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Old 05-30-2010, 09:40 PM   #1
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


Ive tiled plenty at this point but never actually installed a threshold.

Is 1/4 hardiebacker and mapei thinset okay over the 3/4 diagonal wooden subfloor?


Thanks folks
Drew

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Old 05-31-2010, 05:38 AM   #2
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


yes, you should be fine with that approach

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Old 06-01-2010, 04:23 PM   #3
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


HOLD ON!!!

The correct answer to that question is:
ABSOLUTELY NOT!!!

Bob, you should know better than that by now.
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Old 06-01-2010, 05:01 PM   #4
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
HOLD ON!!!

The correct answer to that question is:
ABSOLUTELY NOT!!!

Bob, you should know better than that by now.
Sorry missed the hardwood sub-floor part
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Old 06-01-2010, 05:25 PM   #5
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


Bob I knew you were up on that!
Your answer surprised me. Could you tell?
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Old 06-01-2010, 05:33 PM   #6
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


yeah, been very busy and do not have the time to really respond well these days.
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Old 06-01-2010, 09:36 PM   #7
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


Okay Bud..... I will play the game here


What do you suggest?


And why is the marble threshold that radically different from tile, aside from thickness?

I was kinda hoping for some tips by now (two days later) as Im trying to finish up for my family.

Drew
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Old 06-02-2010, 04:54 AM   #8
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


The marble is not the issue. The wood flooring you are covering is. It moves too much for tile or marble. You need something more stable like exterior grade plywood.
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Old 06-02-2010, 08:26 AM   #9
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


For the specific threshold area... originally a layer of cement lay over the wooden subfloor.

Why plywood and not say a nice white oak plank? Its naturally water resistant, bug resistant and I have lots of it!


Are you saying throw down a strip of wood and then hardiebacker?


Im not hooked on hardiebacker but it seems like a nice transitional substrate before the threshold.
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Old 06-02-2010, 08:46 PM   #10
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


Drew,

You're not understanding what Bob & Bud are telling you. They're saying no Hardie (or any other tile backer) over planks.

But I think you're not doing what everyone thinks you're doing. I'm only guessing since you didn't supply much info.

Sounds to me as if you're just replacing the threshold, not the entire floor. The floor is set over a "mud" floor, as was the old threshold. Is this right? If not please tell us.

BTW, 'nice white oak plank' is not stable at all. No solid wood is.

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Old 06-02-2010, 09:45 PM   #11
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


I hear what your saying Jazman, and I suspect my inquiry was misunderstood and/or I didnt elaborate enough.

I replaced the 60 year old 3/4 diagonal planks which were rotted through with 2 x 12 pressure treated planks. I loathe plywood because it doesnt hold up over time and its still more flexible than Id prefer

I also realized that after having removed the 3/4 subfloor and the 1 inch cement layer sitting atop the wooden subfloor that I needed something to rebuild up. Atop the 2x12s I added the 1/4 hardiebacker which brought me back up to the original height. I also made tenons on every other 2x12s to they would fit under the walls, keeping more support and rigidity. I forged special metal brackets that helped brace the 2x12s under the joists for more stability. Over engineered in one sense, but necessary given the damage to the general structure.

Yet the floor is now lighter than it was (obviously its not a layer of cement) and its much more ridged than plywood. When two inspectors and later a few contractors who were helping me saw it, I got thumbs up from all.

Some of the diagonal wooden subfloor remains but only directly under the threshold area. It extends from other rooms. We had to remove all of the diagonal wooden subfloor in the bathroom due to severe damage. I tried to avoid this lengthy and confusing explanation in my first post.

To whit, I would have to amicably disagree about solid woods stability vs plywood, from my experience, particularly longterm use. I build historical accurate mortise and tenon furniture, often from green wood and some timber framing practice. The reason I mentioned white oak is because it is inherently a very durable wood, able to withstand a lot of stress, water, mold, bugs etc. Plywood glues invariably break down as well, creating instability, as with the pressure treatment. Plywood is only used because its cheaper to create and it can bridge greater distances than a plank by plank approach. Its cheaper to produce too.


Getting back to my question...

What glue/cements are recommended to glue the marble threshold if I used plywood?

Thinset?
Mastic?



cheers
Drew

Last edited by Dyoung; 06-02-2010 at 10:03 PM.
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Old 06-02-2010, 10:21 PM   #12
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?



A furniture builder turned flooring expert.
Do what you want my friend...you will anyway.
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Old 06-03-2010, 09:14 PM   #13
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Marble Thresholds: hardiebacker? thinset ?


Actually sir, I build a wide range of historical reproductions with materials and projects ranging from blacksmithed gates, swords, blades, historically accurate functional suits of armour, fine furniture, textiles, leather, bone, horn and post & beam structures and stone work...for a worldwide cliente including a number of museums and international clientele. Ive read many of your various posts....you seem more interested in scoffing and beloading insults than realizing there are indeed alternate and equally legitimate methods of doing something.

Note....I made NO claim about being a "floor expert" I just know a good deal about wood and plywood; and the history of architectural construction through which I earned my degree! Plywood is a cheap modern stable...but it is not by far the best, nor the only method of flooring or any other use. Im working on a timberframed project. Hand hewn trees. Buildings from the late 19th century started using 2x4s; ever wonder why? Does this mean that timber framing is an inferior form of construction....or laughable for that matter?

Youve spent several posts mocking me Bud.

I asked a simple question, never once attempting to insult you sir.


Last edited by Dyoung; 06-03-2010 at 09:22 PM.
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