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Old 10-03-2007, 06:28 PM   #46
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Cobra Ridge Vent Or Air Vent Shinglevent ll ?


Ed, as long as you brought up experts.com site I thought you might get a kick out of what Brad Zacharia (one the experts from the site) had to say about my roof when I told him the GAF rep said he did not think the exposed nails would be a problem. This all was said after I sent the photos to the GAF rep via email.

Any idiot that says those nails are of no concern is a giant idiot. Tell him I said so. Call someone at GAF and tell them what he said. They need to fire his ass! He might also be a local roofer that GAF has a connection with to look at claims in his area. Each one of those nails will eventually be a leak. Right now the shingles are soft and will grip around the nail. As time goes on the shingle will get brittle and dry. It then will no longer grip and seal the nail. Also, times of expansion and contraction will open up the space around the nail. That guy is royally stupid and GAF needs to know it- that's how bad his opinion is. You are also not looking for just a "sure start" warranty as that last for only a few years. If you have a 30 year shingle you want a roof that will not leak for 30 years. What are you going to do at year 5 or whenever the Sure Start warranty expires and they then tell you they are not guaranteeing the roof at all because it was installed incorrectly?

Again, that guy's a moron!

Let me know how you called GAF and what they say.

I more than chuckle every time I read it.

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Old 10-03-2007, 06:47 PM   #47
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Cobra Ridge Vent Or Air Vent Shinglevent ll ?


Yup, I Google-mapped Orchard Hill Rd., and you can still see the strip clear as day to the left of the road. The wear marks in the grass where the bulk of landing and taxiing took place are still visible. The planes, alas, are no longer there.

I have to say taking off and landing on that strip got the pulse going up a notch!
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Old 10-03-2007, 06:52 PM   #48
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Cobra Ridge Vent Or Air Vent Shinglevent ll ?


Doc,

I imagine you agree wholeheartedy with Brads point he was making too.

It sounds brutal, but it seems to be the absolute truth.

Ed
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Old 10-03-2007, 06:52 PM   #49
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Cobra Ridge Vent Or Air Vent Shinglevent ll ?


Doc,

I imagine you agree wholeheartedy with Brads point he was making too.

It sounds brutal, but it seems to be the absolute truth.

Ed
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Old 10-03-2007, 09:11 PM   #50
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Yes, quite so!
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Old 10-04-2007, 11:38 AM   #51
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Cobra Ridge Vent Or Air Vent Shinglevent ll ?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed the Roofer View Post

PAV's actually cost more money to operate and suck the conditioned air out of the interior environment. I will find the research article which backs thias up and post it later on.

Ed
Here is one of the resources that point out the inefficiency of Powered Attic Ventilators.

Ed

Buildings


Home > Buildings > Knowledge Library > Heating And Cooling > Scientific Spin On PAVs



The Scientific Spin on PAVs
Cooling off hot attics with powered attic ventilators (PAVs) seems like a good idea. After all, doesn't cooler attic air mean less work for the HVAC system, longer shingle life, and reduced energy costs? Unfortunately that's more myth than fact. Studies have shown that under the best of circumstances, PAVs consume more energy than they save. Under the worst of circumstances, they can start a house fire by causing flame rollout from combustion appliances. Let's examine four important facts that help dispel the myth of PAV benefits:
  1. Radiant heat is the root of most evil.
    In attic spaces, hot air (convective heat) is a minor factor compared with the radiant heat from the sun on the roof. Radiant heat, if not controlled, will be absorbed and transmitted to interior spaces via the underlying building components (conduction heating). PAVs only target the hot air.
  2. Some codes should never be broken .
    The problem of radiant heat being transmitted into interior spaces can and should be addressed by bringing the attic space insulation up to current building codes. That means using the right grade of insulation and installing it properly, leaving no misalignment, gaps, or compression to negate its benefit.
  3. The path of least resistance can be costly and dangerous.
    When the PAV starts running, it has to suck air from somewhere. Studies have found that conditioned air in the house is typically being sucked into the attic through numerous small and sometimes not so small openings between the attic and interior space. This happens because it's easier to draw from than the intended outdoor air supply. In addition to sucking dollars out of the homeowner's pocket, this situation becomes life threatening if the sucking is strong enough to draw toxic carbon monoxide fumes into the living space or cause flame rollout from combustion appliances.
  4. And the walls can come tumbling down.
    As cool interior air gets sucked into the attic, the interior space tries to equalize pressure by sucking warm moist air down chimneys or through cracks in ducts, walls, and floor systems. The end result is that the interior space is actually being warmed in stark opposition to the PAV's objective. The damage doesn't always stop with wasted energy dollars. That warm moist air can flow in and condense on cold metal air-conditioning equipment and ductwork. The condensation will generally find its way to wood or sheetrock surfaces and can result in damage such as falling ceilings.
For years, Advanced Energy's Bruce Davis has been involved with studies that demonstrate the disadvantages of PAV usage. A study of eight houses with PAVs in the Research Triangle Park area of North Carolina revealed that the house was being depressurized to varying extents in every case.
Rumor has it that Davis has mounted a couple of PAVs on his research lab wall to serve as hunting trophies of a beast that ought to be driven to extinction. If builders and homeowners insist on perpetuating the species, Davis advises that harmful effects from PAVs can be reduced by:
  • Ensuring that the ceiling is sealed airtight to prevent air transfer and moisture problems
  • Using large attic vents to provide adequate air intake
  • Confirming through performance testing or equipment specifications for combustion equipment that combustion products are not being backdrafted into the space
For More Information
Contact Advanced Energy at (919) 857-9000 or moreinfo@advancedenergy.org.
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Old 05-21-2008, 07:57 AM   #52
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Cobra Ridge Vent Or Air Vent Shinglevent ll ?


Exactly how does the ShingleVentII keep from having wind driven rain from entering the attic?

I just had my roof re-shingled and replaced the old metal ridge vent with Shingle Vent II, but when looking at the sections, It appears that during a high wind event, water could make it thru the vents and into the attic?

I read the data on the Shingle Vent II and water intrusion data, indicated that there test, results were none.

Is it the upturn (where the weep holes are located)in front of the vent that deflects the blowing rain from entering the vent?

Hurricane area, Panama City Florida,
Vent was screwed down vs nailing.

Thanks Bob
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Old 05-21-2008, 11:25 AM   #53
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As the wind driven rain gets pushed up the slope of the roof, it encounters the exterior baffle and creates a votex for the wind to swirl in a tumbleweed style over the baffle, creating additional drow of hot attic air OUT of the vent, rather than pusing the air into the vent.

Unbaffled ridge vents will, and I have 4 seperate examples from my earlier years, allow the wind and the elements, such as rain and powdery snow to blow into the attic.

They have a very good 17 minute long video cd on the wind and rain testing done by an independent labratory to simulate real world extremes up to 110 mph and substantiate the differences in various brands.

Ed
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Old 05-21-2008, 01:43 PM   #54
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Thanks for the quick response, I choose the shingle vent II based on several reviews from Pro-roofers. I had the roofing team use 2" screws (I picked up for them). Hopefully the Hurricane seasons in the future will be mild, I am in Panama City, Fl. I will also test the pine needle collection on the vent, since my yard is heavy with pine trees. My old metal vent, would collect a few pine needles, but very few, so I don't think this will be a problem, I check the roof several times a year, an remove any debris.

Thanks Bob

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