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Old 09-23-2011, 10:43 PM   #16
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-Q-
I don't know a lot about concrete domes, the geodesics are quite different from what you descrbe. However, I did find a website called www.dometimes.com and it's a collection of people who live in, or appreciate dome homes. You may want to try that group to source some solutions, as you may find someone who lives in, or has experience with concrete domes. I hope you find something that works for you

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Old 10-05-2011, 01:33 AM   #17
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The situation you are in is a very common one for dome home owner's. Also one I am very familiar with, as this what we do. We are based in Savannah, GA and have re-roofed domes from Canyon Lake, CA to, currently north of Burlington, VT. We are a full service roofing company that install types of roof systems but domes are a different animal entirely. One thing to be aware of is to not believe everything you hear. The reason you will not find us advertising everywhere is that our customers should be the first place to enquire as to whether a specialized dome roofed is and/or was needed. I am on a dome now in VT as I stated and am enroute to Baltimore, with two other dome stops en-route. Feel free to contact me via email and I will put you in contact with any and all of the hundreds of customers that you would like to have your roof replaced once correct as opposed to several times in the same 30 year span. It seems strange that someone actually specializes in these roofs but you will find my father on Dome Times explaining what I have stated here. His company is New Age Dome Construction. I hope to hear from you it is terrible to he re-roofing a home that was done only a few years ago and finding the damage that we find in such a short period of time.
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Old 10-05-2011, 01:40 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by shazapple View Post
Why not cover it with a modbit or EDPM membrane?

For the flat areas, what is there for insulation? If you are looking to get slope for drainage you can add tapered insulation and top it with one of the above mentioned membranes.

Henry (aka Bakor) and others have elastomeric coatings that you might be able to use. I have no experience with these on a concrete surface though
If you attempt to do this you will see the home rot from the inside out in an even shorter period of time. Please contact me for a client reference list. Do not take someone's word for it talk to people who have been there and now have the proper roof system installed.
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Old 10-05-2011, 01:48 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by -Q- View Post
Well, I've had the home for 5 or 6 years now and I'm slowly just watching it fall to ruin. Still haven't found a solution or anyone to help.

I had resigned to pay for a Rhino Shield treatment (like the truck-bed stuff, they do that for houses now too!) but the full Monty quote was $40k, when we asked for a breakdown of the quote he said he couldn't do that, it would just be $40K. So that fell through

Currently the plaster is falling off all over the inside from the outside leaks and when it rains we put buckets all over in their now "designated locations", heh. Although we are well beyond the problem of "a leak and a crack", in general concrete can be frustrating to the interior since any water coming in first soaks into the concrete, then works its way through the soaked concrete to wherever it feels it should go, and eventually works out through any plaster that also decided it has already soaked up enough water or where there's a crack for it to run off.

I'll PM you my normal email address to offer any of my experience though since any data might be helpful data when troubleshooting or choosing a direction to go.
I do not get time often to respond to this board. Q feel free to contact me via email, I have it on me all the time. Also look into Dome Times and read what John Johnson has posted. Ensure you do your homework and check all of the Dome customers of the proposed roofed before making a decision. Also, again sealing a dome off such as with an elastomeric or rubber membrane, even Grace ice and water is bad news. Talk to the customers I am working for right now. Thanks Dan.
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Old 10-05-2011, 09:09 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by prestigeroofing View Post
If you attempt to do this you will see the home rot from the inside out in an even shorter period of time. Please contact me for a client reference list. Do not take someone's word for it talk to people who have been there and now have the proper roof system installed.
So what would be the preferred method of re-roofing these things? I've never come across one so I assumed they would be similar to a concrete deck type roof.
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Old 04-21-2013, 01:34 PM   #21
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I know this is an old post but I hope the OP is listening. I too have an AID-ome that had absolutely junk concrete work done on the seams. It was unfinished inside, just framing and an electrical box. And it was leaking like a sieve. The first night we "camped" inside it rained and we could only find one spot directly under the cupola that wasn't dripping Oh well I thought I knew what I was getting into
I chiseled out cracks then used concrete caulk to fill. Once that was done I used a elastomaric paint. Worked OK for about 3 years now leaks are starting again. Rather than caulking and repainting every two years has anyone come up with a better solution for these AID-omes? I'm seriously considering attaching a wood framework then sheathing and shingles Would love to hear any real solutions. AID-omes is about useless when it comes to talking about leaks. Not good do future biz I suppose
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Old 04-21-2013, 03:29 PM   #22
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My choice would be to use LIC Lightweight insulating concrete on the low slope areas, sloped at 1/4 inch per foot minimum to drain, then install a fully adhered fleece backed membrane like Fibertite 45 mil FBXT, or Sarnafil 60 Mil Fleece backed membrane with proper base and counter flashings to the dome. For the dome I would spray it with polyurethane foam and coat it with silicone.

The urethane foam will kill the expansion and contraction, and the fleece backed membrane on the low slope areas will provide a shear plane to deal with the movement.

You can use the fleece backed material on the dome also, but you are going to have a lot of waste, and no insulation so SPUF is the best way to go there.
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Old 04-21-2013, 05:42 PM   #23
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Hi jagas - don't know about the light weight concrete but that spray polyurethane roofing foam looks like it might be the real deal solution! I've contacted two contractors in my area to get estimates.
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Old 04-21-2013, 06:21 PM   #24
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Hi jagas - don't know about the light weight concrete but that spray polyurethane roofing foam looks like it might be the real deal solution! I've contacted two contractors in my area to get estimates.
That is the only solution that I would use. Lightweight insulating concrete is used all the time over concrete decks to get slope and add R- Value. The benefit to it is that you do not have to miter it at 45 degrees to get 4 way slope. It is the best way to accomplish what you are trying to do. Your low slope roofs that abut your dome should be done first, and a proper counter flashing should be installed. They should then be protected, and PUF should be applied to your dome. All moisture should be removed before applying foam. Proper prep is everything, as usual. I bet Your energy bills are going to be cut in half.
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Old 04-21-2013, 07:10 PM   #25
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ok....this will sound nuts.. but what about fiberglass and resin =, then gelcoat. I have a flat roof and fiberglass and resin 5 years ago and it water proof and has not changed at all, even in the phoenix sun.
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Old 04-21-2013, 10:19 PM   #26
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Domes, Quonset huts and Oil Storage tanks are the perfect application for spray applied polyurethane foam with a silicone coating.
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Old 04-22-2013, 09:07 AM   #27
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Bobinphx - I've thought about fiberglass cloth and epoxy. I've been building/repairing sailboats for many years and have wetted out hundreds of yards of cloth. Man what a mess and the thought of about 1100sqft Plus it's a pain to do on anything but horizontal surface, point up Off horizonal it's usually a multi wet out. So for me it's no DIY project.
Did you DIY or hire the work? What was the cost if you don't mind?

Does anyone have experience with the SPF roofing, i.e. DIY? Where did you buy the tools and foam? For this Dome I'd need to rent a lifter for the application. Thanks for any inputs.
Edward
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Old 04-22-2013, 09:49 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by Edward50 View Post
Bobinphx - I've thought about fiberglass cloth and epoxy. I've been building/repairing sailboats for many years and have wetted out hundreds of yards of cloth. Man what a mess and the thought of about 1100sqft Plus it's a pain to do on anything but horizontal surface, point up Off horizonal it's usually a multi wet out. So for me it's no DIY project.
Did you DIY or hire the work? What was the cost if you don't mind?

Does anyone have experience with the SPF roofing, i.e. DIY? Where did you buy the tools and foam? For this Dome I'd need to rent a lifter for the application. Thanks for any inputs.
Edward
Spraying your Dome with SPUF is not a DIY job. It is something you want a professional to do. The equipment is expensive, and learning to apply foam evenly, and in the correct thickness takes time. Some things are better left to the pro's. This is one of them.
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Old 04-23-2013, 07:01 AM   #29
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Talked with an installer yesterday. Looks like the cost will be in the $5k-$6K range for about 1100sqft 3inch thick. That's the full Monty, cleaning, etching, SPF, then covering with primer and two top coats of a silicon based paint. The price also includes lift rental for a week about $800.
Does that price seem reasonable/competitive?
They said the paint should be good for 10years before a repaint is needed. I suppose the repaint can be DIY

I have no idea how much even standard roofing costs. I was a roofer about 35 years ago installing cedar shakes but I never knew the cost even then, just put them on
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Old 04-23-2013, 08:34 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward50 View Post
Talked with an installer yesterday. Looks like the cost will be in the $5k-$6K range for about 1100sqft 3inch thick. That's the full Monty, cleaning, etching, SPF, then covering with primer and two top coats of a silicon based paint. The price also includes lift rental for a week about $800.
Does that price seem reasonable/competitive?
They said the paint should be good for 10years before a repaint is needed. I suppose the repaint can be DIY

I have no idea how much even standard roofing costs. I was a roofer about 35 years ago installing cedar shakes but I never knew the cost even then, just put them on
We are not supposed to discuss price, but it seems reasonable to me. Preparation is key. There must be no moisture in the existing roof, because foam rises by catalytic action which creates a lot of heat. Heat + Water = Steam = Blister.

The foam has to be applied in lifts to get 3 inch thickness.

Installation of correct cut in counter flashings at low slope areas is critical, and is the weak point in most foam contractors knowledge bank.

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