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Old 07-15-2013, 11:31 PM   #1
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Bathroom Shower tiling


I have a few more questions regarding my project. I've managed to hang all of the durock, and am now ready to use mesh tape and thinset to join the seams.

Firstly, in certain areas, there is a gap about 3/16 of an inch between where the durock meets greenboard. What is the proper method of meshing these wider gaps together? Do I fill the gap with thinset, apply the mesh tape, then another thin layer of thinset? I hope the recommendation isn't to remove the durock and cut another more correct size sheet.

Secondly, how far must the first row of tiles hang? Should they touch the base of the shower pan? Or can I leave about 1/2 an inch between the bottom of the tile and the pan?

Thirdly, I've been placing my 12x12 inch tile along the walls (in random areas) to see how plush it is against the durock. For the most part, it's mostly always plush, but there are areas where it isn't. Will this be a problem once I start tiling? I've noticed that a 6x6 inch tile is always plush, even in those areas where the 12x12 isn't. Should I switch to 6x6 inch tiles?

Fourthly, in picture #3 below, you can see the corner of the front of the pan. How would you tile around this corner? Should I run a bullnose tile along the outer edge of the pan?

Lastly, what size grout lines should I use for 12x12 inch tiles? For 6x6 inch tiles?

Thanks again all.
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Old 07-16-2013, 06:22 AM   #2
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Bathroom Shower tiling


There's suppose to be a small gap, so no do not cut a new piece, the thin set and tape will take care of that.
Only need about 1/4 gap between the tile and the tub lip that gets filled with silicone caulking.
What's causing the larger tiles to rock, is it the tile not being flat, or is it that the walls that far off?

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Old 07-16-2013, 06:37 AM   #3
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You better figure out what's causing the tiles to rock---get a straight edge--see what is going on---you will end up with a lot of lippage if you don't have a flat wall.

some minor outage can be made up for with more thinset---

At the shower pan, I leave 1/8" gap.

Lay you tiles on the floor,space them the way you like and measure the gap

with 12x12 ceramic, I like 3/16" with marble ,1/16 to 1/8---
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Old 07-16-2013, 10:28 PM   #4
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1/8" joints are fairly common now.

Someone needs to tell you to waterproof that durock.
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Old 07-16-2013, 10:56 PM   #5
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1/8" joints are fairly common now.

Someone needs to tell you to waterproof that durock.
+1. I've used RedGuard and been happy with the results. Looks like a murderous crime scene going up (really, really red-tint to it) but otherwise works great. There are other brands that do more or less the same thing.

Why? Because neither grout nor cement board is actually waterproof.
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Old 07-16-2013, 11:32 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by cleveman View Post
1/8" joints are fairly common now.

Someone needs to tell you to waterproof that durock.
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Originally Posted by wkearney99 View Post
+1. I've used RedGuard and been happy with the results. Looks like a murderous crime scene going up (really, really red-tint to it) but otherwise works great. There are other brands that do more or less the same thing.

Why? Because neither grout nor cement board is actually waterproof.
Cleve, Bill, and the OP....

I'm not saying redguard is not good.... just saying I've been doing showers w/o redguard for 25+ years without a problem.... 6mill poly behind the durock or hardi.

I do use redguard on benches... but the stuff adds a couple hundred $ to a job that is not necessary.

And I just thought of this,.... but why use durock at all if you're going to use redguard??????

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Old 07-16-2013, 11:47 PM   #7
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Cleve, Bill, and the OP....


And I just thought of this,.... but why use durock at all if you're going to use redguard??????

Best

Peter
It's a code thing----few jurisdictions allow gypsum board in a shower---

Schluters Kerdi is approved and warrantied over drywall,but few building departments allow it---
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Old 07-17-2013, 12:06 AM   #8
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Sure, poly behind the cement board helps avoid framing issues. But they you get that wet concrete smell.

As for cost, I don't recall it being hundreds. I think I only needed a gallon for the whole tub & tiled ceiling above it. Certainly more than just some poly, of course, but I figured it was worth it for the benefits. And it's WAY cheaper than foam board and other products.
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Old 07-17-2013, 11:51 AM   #9
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Thanks all. A coat (or two/three) of Redguard will follow after I tape the seams. I couldn't use felt behind the durock because two of the three walls were insualted/exterior walls.

Does anyone recommend the self-adhesive Fiba mesh tape over non-adhesive tape?

Also, when using the self-adhesive tape, do you first fill in the gaps between the cement boards, then apply the tape, then another thin layer of thinset? Is this proceure the same for the seams between cement board and greenboard?

Is there a particular thinset brand that is recommended? I'm not sure if this exists, but is there a thinset that is waterproof? I ask, because if there is, Redguard wouldn't be needed.
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Old 07-17-2013, 12:20 PM   #10
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IMO redguard or hydroban will save your cement board as well as studs as apposed to poly sheet adhered to studs. In any event only one should be used.
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Old 07-17-2013, 01:31 PM   #11
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[QUOTE=JetSwet;1217065]IMO redguard or hydroban will save your cement board as well as studs as apposed to poly sheet adhered to studs. In any event only one should be used.[/QUOTE]


Agree +1^^^^^
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Old 07-17-2013, 01:46 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay2013 View Post
Thanks all. A coat (or two/three) of Redguard will follow after I tape the seams. I couldn't use felt behind the durock because two of the three walls were insualted/exterior walls.

Does anyone recommend the self-adhesive Fiba mesh tape over non-adhesive tape?

Also, when using the self-adhesive tape, do you first fill in the gaps between the cement boards, then apply the tape, then another thin layer of thinset? Is this proceure the same for the seams between cement board and greenboard?

Is there a particular thinset brand that is recommended? I'm not sure if this exists, but is there a thinset that is waterproof? I ask, because if there is, Redguard wouldn't be needed.
Jay... Just as a side note.... I would never recommend felt... it is a vapor retarder..... poly is a vapor barrier.

There is an alkaline mesh tape made especially for moist locations you probably want to use.

I just use my fortified thinset to tape. Yes if there is a big space between rock, I take a swipe and fill it first, then tape. As far as self stick, just a personal preference... I don't really have a preference.... and I can't even remember if the alkaline resistant mesh is self stick or not.

I've never heard of a thinset that is waterproof.... but as I mentioned before in a post, I don't believe redguard/hydoban is required... it certainly is not by code....

I don't think it's bad to use... it is an extra barrier/precaution... but it's an extra cost.... $75/bucket... and dependent on shower size, can easily take 2/3 buckets.... and I've never had a complaint of any wet cement smell/odor from just durock. The odor that is sometimes associated with a shower is when the preslope has not been sloped correctly, and stagnant water pools on the preslope (that's why we slope pre-slopes.)

Best

Peter

Best

Peter
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Old 07-17-2013, 01:58 PM   #13
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JI don't think it's bad to use... it is an extra barrier/precaution... but it's an extra cost.... $75/bucket... and dependent on shower size, can easily take 2/3 buckets....
I did a 60" tub shower recess, including the ceiling, and a fair bit of adjacent wall and floor and I recall it took just over 1 gallon bucket. They're just under $50 around here. When we demo'd the house 5 years later the stuff was still FIRMLY holding everything together and there were NO leaks behind anywhere, even after surviving 4 years of our boy having fun in the tub.

I could understand that an installer might not want to bother as they'd have to charge their labor to apply it. But for a DIY job where it's your own time, it's a product well worth considering.
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Old 07-17-2013, 02:14 PM   #14
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I did a 60" tub shower recess, including the ceiling, and a fair bit of adjacent wall and floor and I recall it took just over 1 gallon bucket. They're just under $50 around here. When we demo'd the house 5 years later the stuff was still FIRMLY holding everything together and there were NO leaks behind anywhere, even after surviving 4 years of our boy having fun in the tub.

I could understand that an installer might not want to bother as they'd have to charge their labor to apply it. But for a DIY job where it's your own time, it's a product well worth considering.
Bill.... I do agree with what you say....

and maybe my estimate is wrong... I just use it basically on benches... and I'm thinking of an expanded two person full shower (no tub or tub recess) application. Maybe it's come down in price (competition with hydroban????)

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Old 07-17-2013, 09:07 PM   #15
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Hydroban is more expensive then redguard. It's to hard to tell which is really is better. They do same thing just different colors.

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