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Old 03-30-2011, 12:07 PM   #1
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Open Eaves Soffit and new blown insulation


Hello, first post, i've been doing research here but never posted.

I recently bought a home built in 1910 in Georgia and I am trying to make some retro fits to keep the cooling bills down. The home has open eaves, Ridgevents on the roof, two large gable vents in the attic, newly blown attic insulation, and no soffit or under eaves vents.

Insulation:


Open Eaves:



My proposal:

I'd like to cut in vents under the eaves and seal off the gables to allow the stack effect to take place.

For Example:


My issue:

Since the home has newly blown attic insulation I do not want to compress it. However i know it is important to create a pathway for the air to enter the attic unobstructed (baffles or vent chutes).

Solution:

Can I simple push the insulation out of the way from the outside once I cut the under eaves vent slot and avoid installing baffles in the attic?

I understand that installing baffles is the correct way to do things, but considering that I would be compressing a good portion of my attic insulation I'm wondering if the community sees this as a good middle ground.


Last edited by mpierce9; 03-30-2011 at 12:13 PM.
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Old 03-30-2011, 06:16 PM   #2
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Open Eaves Soffit and new blown insulation


Those gable vents are right at the top edge of the insulation, so maybe you don't need to add any soffit vents.

What is your R-value?

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Old 03-30-2011, 06:23 PM   #3
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Open Eaves Soffit and new blown insulation


The vent in the image is one I cut under the eaves. Its what i would like to repeat. I brushed the insulation away from the outside. The insulation R value is R38. I would like to close the gable and add soffits due to my understanding that ridge vents and gable vents don't work well together.

Last edited by mpierce9; 03-30-2011 at 06:25 PM.
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Old 03-30-2011, 06:34 PM   #4
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Open Eaves Soffit and new blown insulation


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Originally Posted by mpierce9 View Post
The vent in the image is one I cut under the eaves. Its what i would like to repeat. I brushed the insulation away from the outside. The insulation R value is R38. I would like to close the gable and add soffits due to my understanding that ridge vents and gable vents don't work well together.
OK, well put some more vents in.

I think you need to determine the exhaust of your ridge vent and calculate the intake needed to make it balanced. Someone who responds often here has some website that provides that info.

What part of the US are you located?
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Old 03-30-2011, 06:40 PM   #5
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Open Eaves Soffit and new blown insulation


Thank you for the reply, and I do plan on adding more vents. I live in Atlanta GA as mentioned. My initial question still stands though, do I need to add baffles for the vents given my current situation, or can I just push the insulation to the side once I cut the vent?
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Old 03-30-2011, 06:44 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpierce9 View Post
Thank you for the reply, and I do plan on adding more vents. I live in Atlanta GA as mentioned. My initial question still stands though, do I need to add baffles for the vents given my current situation, or can I just push the insulation to the side once I cut the vent?
I would only add baffles if you need to keep the insulation pushed back to prevent the obstruction of air flow. If there's a chance of blockage, I would add the baffles.

There was someone who posted here who had the same issue as you, but instead of cutting out a rectangular vent, he cut out circular holes and ran pvc pipes, I think.

This vent theory does work in theory, albeit very slowly.

Consider adding vents, but closing off both the gable and ridge vents, and then add a power vent so you have active, vice passive, venting.

Last edited by handy man88; 03-30-2011 at 06:46 PM.
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Old 03-31-2011, 09:11 AM   #7
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Open Eaves Soffit and new blown insulation


You should add some type of baffle to keep the insulation from falling and blocking the soffit vents. You can get wind blowing into the soffits that might disturb the insulation.

More venting is better. Add the soffit vents and keep both the ridge and gable vents for passive ventilation, and possibly add a power roof vent if the heat is too much. You can find more attic ventilation info here; http://www.roofingcontractorreview.c...ntilation.html
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Old 04-01-2011, 10:41 AM   #8
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So the suggestion is to risk compressing the attic insulation in order to add baffles into the eaves vents and to leave the gable vents, ridge vents, new cut eaves vents all open and possible add a power fan?
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Old 04-01-2011, 02:48 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mpierce9 View Post
So the suggestion is to risk compressing the attic insulation in order to add baffles into the eaves vents and to leave the gable vents, ridge vents, new cut eaves vents all open and possible add a power fan?
Intake is very important.
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Old 05-13-2011, 02:11 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by mpierce9 View Post
So the suggestion is to risk compressing the attic insulation in order to add baffles into the eaves vents and to leave the gable vents, ridge vents, new cut eaves vents all open and possible add a power fan?
I can't speak to the question regarding the risk of compressing your insulation, but please ignore the advice that someone gave about combining different types of exhaust vents for the same attic space.

Because of the so-called stack effect (i.e., hot air is less dense and travels up in an attic), you need to establish a single "low point" for intake and a single "high point" for exhaust. By single, I mean that all your intake vents should be at one elevation (at the soffits or undereaves) and all your exhaust vents should be at one elevation (say, a ridge vent at the top only, with no additional exhaust vents below the ridge). If you use turbine vents, for example, you want to place them all at the same distance from the ridge (not one in the middle of the slope, and another at the top).

Otherwise, you are likely to encounter a situation where the air "short circuits". Air might come in through the gable vent (which is supposed to be exhaust) and out the ridge vent. That reduces the effectiveness of the "washing" effect that you want, where air comes in from the soffits and up to the ridge vent.

Don't take it from me, though. The link below is from Lomanco, a reputable manufacturer of venting products. Read the Do's and Don'ts section.

http://www.lomanco.com/VentilationGuide/ventguide.html
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Old 05-14-2011, 08:51 AM   #11
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Open Eaves Soffit and new blown insulation


You have the right idea, just buy a couple bags of loose fill insulation to repair your squashed insulation as you leave the attic upon finishing your task

Dale Chomechko
DC Roofing Inc

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