something called cold mop.. Any thoughts on that for a warm climate with no snow?

AaronB 10-06-2006 04:59 PM

Bad if youre going to be walking on it.

Find a polyurea applicator in your area. Asphaltics are soft in the sunshine..bad for foot traffic. Mod bits are asphaltic, cold mop, too (mostly)

I would like to see something anti-skid, waterproof, durable, puntcure resistant, long-lasting, visually appealing. Polyureas can do all this for you. I would go direct-to-deck if the deck is plywood and youre not looking for insulation value within the roof assembly.


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