Bathroom Floor Has Crown (high Spot) In Center Of Floor, Want To Tile - Tiling, ceramics, marble - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Flooring > Tiling, ceramics, marble

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-02-2011, 11:18 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 50
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Hey guys,

I had some structural issues in a house I bought and the house had to have new joists sistered onto 8 of the exisiting joists along with a beam installed to support it due to what appeared to be water damage. The contractor's said they got the floor the best that they could with the room they had to work with in placing the beam in the basement (basement is finished).

I laid hardibacker down in my bathroom and it became apparent that there was a crown in the center of the floor that ran the whole length of the bathroom. The floor then has a slight slope on each side of the crown (pictures included). I would say from the highest spot, to the lowest spot on the floor there is maybe half and inch of slope (just a guess, used a 4ft level to gauge it).

Is this something I will have enough adjustment with with my thinset when I lay the tile to level it out? Use a 3/8" notched trowel to get more adjustment? I was going to lay 12x12 porcelain tile most likely. Should I scrap that idea and go with something more forgiving like a smaller 6x6"? Is it possible to pour self leveling concrete over the hardibacker?
Attached Thumbnails
Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile-slope.jpg   Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile-pic-0378.jpg   Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile-pic-0377.jpg  

Advertisement

tunabreath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 11:48 AM   #2
A Little Of Everything
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 2,209
Rewards Points: 1,098
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


I don't think self-leveling concrete is the way to go - though I could be mistaken. I've only used it on a concrete floor.

The answer kind of depends on how much of a perfectionist you are. I believe that, with your Thinset, you can build up at least 1/4" in the sides, which leaves you with a slope of about 1/4" over 18". Can you live with that?


On a personal preference note, I think that's a pretty small space to be using 12x12 tiles. Big tiles tend to make a small area look even smaller, especially if they're not laid at a 45 degree angle.

Advertisement

DrHicks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 12:20 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 50
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Quote:
Originally Posted by DrHicks View Post
I don't think self-leveling concrete is the way to go - though I could be mistaken. I've only used it on a concrete floor.

The answer kind of depends on how much of a perfectionist you are. I believe that, with your Thinset, you can build up at least 1/4" in the sides, which leaves you with a slope of about 1/4" over 18". Can you live with that?


On a personal preference note, I think that's a pretty small space to be using 12x12 tiles. Big tiles tend to make a small area look even smaller, especially if they're not laid at a 45 degree angle.
I wasn't sure about the SLC either, thought it was mainly designed for basement floors and concrete slabs.

I thought it worked vise versa...big tiles make an area look bigger? I will probably go with a 6x6 tile then since it will probably be more forgiving with the crown/slope. I figured that with a 3/8" notched trowel it would give me more play while still giving me good adhesion.
tunabreath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 03:52 PM   #4
A Little Of Everything
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 2,209
Rewards Points: 1,098
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Quote:
Originally Posted by tunabreath View Post
I wasn't sure about the SLC either, thought it was mainly designed for basement floors and concrete slabs.

I thought it worked vise versa...big tiles make an area look bigger? I will probably go with a 6x6 tile then since it will probably be more forgiving with the crown/slope. I figured that with a 3/8" notched trowel it would give me more play while still giving me good adhesion.
Hold on just awhile though. There are some professionals here, and I'm sure they'll be along to give you better opinions than just mine.

It also occurs to me... Is your toilet flange set for the increased height of tile?
DrHicks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 03:53 PM   #5
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 10,484
Rewards Points: 2,616
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Quote:
I wasn't sure about the SLC either, thought it was mainly designed for basement floors and concrete slabs.
Not true. SLC's can be used anywhere.

Quote:
I thought it worked vise versa...big tiles make an area look bigger?
According to all of the decorators I do work for they insist larger tiles make a room look larger.

Quote:
I figured that with a 3/8" notched trowel it would give me more play while still giving me good adhesion.
Six inch tile would be happy to follow the slope... but so would twelve inch tiles if you place a grout joint at the crown of the room.

The problem with your theory of using thinset is that thinset is designed to be gauged by the size trowel you use. To attempt to build-up individual tiles in this fashion will only result in a small disaster. Thinset is notorious for shrinking and when it shrinks it will take the tile with it. This will result in some serious lippage where the most thinset-fill is used.

The room isn't that big. SLC would fix the entire problem in short order.

Here's a little more information that should help you. There are two parts to the blog.

http://www.diychatroom.com/blogs/ins...t-one-two-177/
__________________
XXX
Bud Cline is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Bud Cline For This Useful Post:
DrHicks (09-02-2011), epson (09-28-2011), oh'mike (09-02-2011), tunabreath (09-02-2011)
Old 09-02-2011, 05:20 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 50
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
Not true. SLC's can be used anywhere.


According to all of the decorators I do work for they insist larger tiles make a room look larger.



Six inch tile would be happy to follow the slope... but so would twelve inch tiles if you place a grout joint at the crown of the room.

The problem with your theory of using thinset is that thinset is designed to be gauged by the size trowel you use. To attempt to build-up individual tiles in this fashion will only result in a small disaster. Thinset is notorious for shrinking and when it shrinks it will take the tile with it. This will result in some serious lippage where the most thinset-fill is used.

The room isn't that big. SLC would fix the entire problem in short order.

Here's a little more information that should help you. There are two parts to the blog.

http://www.diychatroom.com/blogs/ins...t-one-two-177/
Thanks, Bud. So SLC IS what you recommend for this case? How many sq ft does a bag typically cover? I read your blog, going to read it over a couple more times. Use sill gasket along the whole perimeter of the walls, including the tub I assume?

The toilet flange hasn't been glued into the waste pipe yet. Which brings me to my NEXT question. Flange on top of tile, or flange on top of backer board??
tunabreath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2011, 12:40 PM   #7
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 10,484
Rewards Points: 2,616
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


To plane that floor I would use SLC, yes.
Sill seal is used to create an expansion gap and it is necessary everywhere in my opinion.

The toilet flange can sit atop the tile or atop the tilebacker, doesn't matter.
__________________
XXX
Bud Cline is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2011, 12:44 PM   #8
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 10,484
Rewards Points: 2,616
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Whoops - forgot!

One fifty pound bag of SLC typically covers fifty square feet of floor space 1/8" thick. Didn't I put that in the Blog? I don't remember.
__________________
XXX
Bud Cline is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2011, 01:04 PM   #9
Member
 
m1951mm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 494
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Hey Bud, I am about to do my bathroom floor and the correct height of the flange can be an issue. I have used flange extenders to get the flange to be the same height as the finished tile, is there a better option?? or should I say easier?? It is not that hard to screw in the extender, but what about on a concrete slab??? I know you are the MAN for tile, and that is why I ask.

Speaking of flange extenders, if you add one to the top of the existing should a bead of silicone or (???????????) be added to make sure the new potty does not seep??
__________________
Mickey
Fantasy Walls and Windows

www.picturetrail.com/mickey51
m1951mm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2011, 01:11 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 50
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Ok going to give this a shot Monday or Tuesday. One last question since the blog didn't cover this. Do I only use the SLC to fill in the low spot and let it level itself with the high spot? OR do I need to pour enough SLC to cover the WHOLE floor?
tunabreath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2011, 02:38 PM   #11
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 10,484
Rewards Points: 2,616
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Quote:
Ok going to give this a shot Monday or Tuesday. One last question since the blog didn't cover this. Do I only use the SLC to fill in the low spot and let it level itself with the high spot? OR do I need to pour enough SLC to cover the WHOLE floor?
If the crown is consistent from one end to the other I would plan to pour SLC to first one side of the crown and then the other side of the crown. I would figure enough product to cover the entire room. The problem with this room is the SLC won't feather on its own to blend it to the crown leaving the crown uncovered so to speak. And in addition you have to be able to back your way out of the room as you pour.

Difficult to explain (maybe) without being there.

What are the measurements of the room? It appears the measurement you don't show is just under 96" !!! Is that correct?
__________________
XXX
Bud Cline is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2011, 03:21 PM   #12
Member
 
m1951mm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 494
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Here is a repost hoping that Bud or???? will address the issue of the flange. Kinda important in a bathroom.
__________________
Mickey
Fantasy Walls and Windows

www.picturetrail.com/mickey51
m1951mm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2011, 03:33 PM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 50
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post
If the crown is consistent from one end to the other I would plan to pour SLC to first one side of the crown and then the other side of the crown. I would figure enough product to cover the entire room. The problem with this room is the SLC won't feather on its own to blend it to the crown leaving the crown uncovered so to speak. And in addition you have to be able to back your way out of the room as you pour.

Difficult to explain (maybe) without being there.

What are the measurements of the room? It appears the measurement you don't show is just under 96" !!! Is that correct?
Sorry the measurements I put on that diagram are wrong.

The room is 6ft x 11ft.

That top measurement on the diagram should be 6ft, not 5ft.
tunabreath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2011, 03:50 PM   #14
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 10,484
Rewards Points: 2,616
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Quote:
Sorry the measurements I put on that diagram are wrong.
The room is 6ft x 11ft. That top measurement on the diagram should be 6ft, not 5ft.
Okay somethings still being left out. There must be a closet or blank wall or something on the left as you enter.

Tubs are typically 60", toilet cubby holes are typically 30" to 36". Your information leaves 36" unaccounted for on the left side.

Then on the right side...is there a vanity and is it in place or will it be installed later?

I come up with fifty square feet of floor space if you don't take out for a vanity.
__________________
XXX
Bud Cline is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2011, 04:29 PM   #15
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 50
Rewards Points: 25
Default

Bathroom floor has crown (high spot) in center of floor, want to tile


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bud Cline View Post


Okay somethings still being left out. There must be a closet or blank wall or something on the left as you enter.

Tubs are typically 60", toilet cubby holes are typically 30" to 36". Your information leaves 36" unaccounted for on the left side.

Then on the right side...is there a vanity and is it in place or will it be installed later?

I come up with fifty square feet of floor space if you don't take out for a vanity.
Yes sorry there is a blank wall on the left directly as you enter the room.

The circle in the top left of the diagram is the waste pipe, directly across from it on the other side of the room is where the vanity will be located. 36" vanity, but it will be installed after the floor is laid.

So if I pour the SLC on both sides of the crown, working my way out of the room, and the crown is left exposed, is that OK to tile over? Or are you saying that the SLC will not feather itself enough in the transition to the crown? So just plan on coating the whole floor in SLC, covering the crown?

Bud, thanks so much for answering these questions. No one I know has used this stuff before so it is nice to get some answers. Much appreciated!

Advertisement

tunabreath is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Installing a Toilet on a new tile bathroom floor saltrl Introductions 2 06-21-2011 09:12 PM
Re-tiling a bathtub surround BillyB44 Remodeling 39 01-24-2011 07:10 PM
Bathroom Floor - Tile - floor Height - Flange DoItYourSelfer5 Flooring 2 12-15-2008 07:18 PM
Ceramic tile in bathroom ClnlBrahm Remodeling 11 09-21-2008 10:09 PM
bathroom floor tile job advice needed dbrew Flooring 14 01-23-2007 08:03 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts