Can You Tell How Old This Flashing Is, From This Photo? - Roofing/Siding - DIY Home Improvement | DIYChatroom


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Roofing/Siding

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-12-2013, 06:48 AM   #16
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 14
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Can you tell how old this flashing is, from this photo?


Looking across the street, it seems like the high chimneys, close to the eaves and without extra support, are the norm around here:



My house was build in 1893, I believe.

As far as the red paint is concerned, that all happened during a time when we had our first baby and renovated a kitchen at the same time. It was also the first time I had ever dealt with contractors or renovations (or babies), so I can't say that I was experienced enough (or awake enough) to have it done right. That working relationship ended badly, perhaps because he knew that the DuroSeal coat and the red paint weren't up to snuff.

But that was when I was young and dumb (2 and a half years ago); now I have a much better grasp on things house-wise (and baby-wise), at least in the sense that I am building up my knowledge base, understanding how the parts of the house work as a unit, using my resources and vetting the contractors myself.

Advertisement

bigdaddydavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 09:24 AM   #17
Exterior Construction
 
Windows on Wash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Washington DC Metro Area (VA, MD, DC)
Posts: 7,129
Rewards Points: 3,292
Default

Can you tell how old this flashing is, from this photo?


I think you are, as noted before, probably due for a re-build.

Tough to say how old that thing is but I think you are fast approaching the point where it begins to be cost prohibitive to fix the existing unit.
Windows on Wash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 11:34 AM   #18
Roofmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,669
Rewards Points: 2,096
Default

Can you tell how old this flashing is, from this photo?


Quote:
Originally Posted by joecaption View Post
I'm no mason by any streach, and have never built a chimmney in my life and never want to but do any of you tradesman see any reason why that chimmney need to be that high?

May be one of those things where you would need to be there to see the big picture to see what's around it to block the air flow.
Hey Joe. A lot of it has to do with getting the smoke from burning wood up into the airflow over the rooftops. Wind tunneling between the houses, and over the rooftops causes some serious turbulence down low. I don't know what type of exhaust is being produced now, but if they aren't burning wood, they can probably get away with a much shorter chimney. I think the old masons rule of thumb was the rule of ten. That is, you can't hit the roof surface if you project a horizontal line ten feet back from the flue. Obviously, a chimney on a roof of higher slope like this one is going to need a chimney that projects pretty high above the surface of the roof. Some of it has to do with style too. Victorian Homes usually have pretty tall chimneys.

I don't think the flashing was ever replaced on this roof, because it would have been opening up a bucket of worms that the roofer had no idea how to handle.

Of course, we do not know the whole story. The roofer that did this was probably the low bidder.

I once lost a bid to a competitor on a fairly large commercial project by around 6K as I recall. I met the owner of the company that I lost the bid to on a cross county flight to the NRCA convention, and we got to talking about the job. Here's what he said to me, and I never forgot it.

"You know what your problem is? You know too damn much. I have three estimators, and all three of them don't know a damn thing about roofing. I hired them right out of college. They go out and estimate the job, I get the job, then I go in for extras on the stuff they missed. 85% of the time the extras go through without a hitch, and for the other 15% of the time I have lawyers that sue for the extras. 99.9% of the time I get the 15 % without a problem because the owners don't want the hassle and bad rep associated with a lawsuit."

Since we were on a 747 with the upstairs lounge, I retired to the lounge to drink. What a world we live in.
__________________
" A lot of men build things, and a lot of things fall down "

jagans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 04:10 PM   #19
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 14
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Can you tell how old this flashing is, from this photo?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
Did you try washing it with TSP?
Are you referring to the red paint or to the white layer? Just this morning I was wondering if there was a compound that would dissolve the DuroSeal (or whatever it is) and paint, but not the stucco, so that I could see if the stucco was actually over the flashing.
bigdaddydavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2013, 04:53 PM   #20
Roofmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,669
Rewards Points: 2,096
Default

Can you tell how old this flashing is, from this photo?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Brushjockey View Post
Maybe Jagens should take this one- I hear hes an expert on just about anything.
Geez Thanks Brush!

I personally think that they probably need to completely rebuild the chimney.

The very worst thing you can do to brick masonry is coat it with an impermeable coating. Brick has to be able to release moisture through evaporation.

The second worse thing you can do is to leave the top open to act like a funnel. Moisture cannot get out, and the brick has been going through freeze thaw cycles for a couple of years now and is probably getting to the point where it is dangerous to walk between the houses. Judging from the height of the chimney this is a job for a professional mason, who will have to erect scaffolding between the houses to demolish and rebuild the chimney. He should set lead coated copper or stainless steel (LCC Preferred) counter flashing in the brick while doing so to cover down over new roof step flashing. Whoever coated this chimney really did the OP a disservice that is going to be very costly to properly repair.
__________________
" A lot of men build things, and a lot of things fall down "

jagans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2013, 10:31 PM   #21
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 14
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Can you tell how old this flashing is, from this photo?


I climbed up myself and poked around with various tools and did find that the flashing was new, and that it wasn't stucco that was built up along the top of the flashing, but the roofing caulk, which was then painted red and white. There isn't any counterflashing, it is just caulked. So, there's nothing there that could entitle me to any sort of reimbursement or anything with the insurance company or the contractor who did the work. It's just poor workmanship.

That said, I talked to the wife and we think that converting our conventional fireplace to a direct-vent gas fireplace is the way to go in the front of the house, and in the back of the house, we will convert the furnace to a power vent and either power vent the water heater also or replace it. So, the chimneys would no longer be needed and will be removed below the roofline and roofed over. The lack of chimney maintenance will be a big relief!
bigdaddydavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2013, 10:39 PM   #22
Roofmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,669
Rewards Points: 2,096
Default

Can you tell how old this flashing is, from this photo?


Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdaddydavy View Post
I climbed up myself and poked around with various tools and did find that the flashing was new, and that it wasn't stucco that was built up along the top of the flashing, but the roofing caulk, which was then painted red and white. There isn't any counterflashing, it is just caulked. So, there's nothing there that could entitle me to any sort of reimbursement or anything with the insurance company or the contractor who did the work. It's just poor workmanship.

That said, I talked to the wife and we think that converting our conventional fireplace to a direct-vent gas fireplace is the way to go in the front of the house, and in the back of the house, we will convert the furnace to a power vent and either power vent the water heater also or replace it. So, the chimneys would no longer be needed and will be removed below the roofline and roofed over. The lack of chimney maintenance will be a big relief!
Smart Move if you ask me. Dont wait too long to demo those beasts, if you can manage it.

Good luck to you.
__________________
" A lot of men build things, and a lot of things fall down "

jagans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2013, 10:55 AM   #23
Concrete & Masonry
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,796
Rewards Points: 2,144
Default

Can you tell how old this flashing is, from this photo?


Quote:
Originally Posted by jagans View Post
I think the old masons rule of thumb was the rule of ten. That is, you can't hit the roof surface if you project a horizontal line ten feet back from the flue. Obviously, a chimney on a roof of higher slope like this one is going to need a chimney that projects pretty high above the surface of the roof. Some of it has to do with style too. Victorian Homes usually have pretty tall chimneys.
It's actually the "3' & 2' in 10' rule", and is still required by code in most any area that I know of. This is only required of full masonry, wood burning chimney's as far as I know. The rule is that the top of the flue must be a minimum of 3' above the highest point of roof that it penetrates, and must also be at least 2' higher than the roof in a 10' horizontal plane..........

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdaddydavy View Post
Are you referring to the red paint or to the white layer? Just this morning I was wondering if there was a compound that would dissolve the DuroSeal (or whatever it is) and paint, but not the stucco, so that I could see if the stucco was actually over the flashing.
To me, the red "paint" looks like it could be "RedGuard", which is typically used to waterproof tile backer board in tile showers, etc....

Advertisement

jomama45 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to jomama45 For This Useful Post:
jagans (04-19-2013)
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Repair or Replace Roof-to-Wall flashing Learn as i go Roofing/Siding 9 09-25-2014 12:53 PM
Re-roofing: flashing question prb_nearnorth Roofing/Siding 9 05-01-2012 12:42 AM
the very best materials for replacement chimney flashing are? DIherself Roofing/Siding 10 04-19-2012 09:22 AM
Flashing repair Squash_Pro Roofing/Siding 9 05-07-2010 01:50 PM
Vinyl siding corner posts and flashing on dormers rhastler Building & Construction 7 06-05-2009 11:08 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts