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AlexHouse 03-12-2012 01:35 AM

Gutters: Joining two gable roof planes together funnels water into the corner
 
My question: Is there gutter technology (big pipes?) which handles a roof design in which two gable ends, say a front and a side of the house are both gables and the roof planes meet at the front+side corner? The problem I see is that those roof planes are going to be funneling all the rain and snow down to a very small point, or small length of gutter, at which the gutter is attached rather than funneling all the water down to a length of gutter that runs parallel to the roof plane.

If there is a way to handle a gusher of water that results from two roof planes meeting at a common point, then that opens up some design options for me. If there is no way to handle this problem then I won't bother with a roof design that creates that problem.

Obviously the reason I'm asking is that I'd like to go this route but I'm not sure if the water concentration problem can be addressed, so telling me that the easier option is to avoid the design is something I already know. What I don't know is if the problem is solvable. Can anyone with knowledge on this issue give me some words of advice?

AlexHouse 03-12-2012 03:05 AM

I found this image on the web and it illustrates what I was trying to explain with words.


http://nwjoinery.com/planbook/img/sa...rge_dormer.gif

Hidden behind the tree is the corner into which the two intersecting roof planes drain. That's a lot of surface area draining down into one corner.

Is this just bad roof design and the owners have to deal with gushers of water concentrating into a corner or are oversized pipes the workable and easy solution or am I concerned about something that may happen but rarely does and these roof designs are not really a problem?

Anyone? Bueller?

CplDevilDog 03-12-2012 06:15 AM

I believe standard practice is a "splash guard". A vertical piece of flashing that follows the outside gutter edge and is 2 or 3" taller than the surrounding gutter. Water hits it and is diverted left and right.

I'll see if I can find a photo later

AtlanticWBConst. 03-12-2012 09:42 AM

Gutter Valley Splash Guards come as a flat section of aluminum that is then formed into an inside gutter corner & installed.

Examples Here:

http://www.gutterworks.com/gutter_splash_guards.htm

http://www.guttermaterials.com/splash_guards.html

We usually buy them direct from our local gutter-parts supplier, who then drops a gutter parts order off at our job worksite address. I am not sure where else you can obtain them from locally. You could order them online (?)

You could also get online and search for a local supplier that you may be able to pick up from, or can ship. The costs would likely be considerably less than some of the online sellers.

Ravenworks 03-12-2012 09:54 AM

"Big Pipes" I switched all my gutters to 6" last year,what a difference.
The water problems that I had around here were of epic proportion.

Windows on Wash 03-12-2012 04:41 PM

Splash guards and jumbo (6") gutters will probably solve about 95% of the issues.

AndyGump 03-12-2012 06:52 PM

I solved a problem like this for a local home owner by designing and having installed a special header in the inside corner.
We don't get snow here so I am not sure if that would be a plausible solution to your question.

Andy.


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