Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring > Tiling, ceramics, marble

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-28-2009, 07:32 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 121
Share |
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


What will we need to do to accomplish tiling over cement and brick with slate tiles?

Has anyone put in slate tiles over concrete and over brick?

Our house has cement sidewalk at lawn-level (from the driveway) and a brick (covered) step. The brick of the step does not match the brick of the house' body/vertical walls. And, we are looking to tile over both so the path from the driveway to the doorway has a unified look and feel.

Thanks.

1655graff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2009, 02:06 PM   #2
Member
 
ccarlisle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 1,889
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


Looks like everyone's afraid to tell you that this is a recipe for disaster. It is. Slate - unless it's a certain kind and quality - doesn't fare well outdoors. Where are you located?

__________________
“The average American woman is about 25 pounds heavier than she was in 1960...Recognizing obesity as a disease will help change the way the medical community tackles this complex issue that affects approximately 1 in 3 Americans,”
ccarlisle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2009, 04:37 PM   #3
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,118
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


We have rough slate behind our house, installed over a sand base. It has been there since 1959 with no problems. Our slate is grey/red in color, about 1 inch thick, and looks like it came from the New York/Vermont slate mining region. Most of the pieces are about 16 inches square, but they vary in size, as I said this is rough slate. I have never seen slate installed over concrete, not saying it can't be done, but I would be concerned about cracking the slate if the subbase is too rigid.

If it were me, I would probably remove the brick and concrete, and install the stone over a standard subbase of gravel and sand. Standard installation has been covered many times on this forum, do a search and you can read all kinds of posts by knowledgeable installers.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2009, 05:48 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 121
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


Quote:
Originally Posted by ccarlisle View Post
Looks like everyone's afraid to tell you that this is a recipe for disaster. It is. Slate - unless it's a certain kind and quality - doesn't fare well outdoors. Where are you located?
"East Bay" hills of the San Francisco Bay Area.
1655graff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2009, 09:03 PM   #5
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 9,565
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


Slate tiles can have their share of issues but in the SFO area...not to worry. I wouldn't be afraid to install slate over what you have there. I've done plenty of it in Nebraska without any serious issues other than some shaling from winter.

Use an unmodified thinset with an additive to make your own modified thinset. This will work a little better than any of the average (already modified) thinsets you'll find.

Expect some grout cracks at the plane-changes but no big deal otherwise.
Bud Cline is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2009, 06:36 AM   #6
Member
 
ccarlisle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Posts: 1,889
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


Well Daniel, you may have the one type of slate that is the exception to the observation I stated earlier...Vermont region slate is the only one that I know of that would make a suitable choice for most slate applications - even in showers. But on top of being Vermont slate, it is 1" thick and set in a mud-bed! Now that's an installation for you!

IMO anything less than that product and that installation will give you maintenance issues that - OK - the OP may not care about being on a sidewalk. But if it's on his property, he may care how it looks and therefore I am still of the opinion that the chances are the OP is looking at regular, multi-coloured, 3/8" or so -thick slate tiles that come from overseas and unless installed by someone who knows about it, then the chances are very good that the OP will be dissappointed in his choice, maybe not next week but soon.

I am not saying that all slate installations are bad! In fact, Bud, I think you have a picture of a round slate installation you did a few years back, in a back courtyard of a newish house, no? The OP might like to see that. It looked very nice and is, if I remember, a good snapshot of an outdoor slate installation...but correct me if I'm wrong, as I don't recall any other details of the installaton.

The installation issues are significant...over concrete or over brick will take consideration that only experienced installers can provide. But it's all relative: I mean it makes a difference over the "long term" - and who defines "long-term"? Will the OP be just as happy in 2 years, in 5 years, in 10? And how many of us will still be around to care?

Having said all that, there are alternatives. Whether they suit the OP or not - I don't know...
__________________
“The average American woman is about 25 pounds heavier than she was in 1960...Recognizing obesity as a disease will help change the way the medical community tackles this complex issue that affects approximately 1 in 3 Americans,”
ccarlisle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-30-2009, 01:18 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 121
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


So CC and Bud,

I did take a look at your posts along this lines after CC's initial reply (2007, 2006, etc.). 2 questions follow:
a) Bud, you'd recommended Mapei kerabond with keralastic. In your reply to my situation here are you still good with these 2 products?
b) in one reply, someone recommended an "isolating membrane" is that backerboard and/or Ditra?

CC, additionally, I think you (and Bud) raise a good point when you ask me/others how long do we want it to last. Right now, I'd say "Long enuf that I don't feel like I wasted my time doing it." Yes, not a very good answer, I know, but 5 years would be nice. And, once it's been there for that long, of course I'd like another 5 years, etc. etc. etc.

Finally, if I was doing it from scratch, I'd DEFinitely install like Daniel.
1655graff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 04:37 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: hilton head & atlanta
Posts: 2,995
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


whichever you decide, remember - its takes longer to redo your work since you didn't do it correctly the 1st time,,, you can successfully attach slate to conc sidewalks ONLY if you NEVER experience temperatures below 35f,,, keyword's NEVER,,, since you're probably using the ' pretty ' slate stuff from an apron store, that's also a good start towards disaster,,, they don't sell the good stuff !

if you're only satisfied w/5yrs, do whatever you wish, of course !
itsreallyconc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 11:56 AM   #9
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 9,565
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


CC the photo you are referring to went south when my computer developed a virus a couple of weeks ago. I'll have to get all that stuff back one day.

That particular job is about three years old now and doing well. It does experience some routine shaling during the winter and it has now begun to show some staining from iron oxidation. The oxidation has developed below the sealer and can't be removed without stripping the sealer. Those imported slates contain iron ya know.

I have other small slate installations out doors that are showing no issues at all.

The Kerabond Keralastic is still the way to go I think.

I'm not now convinced that using a quality sealer is the thing to do. Never considered stains migrating from below and not being able to get to them to get rid of them. The sealer is working really well I guess.
Bud Cline is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2009, 01:12 PM   #10
long island, NY
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: long island, ny
Posts: 382
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


I know it's not as pretty, but have you considered flagstone in lieu of slate? Flagstone also has a rustic surface, but is very sturdy. then you could bypass any potential slate issues....
diy'er on LI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2009, 05:24 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: hilton head & atlanta
Posts: 2,995
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


both slate & flag're sedentary mtls in that they were formed by pressure on layers of matter,,, granite, by comparison, is igneous - mass liquid which cooled,,, if you want slate, be prepared for faster delamination than you'd expect from flag,,, slate, in the thickness suitable for sidewalk on granular base, will cost more per sf
itsreallyconc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2009, 12:02 PM   #12
long island, NY
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: long island, ny
Posts: 382
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


While I knew both were sedimentary rocks, I never knew that flagstone can flake under normal wear conditions.... we have flagstone in several areas of the yard for 35 years, and not one piece has ever flaked. I guess it was just really high quality stone?
diy'er on LI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2009, 12:17 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: hilton head & atlanta
Posts: 2,995
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


flag's gotten very ' reedy ' over the yrs,,, you probably have older stone which was composed of higher pressure/larger layers mtl,,, it used to be split into size w/steel wedges/hammer & chisel,,, these days, diamond saws are in use - even 48" blades in quarries mtd on 65hp saws cutting 21" deep,,, things change
itsreallyconc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2009, 12:51 PM   #14
long island, NY
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: long island, ny
Posts: 382
Default

slate tile sidewalk?


Quote:
Originally Posted by itsreallyconc View Post
flag's gotten very ' reedy ' over the yrs,,, you probably have older stone which was composed of higher pressure/larger layers mtl,,, it used to be split into size w/steel wedges/hammer & chisel,,, these days, diamond saws are in use - even 48" blades in quarries mtd on 65hp saws cutting 21" deep,,, things change
that's unfortunate.... I hate when I find out that the "new way" is worse than the old. sort of like tile floors today vs 600 years ago. Floors in european cathedrals, heck even pompei!, are still like new. and I'm fretting over ways to make my tile job last over a decade....

diy'er on LI is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Slate tile Termite Flooring 14 04-01-2010 09:05 PM
Slate Tile Roof Cleaning Tampa Florida - Slate Roof Cleaning Using Lift. apple roof cleaning Roofing/Siding 1 12-31-2008 10:01 AM
marble tile over existing slate and concrete flooring bullrage22 Flooring 13 05-19-2008 07:58 PM
Slate Tile... Jshakour Flooring 13 04-24-2008 10:34 PM
Natural Slate tile Akeith Flooring 5 03-21-2006 05:13 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.