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Old 02-17-2011, 12:37 PM   #1
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


Hello,

Last year I remodeled my son's bathroom and used cement durock boards for walls and floors for tiling. This year I am planning to remodel my bathroom. I am going to put new walls with tiles around tub and shower and new tiled floor. I went to HomeDepot and salesman recommended me to use hardibacker boards instead of durock cement boards because it is easy to cut them. However, I am not sure about Hardibacker boards reliability in wet areas.
Any opinion or suggestion please?

Thank you.

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Old 02-17-2011, 01:05 PM   #2
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


Hardie works pretty much as advertised. I'd recommend it too if I was selling it. It's 90% cement. Other concrete backers work fine too. Some are a little heavier, if that matters to you. Remember Hardie 1/2" is not 1/2" thick, (might make a difference), and I do not recommend it be submerged in water. You weren't clear since you said tub & shower. Is it two areas, or a tub that can be used to take a shower?

It's perfectly fine for a tub surround, OK for stall showers if you know the right way.

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However, I am not sure about Hardibacker boards reliability in wet areas.
You can apply a surface waterproofing on any backer. It's the best way to waterproof walls anyway. What method of waterproofing were you gona use?

Jaz

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Old 02-18-2011, 07:57 AM   #3
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


Thanks a lot for your opinion.
In my previous bathroom remodeling project I just attached cement durock boards to studs and then put tiles on them. I did not use any method of waterproofing because I was told that it was not necessary for shower and tub surrounding walls. I am planning to use the same approach again. However, salesman in HomeDepot recommended me to use Hardibacker boards instead of Cement Durock boards as it is easier to cut and install them.
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Old 02-18-2011, 08:40 PM   #4
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


Well, Salesman....at HD? Do you think he knows much more than the very basics? If so, congrats, you've found the one. Did he recommend an adhesive? He didn't mention waterproofing or vapor barrier? Would you like to do the job right this time?

Hardie is just another brand of CBU, there are many.

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However, salesman in HomeDepot recommended me to use Hardibacker boards instead of Cement Durock boards as it is easier to cut and install them.
Great, did he explain how to cut it?

Jaz
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Old 02-19-2011, 12:09 PM   #5
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


There is nothing wrong with Hardibacker, it's a good product. It isn't as messy as the old-fashion cement boards when you cut it. It also isn't as easy to cut as they make it out to be but you can score and break it sorta like drywall.

It does require either a moisture barrier on the studs behind the board or eliminate the moisture barrier and apply a liquid membrane waterproofing to the surface of the board. The latter is the better.
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Old 02-19-2011, 12:16 PM   #6
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


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There is nothing wrong with Hardibacker, it's a good product. It isn't as messy as the old-fashion cement boards when you cut it. It also isn't as easy to cut as they make it out to be but you can score and break it sorta like drywall.

It does require either a moisture barrier on the studs behind the board or eliminate the moisture barrier and apply a liquid membrane waterproofing to the surface of the board. The latter is the better.
Is there any harm in going STUDS | MOISTURE BARRIER | HARDIEBACKER | LIQUID WATERPROOF | THINSET | TILE ?
(meaning, is it ok to do both moisture barrier AND liquid waterproof?)
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Old 02-19-2011, 12:19 PM   #7
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(meaning, is it ok to do both moisture barrier AND liquid waterproof?)
No!

One or the other but not both. If you do both you will trap moisture inside of the wall. Use one method or the other.
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Old 02-19-2011, 12:24 PM   #8
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No!

One or the other but not both. If you do both you will trap moisture inside of the wall. Use one method or the other.

got it, thanks
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Old 02-19-2011, 12:53 PM   #9
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


Back to how to score-cut Hardie. You score - score - score, then snap up towards the score, not down like you'd cut drywall.

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Old 03-03-2011, 08:01 AM   #10
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


I just finished demolishing a shower cabin in my 25 years old master bathroom. Drywalls were attached directly to studs and tiles through thinset to drywalls. No MOISTURE BARRIER, no LIQUID WATERPROOF. Everything was in an excellent condition. No water damage at all. So, why it is necessary to apply liquid waterproof or moisture barrier?
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:02 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by stiksandstones View Post
Is there any harm in going STUDS | MOISTURE BARRIER | HARDIEBACKER | LIQUID WATERPROOF | THINSET | TILE ?
(meaning, is it ok to do both moisture barrier AND liquid waterproof?)
I just finished demolishing a shower cabin in my 25 years old master bathroom. Drywalls were attached directly to studs and tiles through thinset to drywalls. No MOISTURE BARRIER, no LIQUID WATERPROOF. Everything was in an excellent condition. No water damage at all. So, why it is necessary to apply liquid waterproof or to user moisture barrier?



Thanks.
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:04 AM   #12
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


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Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
No!

One or the other but not both. If you do both you will trap moisture inside of the wall. Use one method or the other.
I just finished demolishing a shower cabin in my 25 years old master bathroom. Drywalls were attached directly to studs and tiles through thinset to drywalls. No MOISTURE BARRIER, no LIQUID WATERPROOF. Everything was in an excellent condition. No water damage at all. So, why it is necessary to apply liquid waterproof or to user moisture barrier?
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:30 AM   #13
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


This is nuts!!

I'm outa here.
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Old 03-03-2011, 08:37 AM   #14
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


Hey Guys,
I thought that these links might be of some help. One is a video on to install Hardi-board and the other is a written step-by-step.

http://webapps.easy2.com/cm/flash_ex...ge_id=35737765

http://www.jameshardie.com/homeowner...rterInch.shtml

When I first used Hardi-Board I went over their web site for recommendations and instructions. I like to follow the manufactures guidelines exactly. Jazman is less likely to steer you wrong though, I've read a lot of his posts and he probably knows better than anyone. Hope this helps.-Gregg
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Old 03-05-2012, 02:53 PM   #15
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Hardibacker board vs Cement Durock board


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Originally Posted by JazMan View Post
Back to how to score-cut Hardie. You score - score - score, then snap up towards the score, not down like you'd cut drywall.

Jaz
JazMan - I just stumbled across this discussion on Hardiebacker. I have no tile/stone experience, but like to try many things DIY. I am working on a stone wall project, using hardibacker over sheetrock, screwed through to the studs. No tub or shower, only a single vanity sink in a hallway bath. I am just curious why you snap upwards, that seems counter intuitive. My hunch is going down causes tear-out on the backside of the hardie - is this correct?

Thanks for your time.

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