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-   -   Tile to Linoleum to Tile (http://www.diychatroom.com/f84/tile-linoleum-tile-180393/)

greentrees 05-23-2013 11:45 PM

Tile to Linoleum to Tile
 
3 Attachment(s)
I would like to keep my linoleum in the kitchen and wanted to put tile in the front dining room and the back living room. Would this type of transition look funny? I couldn't find any examples of such a setup.

I was wondering what type of transition strip is used, and how much space I need to put between the tile and linoleum.

oh'mike 05-24-2013 07:03 AM

You need to tell us a bit more---how high will the tile be compared to the sheet goods?

Are you on a concrete slab or wood framed floor?

I make wood transitions for most jobs---flush to the top of the tile--

Schluter makes many kinds of metal edges--these look nice,but would be difficult to remove in the future if you ever wanted to change the flooring in the adjoining areas.

greentrees 05-24-2013 11:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1186330)
You need to tell us a bit more---how high will the tile be compared to the sheet goods?

Are you on a concrete slab or wood framed floor?

I make wood transitions for most jobs---flush to the top of the tile--

Schluter makes many kinds of metal edges--these look nice,but would be difficult to remove in the future if you ever wanted to change the flooring in the adjoining areas.


Its on a concrete slab. If you look at the photo, the linoleum is already in place. I will remove the carpet and replace it with tile. I wasn't sure if this would look funny since most people might just replace the linoleum with tile and have it through all three rooms, but I thought the linoleum looks ok, between the tile.

I looked online and couldn't find a linoleum to tile transition photo, so not sure how common this is.

Since both the linoleum and tile will both be on a concrete slab, the tile will be slightly higher. It looks like the Schluter Reno-TK might work.

oh'mike 05-24-2013 03:21 PM

That Schluter trim will look nice, the big draw back is the trim goes under the tile---meaning that if you ever wished to extend the tile into the next room, the row of tiles with the trim under it will need to be removed.

This is why I use wood reducers/transitions----

greentrees 05-24-2013 05:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1186654)
That Schluter trim will look nice, the big draw back is the trim goes under the tile---meaning that if you ever wished to extend the tile into the next room, the row of tiles with the trim under it will need to be removed.

This is why I use wood reducers/transitions----

I didn't think about having to remove it. I'll take a look at the wood reducers/transitions and see if one will work. It would be more convenient long term just in case the linoleum goes bad, and I decide to tile the area in the future.

Thanks

greentrees 08-11-2013 09:40 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1186654)
That Schluter trim will look nice, the big draw back is the trim goes under the tile---meaning that if you ever wished to extend the tile into the next room, the row of tiles with the trim under it will need to be removed.

This is why I use wood reducers/transitions----

Finally got around to removing the carpet and will put in the tile. I can cut the linoleum back as more space is needed. I found a couple of transition strips that might work. The gold one is the Schluter trim style, but as mentioned, it would be difficult to change.

The silver one style seems like it would work since the linoleum had a previous transition strip that was nailed through the linoleum to the cement floor.

Any concerns about using the silver style one (I might choose another color like beige if there is one.

oh'mike 08-12-2013 05:48 AM

The silver ones look kind of cheap ---having the transition on top of the tile creates a cleaning issue----

If you have a table saw,making your own transition is fairly simple--

Those tiles are large---have you checked the floor for flat? Lippage can be a big problem if the floor is not flat.

greentrees 08-12-2013 11:45 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike (Post 1228186)
The silver ones look kind of cheap ---having the transition on top of the tile creates a cleaning issue----

If you have a table saw,making your own transition is fairly simple--

Those tiles are large---have you checked the floor for flat? Lippage can be a big problem if the floor is not flat.

The silver one is cheap, but may be the easiest to install. I could also use wood but would like to blend the transition strip to the floor. It would be nice just to create one, but I do not have a table saw. I was thinking of finding something simple like the grey strip, but find something with a beige tint.

I was going to check Home Depot and Lowes, but not sure if a tile store would have more selection and can cut to the length I need (9 feet). I would think there would be a materials place that can cut something for me.

I'll check the level at the edge. I have some leveler mix and can pour some if it is not level.

JazMan 08-12-2013 01:36 PM

Hi all,

Quote:

Originally Posted by greentrees
The silver one is cheap, but may be the easiest to install.

Actually the opposite is true. The cheap looking wide bar is harder to install. Remember, nails into concrete don't work so good.:no:

Quote:

Originally Posted by greentrees
I found a couple of transition strips that might work. The gold one is the Schluter trim style, but as mentioned, it would be difficult to change.

What makes you think you'll ever want to change it?

The reducer comes in several sizes and you could also use the basic "L", Schiene.

Jaz

greentrees 08-12-2013 04:05 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 1228315)
Hi all,



Actually the opposite is true. The cheap looking wide bar is harder to install. Remember, nails into concrete don't work so good.:no:



What makes you think you'll ever want to change it?

The reducer comes in several sizes and you could also use the basic "L", Schiene.

Jaz

The last transition strip (from carpet to linoleum) used about 6 cement nails and held on pretty well (18 years) and looked good enough. I thought the wide bar would be the easiest to install since I could lay it over the tile and linoleum.

The linoleum will probably be replaced at some point (just due to wear) or a change in style, though it can probably go another 10 years. I might replaced it with tile but didn't plan on it this time. If the transition strip can be replaced without removing the tile, that would provide the flexibility I am looking for.

Doesn't the L style create a problem since the linoleum is so low compared to the tile. Maybe the aluminum in the diagram would work since it has a flange. But still would need to be replaced if I replace the linoleum with tile in the future.

JazMan 08-12-2013 07:24 PM

That flat carpet bar in my opinion looks like :censored:............oh never mind. You must be easy, it's gonna ruin the looks of the new flooring. Plus you think you'll be able to remove it down the road and everything will looks nice. WRONG! The ceramic tile under the bar will be discolored like in pic 3 & 4 and you'll be unhappy.

If you want to be able to remove the ceramic tile edging later you can start with full tiles along that wall and fill the threshold with 2.5" - 3" tiles finished with the proper metal threshold. Later remove the grout between the full tiles and these small guys and remove the tiles edging and all. This will alloy you to install new tiles without any metal, just caulk for expansion.

Jaz

greentrees 08-13-2013 11:48 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by JazMan (Post 1228479)
That flat carpet bar in my opinion looks like :censored:............oh never mind. You must be easy, it's gonna ruin the looks of the new flooring. Plus you think you'll be able to remove it down the road and everything will looks nice. WRONG! The ceramic tile under the bar will be discolored like in pic 3 & 4 and you'll be unhappy.

If you want to be able to remove the ceramic tile edging later you can start with full tiles along that wall and fill the threshold with 2.5" - 3" tiles finished with the proper metal threshold. Later remove the grout between the full tiles and these small guys and remove the tiles edging and all. This will alloy you to install new tiles without any metal, just caulk for expansion.

Jaz

Yeah, that transition is pretty basic. The use of 3" tiles would probably look better. I am going to lay the tiles in a diagonal. Would it look nice if I cut the same tile to 3" and lay them straight across at the transition. I found a few photo examples, but couldn't find one without a pattern in the transition.

The Transition edge seems an appropriate fit since the linoleum will not be exposed. And as you mentioned, I can remove the transition strip by just removing the 3" tiles rather than the 18 inch tiles.

JazMan 08-13-2013 10:24 PM

The diagonal installation adds some difficulty to the deal. Go ahead and finish this room with a border in the jamb the width of the jamb, which should be 4.5" These would be set straight of course.

Jaz


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