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Old 05-23-2013, 07:28 PM   #16
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New home roofing rippling/deflection issue


The gable vents are interfering with the air flow and should be blocked off.

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Old 05-23-2013, 07:51 PM   #17
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New home roofing rippling/deflection issue


I do not know what your building code is, so any comments as to code requirements would be based upon my knowledge of the International Residential Code (IRC), which is commonly used as the basis for local codes. you would have to verify your code requirements with the building department.

typically when rafters connect to either a ridge board, or in your case a ridge beam there is to be an uplift connection. This is a code requirement under the IRC. This can be accomplished by one of two standard methods.

1. use wooden members that are attached to the sides of opposing rafters. these are normally found in the upper 1/3 of rafters length and are commonly referred to as collar ties.
2. use of a metal tie strap applied over the roof sheathing that connect opposing rafters together. When the shingles on it may be difficult to determine if they were installed or not.

This connection is used to prevent the rafters from pulling away from the ridge board or beam, which seems to be something you have described. Of course they could have been off making their plumb cuts.

it sounds like the ridge beam was used because of the dormers, unequal roof pitches and ceiling configuration. When dormers are installed (depending on their width) you loose opposing rafters and need a beam to balance the roof loads or there will be issues with the ridge sagging.

I would recommend based upon what you've shown and commented on that you seek the services of a professional engineer that specializes in wood frame construction and have them evaluate your existing construction. They can determine if you have any code deficiencies (based upon your code requirements) and the best course of action to take to fix/repair them. I know if I were in your situation I'd go this course.

I wish I had better news, or could provide a another solution, but I think this would be the prudent thing to do.

Good luck and keep us posted. Maybe other members will have other suggestions.
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Old 05-23-2013, 08:41 PM   #18
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New home roofing rippling/deflection issue


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The gable vents are interfering with the air flow and should be blocked off.
JS: Can you please explain how they interfere with the air flow? Thanks
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Old 05-23-2013, 09:14 PM   #19
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New home roofing rippling/deflection issue


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Originally Posted by GBrackins View Post
I do not know what your building code is, so any comments as to code requirements would be based upon my knowledge of the International Residential Code (IRC), which is commonly used as the basis for local codes. you would have to verify your code requirements with the building department.

typically when rafters connect to either a ridge board, or in your case a ridge beam there is to be an uplift connection. This is a code requirement under the IRC. This can be accomplished by one of two standard methods.

1. use wooden members that are attached to the sides of opposing rafters. these are normally found in the upper 1/3 of rafters length and are commonly referred to as collar ties.
2. use of a metal tie strap applied over the roof sheathing that connect opposing rafters together. When the shingles on it may be difficult to determine if they were installed or not.

This connection is used to prevent the rafters from pulling away from the ridge board or beam, which seems to be something you have described. Of course they could have been off making their plumb cuts.

it sounds like the ridge beam was used because of the dormers, unequal roof pitches and ceiling configuration. When dormers are installed (depending on their width) you loose opposing rafters and need a beam to balance the roof loads or there will be issues with the ridge sagging.

I would recommend based upon what you've shown and commented on that you seek the services of a professional engineer that specializes in wood frame construction and have them evaluate your existing construction. They can determine if you have any code deficiencies (based upon your code requirements) and the best course of action to take to fix/repair them. I know if I were in your situation I'd go this course.

I wish I had better news, or could provide a another solution, but I think this would be the prudent thing to do.

Good luck and keep us posted. Maybe other members will have other suggestions.
Thank You for your help: Neither application 1 or 2 was used ,I was living on site as the home was built so I was able to see most of the build take place and I took pictures throughout the build. The house was inspected, but to what extent on framing I am not sure.

One more question if you care to answer. I mentioned to the builder on a few occasions that the roof is still rippling even after he wrote the memo which said it would not. I have not forced the issue and hoped he would become pro-active and look into it. As I mentioned in my initial post he feels the house is completed and since he does not live here out of sight out of mind applies.
Do you feel that the framing issues 1 and 2 that you listed are the reasons for the rippling or it is just not the correct way to frame? If 1 and 2 are the reasons and code in my area says they do not have to be done, am I stuck with the rippling.
Should I be the one that hires the expert (and the one to pay him/her) or should I tell the builder, you need to hire a non-biased expert?
Even if an expert would say it is only aesthetical not structural I still believe I will lose money down the road when I sell the home. I have never seen a home with this problem before including those built by my builder that I went and looked at. Something must be wrong.
Just looking for suggestions on how to approach this issue that gives me the best shot at getting the problem resolved.
Thanks again.
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Old 05-23-2013, 10:01 PM   #20
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New home roofing rippling/deflection issue


your not the first person to use that has had problems with that solarboard- Norbord. It looks like it has delmanated. That is why I hate being the first to try something new in construction. Let other people try it out and see if it works or not. for me 5/8th five ply CDX is all i would use for roof sheathing. if you want to find out if it has delamenated go in to your attic and push against the sheathing if it feels squishy you have sheathing that the glues have failed.
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Old 05-23-2013, 11:44 PM   #21
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New home roofing rippling/deflection issue


if this connection does not hold it could be the cause of your rafter ends not being flush against the ridge. movement of the rafters could cause a ripple effect in my opinion, however my opinion does not really count thus the reason for recommending a professional engineer from your area.

I myself would feel a lot better having an engineer of my choosing over the builders. Professional engineers are bound by a code of ethics so that part does not concern me, their knowledge and experience in evaluating structures does. As no two builders are equal, neither are engineers.

You could discuss this with the builder but from comments it seems he does not believe it is caused by anything he did so I'm not sure what the motivation would be on his part. If the engineer finds deficiencies then I'd tell the builder he needs to pay for the engineer and fix his mistakes. In my state builders are licensed by the state and are subject to answer for consumer complaints. I do not know about your state.

Tough situation to be in. I do feel for you.

You could call and get estimates for the engineer's service, chances are they would have to come to to site to determine an estimate. If it were my home I wouldn't wait around, but them I'm usually a wimp when it comes to the money I spend on things.

Good luck.
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Last edited by GBrackins; 05-23-2013 at 11:46 PM.
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Old 05-24-2013, 09:37 AM   #22
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New home roofing rippling/deflection issue


Prior to about 1920 full 1 inch thick dimensional lumber was generally used for roof sheathing. From 1920 till about 1952, 3/4 inch Tongue and groove fir was used generally with 2 x 8 support at 16 inches on center After this 3/4 inch plywood was used. Then we went to trusses at 24 inches on center with minimum 1/2 inch CDX. Now one poster here says that he regularly uses 3/8 plywood supported at 24 inches on center.

Whats next, reinforced toilet paper supported at 32 inches on center by straws?

And we wonder why the roofs are buckling and look like crap. What a freakin joke!

As Gary said in a previous post, just because you can do it, does not mean you should do it. People have a very serious misconception about codes. They think they are OK with codes. Codes are the absolute minimum you can get away with, and have nothing to do with aesthetics.

3/8 inch might support your weight, but it is probably going to buckle, and its ability to retain nails is crap.

Local agencies that blindly follow the IBC are just plain ignorant.

This poor poster now has a house that looks like crap due to an inadequately specified and installed roof.
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Last edited by jagans; 05-24-2013 at 09:48 AM.
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Old 05-24-2013, 06:24 PM   #23
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New home roofing rippling/deflection issue


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Originally Posted by daldelta View Post
JS: Can you please explain how they interfere with the air flow? Thanks
Read through this, it should answer any questions you may have. http://www.airvent.com/professional/...shooting.shtml

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