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-   -   Bathroom Floor Slope (http://www.diychatroom.com/f84/bathroom-floor-slope-158820/)

RalphPeters 10-03-2012 10:09 AM

Bathroom Floor Slope
 
The slope of the floor is about 3/4" over 8 feet. The floor is flat just sloped. I want to put tile down over the plywood subfloor and ditra. I put 1/2" A-C exterior plywood over the 5/8" original subfloor. Floor meets the L/360 deflection.

If I used slc it would raise the floor height by 1 inch creating a height difference with the hallway. If I don't level the floor I can imagine water pooling in the low spot when the kids leave the shower curtain open and possibly flowing out the door into the hallway.

Please let me know how you think I should address this.

joecaption 10-03-2012 11:08 AM

Anyone going under the house to see why it's sloped?
May just need to be lifted and reshimed to get the whole thing level again.

RalphPeters 10-03-2012 11:34 AM

I'm not sure why its sloped. Its the upstairs floor that has a support wall underneath. Might have been this way since it was built. I would rather not work from underneath.

Jackofall1 10-03-2012 01:05 PM

Ralph I have a very similar issue in an upstairs bath room, in fact the whole place.

It appears when they built mine, they built the floor deck before the basement was poured (pretty standard) but I believe that they never supported the beam that runs front to back, I also believe that when they poured the basement floor they never leveled the beam out, just clipped the posts onto the beam and poured away.

If I run a string line front to back over the beam the center sags 1-3/4", I am considering jacking the whole place up, very slowly and shimming between the top of the posts and bottom of the beam.

When I pulled the bath tub I found out the reason the shower doors would never seal right to the top of the tub.

The reason I mention this is, you are putting down a floor, have you checked the tub, how level is it. If its sloped the same way as the floor then water is always trying to get out of the tub.

In my case it had been that way a long time before I moved in and the wall and floor had a fair bit of rot.

I did level the floor under the shower, but the rest of the bathroom stayed the way it was.

Mark

RalphPeters 10-03-2012 02:12 PM

Thanks for your responses.

I have put the new tub in place and had to lift on end about 1/2" to have it sit level. The tub has 4 support feet underneath that I had to shim as well.
If I leave the floor as is, I would need a piece of trim along the tub edge and floor since the floor tile will be below the tub at one end. I don't like the idea that any water that gets on the floor will pool in one spot.

Even with the tub sitting level, the distance from tub to ceiling is out as well so it seems that there's more out of level than just the floor.

Jackofall1 10-03-2012 02:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RalphPeters (Post 1022993)
Thanks for your responses.

I have put the new tub in place and had to lift on end about 1/2" to have it sit level. The tub has 4 support feet underneath that I had to shim as well.
If I leave the floor as is, I would need a piece of trim along the tub edge and floor since the floor tile will be below the tub at one end. I don't like the idea that any water that gets on the floor will pool in one spot.

Even with the tub sitting level, the distance from tub to ceiling is out as well so it seems that there's more out of level than just the floor.

Isn't just ashame the way some folks build things, just makes me want to scream when I run into things like this. Well its your call, not sure how water will pool on that floor, unless you are referring to the area directly adjacent the tub.

Mark

notmrjohn 10-03-2012 05:32 PM

Ralph, you may have gone a step to far by putting the plywood down B4 addressing the slope. In fact it might have been best to take up old sub-floor and shim under new 3/4 ply. Aside from time and frustration how hard would it be to start over? You'd avoid that 1" diff at door.

Or maybe not, is the high side too high or the low too low? Raising a low is lots easier than lowering a high. And is the slope along the joists or across?

"I can imagine water pooling in the low spot when the kids leave the shower curtain open and possibly flowing out the door into the hallway." So, i assume the floor slopes toward hall? If not install a floor drain in low spot. Every bathroom needs floor drain, connected to main line way down stream from possible toilet blockage, and you can clean entire bathroom with water hose.:wink:

" it seems that there's more out of level than just the floor." Have you checked your level?:whistling2:

BobsDiy 11-13-2012 03:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RalphPeters
The slope of the floor is about 3/4" over 8 feet. The floor is flat just sloped. I want to put tile down over the plywood subfloor and ditra. I put 1/2" A-C exterior plywood over the 5/8" original subfloor. Floor meets the L/360 deflection.

If I used slc it would raise the floor height by 1 inch creating a height difference with the hallway. If I don't level the floor I can imagine water pooling in the low spot when the kids leave the shower curtain open and possibly flowing out the door into the hallway.

Please let me know how you think I should address this.

I would love to find out how this story is playing out. I have an almost identical situation.

Ralph?

second floor bathroom, 3/4" slope toward door across 6', flat but sloped, same exact floor material selections as OP (ditra, marble).

********
I believe OP's most recent post indicated he has the same dilemma as I am facing now...
*** If tub is simply leveled, there will be a gap between bottom of apron and tile floor ***
********

I do not want to level floor and have a large step from hallway to bathroom. I want to leave the floor unlevel unless there are reasons other than the pursuit of perfection.

Tub options that I can think of with my puny brain - any experience with any of these?

1. Leave tub sloped, requiring lots of wall tile cutting above tub (and never install a door system - thanks for that observation). Any other down sides to a slope of this magnitude in a tub?

2. Level the tub, have gap on bottom between apron and tile (Then what?)

3. Level the tub using mortar bed (removing attached shims under tub basin), cut away apron to match floor slope (kohler archer fiberglass, integrated apron) - is this a very bad idea? What is the best tool to cut this beautiful $700 tub without cracking the apron? (gulp!)

4. Try to return tub for same model without integrated apron, install level, then build tile apron for it.

5. Tear out the entire foundation structure of the home to remedy a 3/4" slope in this bathroom (some responses seem to be approaching this level of effort - seriously people?)

Bob

mnp13 11-13-2012 10:44 AM

If the tub is sloped, when you take a bath won't the load be unevenly distributed? That might not be a big deal, or it could be a huge deal if it makes the tub shift from its place.

Perhaps build a small level platform for the tub? There is no way I'd attempt cutting the tub, you'll likely ruin the finish and possibly ruin the whole thing.

RalphPeters 11-13-2012 11:02 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I'm still working on this so I can't comment on weather my decision to leave the slope in the floor was the right one. The floor is flat so that helped in my decision. The tub will have to be level for proper drainage etc. I had to use a piece of quarter round to cover the gap between the floor and tub. The height distance from the floor to tub apron is not really noticeable unless you're looking for it.

BobsDiy 11-14-2012 01:01 PM

I don't think weight shifting in the tub would be an issue if the tub was secured properly (will make sure of that now that you mention it).
Small platform is not a bad idea - over that short vertical distance on the side of the platform, the slope would probably be visible but whatever.

Floor tile looks good in the pic - nice job.

Well, you've given me two good suggestions so now I will have to dwell. Thanks for the help.


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