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Old 10-28-2011, 11:28 AM   #1
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Hello, I'm getting reedy to lay self stick vinyl tiles over my linoleum kitchen floor. The linoleum is in great shape except for the color....too light & ugly! I'm wondering if I should use primer and if I should wait for dry weather. It's supposed to be a cold rain this weekend. So what do you guys think I should do & please feel free to offer any pointers on doing a really good job...dos & don'ts, etc. Thanks

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Old 10-28-2011, 12:44 PM   #2
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Those "self-stick" floor tiles have never been the best products. The adhesive on the back is always of low quality and the adhesive application is always abbreviated it seems. If I were going to install that product I would use a contact adhesive made for installing VCT floor tiles and spread it with a flat trowel laying down only a very thin skim coat. Allow it to dry because it is a contact adhesive.

THEN install the self stick tiles.

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Old 10-29-2011, 12:47 AM   #3
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Bud is right Ron that sounds like a good plan using the flooring adhesives but I used the tooth end to allow the air trapped under the tile to help cure the glue faster either way will work though and good luck if you ever have to pull it back up
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Old 10-29-2011, 10:33 AM   #4
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but I used the tooth end to allow the air trapped under the tile to help cure the glue faster
I would strongly recommend against that technique. Using a toothed trowel will apply too much glue and the tiles over time will slip and slide and separate and purge sticky adhesive up between the tiles. The flat side of the trowel is all that is required to dispense the proper amount of additional adhesive for [already glued] tiles.
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Old 10-29-2011, 01:13 PM   #5
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As a mater of fact...................your right, now I remember years ago I did use the tooth end and within 2 years some came up next time I will work with the flat trile side. Good post
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Old 10-29-2011, 01:18 PM   #6
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All that is required is a skim coat. By skimming you will be driving adhesive into microscopic pores which will never happen simply by pressing the tile onto the substrate. There is also a small amount of dust that you won't be able to get rid of no matter what you do so skimming will eliminate that issue also. Too much adhesive is always a bad deal.
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Old 10-29-2011, 03:15 PM   #7
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Ok guys this is where I will truly expose my ignorance: how do I apply the skim? With a paint roller or with a trowel...what is a trowel by the way? Thanks for the posts.
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Old 10-29-2011, 04:19 PM   #8
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Quote:
Ronoroc: "how do I apply the skim? With a paint roller or with a trowel..."
Re-read POST #2:
Quote:
POST #2: "spread it with a flat trowel laying down only a very thin skim coat."
Quote:
Ronoroc: "what is a trowel by the way?"
Oh-oh!
A "trowel" is a flat metal blade approximately 4" X 8" with a handle used for a number of masonry type tasks and in this case used to spread adhesive. They are found in all hardware stores, home centers, lumber yards, etc.

Why do I have this strange feeling that maybe................!

Oh well never mind, not important I guess.
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Old 10-30-2011, 02:53 PM   #9
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Hey Bud, strange feeling about what? Please share the thought.
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Old 10-30-2011, 02:56 PM   #10
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Hey Bud, strange feeling about what? Please share the thought.
When things get this far in a thread and near the end the OP asks; "What is a trowel", my leg begins hurt just a little as if it were being pulled by someone. Just a feeling I get once in a while.
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Old 10-30-2011, 03:03 PM   #11
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Please remember I am a novice who used never done this type of a job before. I see there is more to it than I 1st thought.
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Old 10-30-2011, 03:10 PM   #12
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Please remember I am a novice who used never done this type of a job before. I see there is more to it than I 1st thought.
I understand and glad to be of help but some things just surprise me. Sorry, wasn't trying to be offensive. I'm just a natural-born skeptic.
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Old 10-30-2011, 03:31 PM   #13
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Surprised that I didnt know what a trowel is? I know, I tipped my hand on that one. I will probably talk to a contractor friend of mine before starting the project.
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Old 10-30-2011, 03:43 PM   #14
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Surprised that I didnt know what a trowel is? I know, I tipped my hand on that one.
Yup!

Quote:
I will probably talk to a contractor friend of mine before starting the project.
Couldn't hurt.
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Old 10-30-2011, 03:50 PM   #15
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have had peal and stick down for 23 yrs on a 3/4 plywood from my first days in the house never popped a tile,but the only thing with it over the years is sliding chairs on it it does wear out..walking on it no problem....so if the sub floor is dry and new...go for it....

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