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-   -   Nail gun shock injuries (http://www.diychatroom.com/f9/nail-gun-shock-injuries-30855/)

dswan388 10-29-2008 12:37 PM

Nail gun shock injuries
 
Hello everyone,

I'm new to the forum but had a few questions for everyone regarding nail guns and shock related injuries.

I'm a student at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and for one of my grad classes we are applying axiomatic design to manufacturing tools and processes to improve them (don't worry, I don't know what axiomatic design is either :-P) . Our group decided to look into nail guns and the possibility of creating some kind of shock absorbing system to help eliminate shock related injury.

I have very little experience with nail guns (especially over long periods of time) and wanted to ask a more experienced group about these particular injuries. Would you say there is a high risk in frequent nail gun users to develop repetitive strain injury or shock injury due to the constant impact of the nail gun? What sort of injuries have you had yourself? Do you feel tingling in your arm after a day’s worth of nailing? Any information you can provide would be extremely helpful to our project. I appreciate and anxiously await your replies.

-Dan

Shamus 10-29-2008 01:43 PM

Interesting project.

I'm sure there will be a few framing guys along to give more info than I can provide because of my limited use. However, I typically run several hundred nails through both my guns whenever I pick them up. One for roofing and the other for sheeting/flooring.

In my case it's the weight of the nailer that gets to me. The shock to my hand or arm is nothing compared to the ache at the end of the day associated with manuerving them into position. You don't really have to push them much to activate the safety and shoot a nail so recoil isn't that much of a shock. But what do I know, again, limited use and those that run thousands of nails before lunch may have a different take.

buletbob 10-29-2008 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Shamus (Post 178377)
Interesting project.

I'm sure there will be a few framing guys along to give more info than I can provide because of my limited use. However, I typically run several hundred nails through both my guns whenever I pick them up. One for roofing and the other for sheeting/flooring.

In my case it's the weight of the nailer that gets to me. The shock to my hand or arm is nothing compared to the ache at the end of the day associated with manuerving them into position. You don't really have to push them much to activate the safety and shoot a nail so recoil isn't that much of a shock. But what do I know, again, limited use and those that run thousands of nails before lunch may have a different take.

No problems here!.

OldNBroken 10-31-2008 12:39 AM

Roofing/siding nailers really don't have much recoil that would necessitate shock absorbtion. We'd only complain that that mechanism just added more weight to the gun.

We're roofers, at the end of a long day our entire body usually aches. Then we get up the next day and do it all over again...and again...and again...Stay in school dswan or it will be YOU answering these questions in 25 years.

:(:(:(:(

shumakerscott 11-09-2008 01:14 AM

The recoil is not the problem. It is the weight of stretching out with the gun. Also the noise. I have just used a Senco on my roof and HAD to use ear plugs. It is as loud as a 22. My right ear still rings a little. Dorf Dude

mark942 11-09-2008 05:22 AM

I have used a Hitachi frame nail gun for years. What I notice Is when the slide hits the nail the initial hit makes the nail gun bounce a bit, then the retraction of the slide made the nail gun have the shock your referring to. It was for the most part absorbed in my wrist, then making my forearm a recoil spring, so to speak. When using a nail gun for like say a multi unit building (Specifically, New Construction Walls ) I would after time have to hold the nail gun head with my other hand to make it a bit easier to keep the recoil/shock down to a minimum. My thoughts are that the head of the nail gun is to heavy. There is no real spring for the hammer slide when it retracts. Putting all the recoil/shock in the head of the nail gun. That said my hand is the absorption and my forearm would be the recoil spring. Hope my rambling was of some help.
Good Luck...................

OH Yeah,,,,,,,,,,,as for injuries..............Carpel tunnel surgery right hand. CTS in left hand. I can not say that this is a direct result from using nail guns. But I am certain it did not help.

the roofing god 11-10-2008 02:45 AM

I like the little push it gives you,and use it to travel to the next nail position--33 yrs-no repetitive injuries-done 30 sq. per day many times(about 9600 nails)

laxpanther 11-18-2008 10:01 AM

Not with Nail Guns...
 
But if you want to investigate shock related injury, you should look at rotary-hammers (hammer-drills). I can't say we've had injuries specific to them, but after a stretch of drilling into concrete decks, hands feel pretty funky. Mostly a numb pins and needles feeling that radiates to the arm, especially when picking up another tool or handling material.

It goes away fairly quickly, but its significantly more noticeable than any trauma from using a nail gun or any other hand tool I have used.

- Matt

AaronB 11-23-2008 11:53 AM

THe nail gun IS the shock related injury solution.

Try hammering for 40 years.

nap 11-23-2008 01:01 PM

well, I do know what axiomatic means (self evident or obvious would seem to be the most appropriate definition for this situation) and I cannot see how it would apply to tool design. There is very little that is axiomatic other than if you hit your finger with a hammer, it will hurt. Injuries due to equipment design are actually as opposite from axiomatic as you can get, generally. It is the injuries caused by issues not evident that are the worst problems. You know, the things the engineers overlook because they are not obvious.

Tell the teacher you want to work on ergonomic design instead.

the roofing god 11-24-2008 06:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AaronB (Post 188980)
THe nail gun IS the shock related injury solution.

Try hammering for 40 years.

excellent Aaron,you are so right,,another big problem tool for shock is the sawzall

nap 11-24-2008 07:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the roofing god (Post 189366)
excellent Aaron,you are so right,,another big problem tool for shock is the sawzall

especially if you don't pay attention to where the cord is!!!

http://llamasery.com/forums/images/smilies/shocker.gif


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