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Old 03-03-2009, 12:02 AM   #1
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Tile Floor Slippery


HI
After 2 months with our tile floor installed in our porch, it still looks great.

However, it is a death trap when wet, slippery as ice.

Can I put anything on it, like a polish or finish of some kind to make it a bit safer? They are the standard factory glazed ceramic tiles.

Thanks
Jamie

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Old 03-03-2009, 01:32 AM   #2
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Tile Floor Slippery


Jamie,

You might want to look into a applying a sealer with traction control. There is a product called skid safe, and we also use an additive to sealers that looks like a white powder. I think its called sure step. You can mix it into the sealer then apply it with a heavy duty pump sprayer. Tape off all surrounding areas. Ask your local concrete/ masonry supply store and they should have some good advice too. Hope this helps.

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Old 03-03-2009, 03:52 AM   #3
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Jamie,

You might want to look into a applying a sealer with traction control. There is a product called skid safe, and we also use an additive to sealers that looks like a white powder. I think its called sure step. You can mix it into the sealer then apply it with a heavy duty pump sprayer. Tape off all surrounding areas. Ask your local concrete/ masonry supply store and they should have some good advice too. Hope this helps.
Thanks. I'm glad to know there are products that will work. I'll have to check around for them. Thanks
Jamie
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Old 03-03-2009, 06:51 AM   #4
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Tile Floor Slippery


Sure, there are products that will reduce the coefficient of friction...some actually etch the surface and some are just topical. But that aftermarket industry is rife with liability issues and getting someone to put down a product, or just buying a product, might be harder than you think.

But, that aside, I am wondering who specified a ceramic tile in an outdoor environment, even though it is in a porch...? I imagine Wisconsin winters to be somewhat wet and cold and no matter what the covering of the porch - nor what's underneath it - there would be issues there. I mean even in Florida there are humidity issues...so I think 'ceramic' was not the best choice initially. Porcelain would have been better, and the small price difference would surely have not been a factor not to consider it.
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Old 03-03-2009, 06:55 AM   #5
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Tile Floor Slippery


Ceramic is still around due to the rise of box stores. Otherwise you would not even see this stuff. Best to plan on using a correct flooring, as posted after market applications that work are not DIY projects.
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Old 03-03-2009, 10:11 AM   #6
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Tile Floor Slippery


Bob,

Can you explain what you meant to say, I don't understand a word of it.

Jaz
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Old 03-03-2009, 10:47 AM   #7
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Tile Floor Slippery


it means ceramic tile is quickly being surpassed by the more superior product -> porcelain.
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Old 03-03-2009, 10:58 AM   #8
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Tile Floor Slippery


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it means ceramic tile is quickly being surpassed by the more superior product -> porcelain.
Porcelain IS ceramic tile.
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Old 03-03-2009, 11:11 AM   #9
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Tile Floor Slippery


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Porcelain IS ceramic tile.
Yes, but there is too different classifications. Porcelain, albeit a ceramic tile is made with more refined materials. Porcelain tiles are frequently found in floor applications, outdoor areas, and in cold weather climates where freezing can occur. With their low absorption capability they are less likely to crack in cold weather climates. such as what this poster should have used. The cheaper ceramic class of tile has not real use except for cheap applications, which is what I was talking about. In the past Porcelain (class) was too expensive, but costs are quickly leveling out.
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Old 03-03-2009, 02:42 PM   #10
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Tile Floor Slippery


To Jamie, I just wanted to let you know that I am pretty sure this is the solution to your slippery tile problem.
My friend Jenny had the same problem but it was around her pool deck. She used a product called Johnny Grip, she told me that all you do is mop it on and it stops the tile from being slippery. Jenny said it worked really well. I think there site is www.slipperytile.com You can give it a try. She was happy with it.
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Old 03-03-2009, 07:35 PM   #11
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Tile Floor Slippery


Quote:
Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
Sure, there are products that will reduce the coefficient of friction...some actually etch the surface and some are just topical. But that aftermarket industry is rife with liability issues and getting someone to put down a product, or just buying a product, might be harder than you think.

But, that aside, I am wondering who specified a ceramic tile in an outdoor environment, even though it is in a porch...? I imagine Wisconsin winters to be somewhat wet and cold and no matter what the covering of the porch - nor what's underneath it - there would be issues there. I mean even in Florida there are humidity issues...so I think 'ceramic' was not the best choice initially. Porcelain would have been better, and the small price difference would surely have not been a factor not to consider it.
I thought tiles seemed like a nice idea. It is a room attached to the house, fully enclosed, with a full foundation, but no basement under it. It is insulated with new windows and doors.

I've been to a number of flooring stores and talked to them about several of my flooring projects, including this one. They all seem to be interested in selling laminate flooring, which I am not interested in. There are of course floor stores that deal with tiles, but have found none that were very knowledgeable.

Porcelain / Ceramic? I'm confused. I bought these tiles at home depot, there was a grading system for hardness, and these are rated as the best. For whatever that's worth.

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Old 03-04-2009, 06:31 AM   #12
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Tile Floor Slippery


Well, you're right - tiles are a nice idea, it's just that not-any-ol'-tile-will-do...because it is glazed, the top surface of a ceramic tile is, well like...uh glass. That was intended. However, porcelain tiles are made slightly differently and are not glazed the same. They are almost solid clay and therefore have a rougher top surface besides being denser so they don't absorb moisture the same. That makes porcelain ideal for outdoor applications - they don't absorb mosisture and they don't have a slippery surface.

Even indoors where there are changes in temperature and humidity, ceramics would be slippery, thanks to condensation. A bit like what we have up here: 'black ice'...If underneath the room you have a cooler temperature than the 'living' part of the porch, you will also have condensation issues.

'Hardness' of the tile - or its colour - are not major characterisitics you're looking for in this application.

I would look into putting down area rugs or runners in the main walking area, something moisture-resistant i.e. that won't degrade with moisture. Cotton and wool are out, therefore so are oriental rugs. Nylon is OK, polypropylene or polyester better. Depending on your size of area, $200 can get you an area rug that you could interchange with another one every 6 months or so. Held down with rubber underpadding...
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Old 03-05-2009, 05:54 AM   #13
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Tile Floor Slippery


i wouldn't worry too much as this porch's in wisconsin,,, pretty sure after a couple yr's worth of freeze/that cycles, we'll see this poster again
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Old 08-22-2009, 11:11 PM   #14
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Tile Floor Slippery


Not sure I would waste the money on a rug. After a couple of years the tiles will be cracked anyway. The person who sold you the tiles in a Big Box was probably selling lumber the week before.
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Old 08-23-2009, 11:10 AM   #15
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Tile Floor Slippery


Porch was the wrong word :
"It is a room attached to the house, fully enclosed, with a full foundation, but no basement under it. It is insulated with new windows and doors. "

Only difference from the rest of the house is that I may not keep it up at full temp all the time.

I now realize most people here are thinking of a porch as something outside.
Jamie

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